Stupid trials question thread...

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Garthe, Nov 2, 2014.

  1. Hoss Cartright

    Hoss Cartright 219.474.6657

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    Last September I was "balked" for the first time since the 1970s. There was a big rock outcropping and there were a bunch of people in the section. They were so numerous, they had no place to go as I approached them. I called-out "BALK" and everyone knew it was legit. Got the re-ride, got the clean and moved on..
  2. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    I replaced one on my beta, the grooves worn in it were at an angle, so it held the chain briefly and released with a snap, which made a slap noise when the chain hit the swing arm guard. It is not reversible . I probably could use a new tensioner guide arm.
  3. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    How important to a recreational rider is the state of the carcass of the front tire? From the date code, the front tire of my GG is from the fall of 2007 (and likely OEM). The sidewalls are somewhat cracked yet the knobs are reasonable. Would there be a noticeable change in the ride if I were to replace the tire with a new one? The current tire is a Michelin.
  4. Feel the knobs. If they're pliable and soft, it's fine. If they're really hard, it's garbage and I'd change it.
  5. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    For a recreational rider you would feel no difference. At the 2016 Colorado National I rode a 1976 Cota 348 with 20 year old tires. Traction was never an issue. Of course from a competitive view, replace them. I just rode the Donner National and I was going to install a new Michelin. Fortunately I ran out of time to change it, my worn out Dunlap did just fine. Being a Gasser I would spend the money on clutch plates or a shift shaft.
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  6. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Something similar happened to me a couple of years ago. I had no idea about the Balk Rule but there were a few folks in the section while I was approaching my first obstacle. A friend, not in my class, step into the line and I dabbed. He apologized immediately and the scorer awarded me a re-ride. I would hope that this is something that's just common sense but, at the same time, you should be OK with others in the section, as long as they're not impeding you.
  7. Ditch

    Ditch Long timer

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    One of our trials clerks was in a section I was riding earlier this year and while attempting to clear out kept running in the direction of my line. I was laughing so hard I almost fell over, but cleaned the section regardless (one of very few). He was really sorry.
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  8. Buschog

    Buschog Long timer

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    Do you have any drills for me to get my weight off my hands and onto my feet.
    I know it seems stoopid, but I cannot seem to shift my weight back off from my hands. At least not for more than a few seconds or minutes.
    So, I obviously need to put some more dedicated effort into it.
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  9. Gordy

    Gordy SUPPORTER

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    One of Ray Peter's (look it up) main coaching tips it to ride one handed. Simply take your clutch hand off, hover it if needed, and ride. Try circles and figure eights. You will soon feel how the pegs control the bike. I've seen him ride some of our intermediate lines with one hand. :bow
    This reminds me.....I need to work on that drill some more.
  10. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    I think that is why I liked the curve foot pegs. It forces your weight back, but the first ride or two are hard on the ankles.
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  11. Gordy

    Gordy SUPPORTER

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    Agreed. They seem to help keep your weight back (where it belongs) but do put some pressure where you are not used to it. My new TRS doesn't have them but it feels to me that the new pegs act similarly as the old curve. :dunno
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  12. riabma77

    riabma77 Been here awhile

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    I have the bad habit to put too much pressure in the handlebars. What it seems to help (for me) is riding tight corners over steep terrain. It forces me to move my weight back, and learn to turn using the pegs. I guess it works because I don't dab so much, and my arms / shoulders aren't so tired after 2 hours.

    Interesting the technique to ride one handed. Maybe one day I will try it.
  13. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    A question/comment from a novice/recreational rider >>> who does not want to start a flame-war <<<, might higher bars and/or bar-risers promote a more upright riding position, and hence have less weight on your hands?
  14. sceep

    sceep Long timer

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    Now you've gone and done it...

    Might bending your knees thus lowering your shoulders/arms achieve the same goal?
  15. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    :hair





    Nothing wrong with a taller bar, :baldy except you loose leverage. A taller rider might get by, but risers belong on CHOPPERS.:doh
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  16. Dorian

    Dorian huge carbon footprint

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    I think like sceep suggests, alter your riding position. I attended a riding school with James Lampkin a few years ago. The subject of bar risers came up in conversation. James said if you're somewhat proportionate bar risers are not needed (tall riders have proportionate leg/arm lengths for example). I fit in that tall category at 6'3" and with the proper stance, remembering to bend my knees, I see his point.
  17. Buschog

    Buschog Long timer

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    PERFECT!!! That is exactly what I was looking for. Know what I'm doing after work as a part of my warm up now. I'll have to remember that for 15 minutes or so of warm up for every ride.

    Seriously, thank you. I thought I was truly asking a stupid question.
  18. Buschog

    Buschog Long timer

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    I thought Curves tilted forward... so more flat footed when in a wheelie (vertical) position. Wouldn't that make it more difficult get my weight back, when in a normal riding position?
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  19. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    You would think that, but I think the angle puts the weight on the back edge of the peg. Which makes the front end feel easier to come up. That is why it is uncomfortable the first ride.
  20. riabma77

    riabma77 Been here awhile

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    Interesting review from Pat Smage:

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