Stuck under AT

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by VikingMoto, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. hammerwoman

    hammerwoman Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
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    Just off the Blue Ridge Parkway.
    Having had the freakiest of all freak accidents- after a long, glorious winter day on a perfect track, the short studs on my XR100 ice bike broke traction in a corner, we did a slow, graceful 180, caught traction and did an amazing backflip highside, and I ended up on my back on top of the bike. Unfortunately, I had caught my left foot in the frame, and that foot was under the middle of my back pointed down at the ice, still stuck in the bike- and my leg and knee were broken. If half the local dirt bike club hadn’t seen it happen- and the Merrimack Valley Trail Riders are the best of the best- I’d’ve been there until the ice melted and the bike and I went straight to the bottom. As it was, it took a bunch of folks to lift me off and stand me up. And stand I did. I was fairly certain that the lower leg was injured, and had no intention of unbuckling my boot, but I didn’t really believe about the knee until I saw the x-ray. As it was, I kickstarted the bike, rode it to the edge of the pond, walked to a group of guys at the food tent (it was our annual picnic) and they got my bike and rode it onto the trailer, where I strapped it down and drove first home, then to the Orthopaedic Clinic where I was working at the time. Surgery was a few days later.

    I guess the point of this story is that my initial self-survey told me I was stuck, and likely injured, but I had zero idea how injured. The adrenaline of the whole scene was covering a lot. Happily, this was all close to home and good roads, but it easily might not have been. I’ve done SAR, at night, in shit weather, way off-road, and would definitely prefer that someone, say the OP, who has the choice pull that trigger/push that button ASAP so that we could all get home before dark, and before he was dehydrated, sick, in shock.

    And oh, yes, beer and pizza for the crew, and a bigass cake with a suitably sappy thank-you message on it too. Everybody loves cake.
    #81
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  2. jezza909

    jezza909 Adventurer

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    Guess it depends how you are pinned. I have been stuck in a spot were moving the bike just a few inches up would get my foot free. Sure wished I had a pole and a ratchet strap back then at least give it a try. :lol3:rofl:imaposer
    #82
  3. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
    ...or one of those airbag things?
    #83
  4. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Gold Coast
    I don't think we are saying he should have just stayed stuck and died. Getting help once he realized no one was coming and he wasn't going to get himself out was entirely rational.

    Putting himself in the situation where that was a likely outcome, not so rational.

    Yes a lighter bike might help but it's possible to take lighter bikes into even stupider places :) which pushes the risk back up again. And I dig that it's fun riding those isolated tracks alone. It's also really dangerous and quite possibly obviously dangerous beyond the point where you should assume being rescued from the consequences of your own bad judgment should be free.

    We see this in Australia with people (usually tourists) wandering off into the bush or just driving off down one of the more remote roads. They frequently die as a result, admitted we don't hear about the ones where they never got into trouble but get lost or stuck HERE and your odds of surviving are really poor.
    #84
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  5. jay547

    jay547 Long timer

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    I guess I'm not rational.
    #85
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  6. Lazarus12

    Lazarus12 Adventurer

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    We see this in Australia with people (usually tourists) wandering off into the bush or just driving off down one of the more remote roads. They frequently die as a result, admitted we don't hear about the ones where they never got into trouble but get lost or stuck HERE and your odds of surviving are really poor.


    I thought everything in Australia wanted to kill you anyway. Whether on land or in the water. :brow Never the less, i always admired the tenacity of Australians.
    #86
  7. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Yeah, I'm crazy too, I moved here from New Zealand - which has only one poisonous insect (a not THAT poisonous spider) and no dangerous land animals at all.

    Since then.
    Bitten by snake - check. (Ignored it because it was several hours before I realized I had been bitten)
    Bitten by Redback spider - check. (Left a shirt on the ground and tucked spider into my shorts, noticed I was feeling ill at 3 in the morning and decided - fuck it not dead yet, sleep wins)
    Hit Kangaroos at speed - check. (Multiple times, still alive).
    Waved some serious bikies down. - check. Road hazard ahead, they were surprised, survived that as well despite pointing out that they probably could get by but the chrome would get scratched. Just an FYI 1%'rs do have a sense of humor - provided you don't owe them money.
    #87
  8. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP . Supporter

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    That's a bingo. 2-way SENDs have fundamentally changed how rescuers interact with those in need. If you read many accounts, they often mention someone using their SEND to coordinate with rescuers, receive treatment guidance, provide updates, etc. The SAR resources that responded to the OP were able to make whatever whatever arrangements they deemed necessary.

    See above, and lighten up. OP acted wisely once pinned, and I'll extend that to the rescuers, as well. People have gone hypothermic when in direct contact with the ground over several hours, let alone pinned in place so that their movement is restricted. It doesn't have to be winter or on the summit of a 14er for that to happen.

    Exactamundo.

    Yep.
    #88
  9. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    Agree totally! I don't ride any off road and very little back road without another rider. Freak accidents, no matter how rare, still happen and they happen to both careful and careless people. One friend slid out and high sided, breaking his collar bone due to the pea gravel crap from patching in a blind corner. Those with him took care of him and actually he rode back double with my brother, then to the hospital.

    Do you give skiers hell because they didn't carry a shovel to dig themselves out of avalanches?
    #89
  10. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Skiers certainly do get hell if they get into trouble skiing off the marked trails. Apart from anything else it puts everyone else's life in danger. So I guess that's a yes.
    #90