Summer 2020 on a Honda CB 450

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Joris van O, Apr 17, 2021.

  1. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Some of you might know that I had to cut short my previous trip though South America when Covid hit. Back in March 2020 I abandoned my old but trusty little Honda Two Fifty at the Chilean Customs and flew back to the Netherlands. Thankfully my parents let me move in with them temporary. After almost a year away, I was left a drained bankaccount and with lots of time on my hands. So after being home for a few days I did the sensible thing and bought another bike!

    Not just any bike, this must have been one of the cheapest ones online. A 88' Honda CB450N, running but barely ridable. It cost me a whopping €225, or about 250 dollar. Most of the time these kind of bikes are bought up and parted out. But that wasn't my plan, I wanted to give it another chance and get it back on the road.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I knew it ran, but it only started with the aid of a batterybooster. So once it was in the shed the first thing was to charge the battery, see if it still lives. Then it was time to assess the bike, see what needs fixing and order some parts. The oil was black, so new oil and filters were a given. As were new fork seals.. the little band-aid around the fork gave that one away. The rev counter cable was little more that a stump, so that needed replacing too.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Upon removing the seat, the rear mudguard seemed a bit crusty. Digging through the scrap metal bin I soon found some bits to piece it bag together. Not my finest welding, but hey, that's where the grinder is for.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This 450 has an oilcooler from factory. But the factory mounting bracket was gone and it was only held in place by tie-wraps (tieraps, tywraps, tyraps?). So out came the welder again to weld a bit of metal onto the frame.
    [​IMG]

    The indicators were missing, so I put some cheap indicators on to make it road legal, those will be changed later. The headlight surround was cracked and held together with duct tape, so that was replaced with one laying around. Plus the lightswitches weren't working so they got fixed too.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Still hadn't ridden it at that point, but that would change soon. The mailman dropped off the parts I ordered. The battery was dead so that needed replacing as well. With the battery, oil and filter changed I could finally take it out for a spin!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Well.. Made it about 100 meters down the street before the 30+ year old oilcooler lines blew causing a small environmental disaster. I thought about getting new expensive hoses made, or making them myself using fittings and such.. but then went for the cheap option of high pressure rubber hose and a clamp.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Tore out the forks to replace the seals, and clean up the brakes as they weren't working that great either. And spend a few hours removing the rusted rounded off bleedvalves, managed to get them out without snapping for once.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    So it finally ran without losing it's oils. But when warming up the low oilpressure warning light came on. Ah.. great, now what? I found it hard to believe it had low oil pressure since it blew the lines but needed a way to measure it. Since I didn't have the right tools I cobbled something together out of a T-piece, a bit of hose, a tire valve and a pump. A few tries showed it had plenty of pressure, and you should've seen the mess it made when one of the hoses slipped of the T-piece. The only culprit left was the oil pressure sensor, which is of course burried behind the clutch cover. It took me a while to find the issue, and I guess that is why this bike was decommisioned as well.. the oil pressure sensor worked alright when cold, but when heated up it started giving false readings. Giving the exact same symptoms of a failing oil system. The fix was a new sensor (€4).
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We were getting there now, it ran great but it was a bit too loud. Both exhausts dampers and centre collectorbox weren't far off from a swiss cheese, causing a sporty but mostly just very annoying noise. Like anything else on this bike the exhaust studs were rusted stuck and three of the four snapped off and required drilling and tapping. The downpipes were still good so I got a set of used dampers and welded those on. Covering the weld with the heatshield. The massive and heavy collector went in the bin and was replaced with an H-pipe made up of various bits..
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I had replaced the rev counter cable, but the clock made whining noises while running. After some investigating it seemed the inner cable was a bit to long, a bit of filing did the trick.
    [​IMG]

    Only a new clutch left to install (and numerous other small things) and the little bugger was done.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    It ran reliable so I took it out on the dutch TET (trans euro trail) for a day. Turned ou it was in dire need of a new chain and sprockets. For the new set I shelled out more than half then what I paid for the bike :D
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    It wasn't a grand adventure but it still felt great to be out on a bike, following a line on the gps along the few sandy tracks that you can still find in the East. Back in the shed I made something to put on the wall, to remind me of the days with Little red. But with the 450 fixed it was time for another trip!
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21,781
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Count me in. :clap
    #2
    Joris van O likes this.
  3. MrBob

    MrBob On a whim Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    24,621
    Location:
    Wisconsin?
    No matter what, you got to say you know the bike well.
    #3
    Joris van O likes this.
  4. ilten

    ilten Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    18
    I was looking forward to this report :clap.
    #4
    Joris van O likes this.
  5. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Summer 2020 it seemed like Covid was fast disappearing, and a few countries were opening up again. By then I was looking for a job, and a place to live.. but I still had plenty of time to go somewhere. Nordkapp has been on my mind for a while now, but Norway kept it's borders shut so that wasn't happening. So to scratch the itch I decided to head to Germany for a couple of days before I had to be back for a job application. I didn't take many photos as this was just a short trip, but have a few so I'll share those. I went online to find some gpx files for routes through southern Germany, and used those to come up with some sort of direction. But really, most of the time I went by feel. If the road looks squirrelly on the map, and the terrain looks uneven it's probably good. After a day meandering through the German countryside I pitched my tent in the little town of Wolf on the Moselle. Oh how I had missed this!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    In the morning I left the quiet campsite and followed the backroads south to Baden-Baden. There the 'B500' or the Schwartzwaldhochstrasse begins. This road, the Black Forest High Road, is a beautiful stretch of tarmac over several hilltops around 1000m high. After a while I got of this main route and headed for Freiburg im Breisgau. A friend that I had met in Canada a year before had invited me to come over so we could go for a hike together. After another wonderful day of riding I arrived in the evening just in time for dinner!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The next day, together with some friends we took a bus to a small town near Freiburg, named Sankt Peter. The walk back from this little town was a gentle 20km through the hills and forest. Once back in Freiburg we finished the day with a tasy cold one in one of the beergartens overlooking the city. Gotta love the Germans for their beer culture!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After hanging out in Freiburg for two nights it was time to move on. I wanted to try a bit of sector 13 from the French TET. It's the part that runs north from the border with Switserland. I knew I wouldn't be able to do the whole part, and wasn't planning on either. The tires were almost bald and this bike has a very low and exposed oilpan so isn't that suited to be bashed around offroad. Still had a good bit of fun on some forest tracks, and gravel roads through the fields. The annoying thing with the TET is that it's all just short sections, a few hundred meters here, a few hundred there. So you have to be very vigilant on the GPS to not miss a turn.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Riding the TET took a long time for very little progress kilometer-wise. At the end of the day I did maybe 200km, but they were fun so all was well :) Picked a municipal campsite in the town of Fresse-sur-Moselle. Those municipal campsites are always pretty cheap!
    [​IMG]

