Stupid trials question thread...

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Garthe, Nov 2, 2014.

  1. ADW

    ADW 'tard bike restos

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    Rochester MI
    Hi guys (and gals)! I'm setting up a small practice area (22x35) in my suburban back yard, and am wondering how to properly secure obstacles. For example, I have a 3' long 6x6. How would you typically secure that to the ground? Rebar? Stakes? Something else? I also have a pedestal from a concrete birdbath that I want to lay on it's side. How would I best secure that? half a dozen pieces of rebar around the perimeter driven straight in around the edges? Maybe a inverted U shape with about a foot of rebar comprising the U "legs" that gets driven into the ground? Etc.

    I've tried hammering in wooden stakes around a lot of these pieces, but they break quickly. The 6x6 is currently surrounded by about 8 heavy duty plastic landscape stakes/tent stake thingies, but I can feel it roll when I go over it, so that's not enough. I also intend to get a large log, maybe 5' long and 18" diameter or so to practice "too tall for the skidplate to get over" log crossings. How can I hook that to the ground successfully?

    Basically I'm just looking for someone who's done a lot of anchoring of obstacles for their best practices to do that. I don't want to do any somewhat "irreversible" stuff like concreting them into the ground or something as I will want to move things around over time. Thanks!
    #61
  2. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,076
    Location:
    nm
    The 6x6 I would just add a 2x4 at each end. The log I would bury at each end. Stakes and such should be avoided. I do use rebar to attach railroad ties , but never leave anything out that you could fall on.
    #62
  3. ADW

    ADW 'tard bike restos

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    Rochester MI
    Good idea on the 6x6! Thanks. How about the birdbath pedestal, any clever ideas on that?
    #63
  4. Gordy

    Gordy SUPPORTER

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Oddometer:
    32,697
    Location:
    NM
    Just lay it down an learn to bunny hop? :dunno

    No joking, you need to learn to ride "soft" and get over things without always banging into them.
    #64
  5. ADW

    ADW 'tard bike restos

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    Rochester MI
    Understood, but it's going to be a while before I learn that...I'm gonna end up banging into them some as I try to achieve "soft" contact. Or are you saying that I should just accept that and keep practicing until I don't bang into them? Seems like I'm going to be stopping and getting off the bike to put them back in position quite a lot.
    #65
  6. Gordy

    Gordy SUPPORTER

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2001
    Oddometer:
    32,697
    Location:
    NM
    Do both if you can. I have a 18" PVC pipe that would roll all over the place and I never did anchor it down but worked on getting over it without rolling it (too much).

    I'm not real sure what you are doing to bang a 4X4 post that is laying down but I guess that is something that needs to be learned as well. :dunno

    There is a bunch of this junk in the backyard trials thread, you might get some ideas in there.
    #66
  7. ADW

    ADW 'tard bike restos

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    Rochester MI
    Yes, I've been reading the backyard trials thread, that's what inspired me to try to build something in my back yard. Didn't really see too much specifically about anchoring (other than burying stuff in, which I don't want to do unless absolutely necessary as I don't want to completely commit this hunk of yard to the trials practice area forever).

    Regarding the 4x4 (actually it's a 6x6), we all gotta start somewhere! Thanks for the info.
    #67
  8. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,322
    Location:
    Baking in AZ
    I was anchoring telephone poles with rebar. Got the big cheap long Harbor Freight auger bits and poked holes through the poles and hammered rebar through. It was 3 "logs" stacked like a pyramid and tapered to all 3 flat.

    Stayed together for years. Came apart fairly easy when the landscape project started.
    #68
  9. slicktop

    slicktop Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,096
    Location:
    Slicktop Mtn. Ar.
    That's how I'd anchor in the yard. I'd countersink the rod a bit. When you want to remove the rods just grab em with a pipe wrench and turn and lift.
    #69
  10. DerViking

    DerViking Shred

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,047
    Location:
    Black Bill Park
    I generally agree with letting things move around, it is good practice.

    Speaking from painful personal experience, make sure you don't have any utilities buried right below your obstacle. It's easier than you would guess to drive rebar through a gas or water line, and a power line could be a bummer.
    #70
  11. thetable

    thetable Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,542
    Location:
    Western Loudoun Co, VA
    My stupid question: should the carb vents have hoses attached, or should they just be open? Bought a used Sherco 2.9 in need of attention on several accounts, no hoses coming off the carb, but I feel like there should be.
    #71
  12. slicktop

    slicktop Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,096
    Location:
    Slicktop Mtn. Ar.
    My take is any place a hose can be installed, do it. Just note what goes up and what goes down.
    #72
  13. ADW

    ADW 'tard bike restos

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    Rochester MI
    Be aware that you don't want the carb bowl vent to be below a water line if longer water crossings are the norm for your trials events. A bowl vent submerged for a long time can cause the engine to quit because it's not a vent anymore (!), being "plugged" by the water it's under.
    #73
  14. Vincentg

    Vincentg Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2014
    Oddometer:
    18
    With the tubeless rear, is a sealant used like on mountain bikes?
    #74
  15. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,322
    Location:
    Baking in AZ
    No. Although I am sure some people still do.

    The old Fantic just had a rubber rim strip. No idea how it worked, but it did.
    The new Sherco has turnbuckle style spokes so no holes into the rim.
    #75
  16. DerViking

    DerViking Shred

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,047
    Location:
    Black Bill Park
    I dump some stans no tube in when I mount up a new tire. I have had a lot of slow leaks, and the sealant seems to work pretty well. I don't find it necessary to refresh except at tire change.
    #76
  17. Sting32

    Sting32 Trials Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,046
    Location:
    Minneapolis, Ks
    Early "no tube" rims were mostly tube type looking rims, that had a much deeper valley where the spoke nipples are. with a 3/8 inch or thincker rubber 'band" that covered the spoke nipples and holes. carefull cleaning usually made the rubber seal just fine. after corrosion happens, a thin dab of silcone on each side of the valley where the rubber seals the rim (I keep silicone off the spoke nipples) makes it air tight again.

    Or, just use a tube, they weigh just a pound or so, until you are hopping rear wheel all day long, you probably wont notice the weight difference at all.
    #77
  18. grizCP

    grizCP RMTA

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    761
    Location:
    Chipita Park, CO
    So, I broke my throttle cable this past weekend. Super stoked that my local parts store had one in stock. Brought it home, installed... there is a crap-mile of free-play.

    Am I missing something? Is there any way to adjust tension in the cable? (I'm guessing about 1/4-turn of the throttle of free play.) As I kept messing with it, I took the cover off the throttle body a few times and sure enough cracked it.... GRRRR.

    Total noob. ^%&^#!
    #78
  19. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,076
    Location:
    nm
    Wrong cable. Who did you buy it from? The throttle cover is very cheap.
    #79
  20. grizCP

    grizCP RMTA

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    761
    Location:
    Chipita Park, CO
    Apex in the Springs. Part number was attached to the cable on handwritten tag - sure seemed to be close to the old one, but it was broken, so hard to tell. For a minute I thought the throttle tube was broken or something. When I released the throttle tube and the slide falls, the cable gives enough slack that a few times it popped out of the channel around that little pulley wheel in the throttle housing.
    #80