    This campsite was very close to the Vosges area, and those are (atleast for motorcyclists) famous for the Route des Cretes. A bit like a French version of the Schwarzwaldhochstrasse from a few days before, this route also runs along some famous high peaks in the Vosges, like the Hohneck and the Grand Ballon. After leaving the campsite I only stopped to enjoy some lunch on the Hohneck and barely took any pictures, the riding was too good! :D
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Leaving the Vosges area the landscape flattens quite a bit, only those rolling hills with yellow grass left for the rest of the day. Again following backroads I made my way up north to near the border with Luxembourg, where I spend the night on another municipal campsite next to a lake.
    [​IMG]

    After a week it was time to head home again.. I needed to prepare for those job interviews. Dipping into Luxembourg, which always offers brilliant riding, past the Beaufort castle ruins and then into Belgium. Crossing into the Netherlands the riding immediately gets boring so I jumped on the highway and was home within two hours. That was a great week of riding, sightseeing and most of all the crappy old Honda didn't let me down once.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #5
  6. Cal

    Cal Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,387
    Location:
    Calgary
    Joris
    The memory you made on the wall, was it brought home with you or just the stickers?
    #6
    Joris van O likes this.
  7. MotoRojo

    MotoRojo Still in the asylum

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    113
    Location:
    Beautiful British Columbia
    Awesome restoration work and thanks for doing a ride report!

    The motorcycle virus is truly in your blood, Joris
    #7
    Joris van O likes this.
  8. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,629
    Location:
    GTA, ON, CDA
    Great stuff!
    I bet you're liking that extra 200cc's.
    73,000 kms? Lots of life left in that girl, enjoy, we are...
    #8
    Joris van O likes this.
  9. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,604
    Joris , you are a genuine mechanic and make do artist . And a photographer too.
    You provided some novel input for me on the possible cause of a whining speedo cable , too long inner drive cable ! “
    In your photo of the test device for the engine oil pressure is that what it looks like to me, connected in to the pressure gauge of a small 12 V tire pump ? How does that work ? Are you pumping in air which then builds back pressure on the air pump gauge ? What reading would be a target for it being good?
    And don’t be so harsh on scenery in Nederland being supposedly “ boring “ - it’s just overly familiar to you . You blasted right past the “ Dutch Alps” that were off to your right in Limburg. How I would have loved to be doing those roads again these last two years.
    “ Exotic” scenery is in the mind of the viewer .
    #9
    LaurensT, Steril and Joris van O like this.
  10. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I took them from the bike and brought those pieces home with me Cal! They almost got me for overweight luggage on the plane back, but still worth it.

    Thanks! Ha, yes I'm afraid so.. Many more ideas for places to ride to, but now it's time (and Covid) that's getting in the way. Though I have noticed that I want to combine riding with hiking more and more, so there is a shift of focus. Planning to do a multi-day hike at some point in the future, preferably take the bike somewhere and then start walking.

    Thanks Den! It was definitely a bit quicker than the 250, but still not world-shockingly fast haha. Funny you mention the kilometers.. It ran great, but it had a faint noise coming from the bottom-end. Apparently these cb400/450's engines have car-like crankshaft and rod bearings and are more susceptible to wear (but probably just worn out :D).

    Thanks Sjoerd! Make-do artist or cheapskate, it's a thin line :D

    It is indeed a 12v tire pump, a very well lubricated one now. I didn't have the right tool to measure the oil pressure, only a couple of airpressure gauges, so had to resort to those. The oil line to cooler was T-ed into the 12v tire pump to show the pressure. It was around 5/6 bar (80 psi) on idle (cold) and went up to 8 bar (120 psi) with some revs. I tried a few gauges and they all were around that number so figured it worked well enough. I don't know the factory specs, but an old Volvo I once had required the oil pressure to be around 4/5 bar. :D

    And you're right about the Netherlands! It is a great area. But if you're just coming back from a week riding in Germany, France or Luxembourg, it's just a bit less interesting. Plus there is quite a bit of traffic, cyclists and such, to share the roads with.
    #10
    GISdood, ilten, Mcahron and 3 others like this.
  11. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    About a month later, I had managed to land a job and find a place to live, great! But by that time it was the height of summer and I still had a few weeks until my first day in the office. So what to do then? Get on you bike and ride of course! I had pinpointed some places in France I wanted to see, mostly in the Auvergne region and the south of France. So with a general direction I set off (around noon, because I was lazy). Again, I wasn't planning on doing any sort of write-up on this trip, so I've only got a handfull of crappy phone photos. So some days may seem a bit short :D

    Because I left late I did the first few hours on the highway, just to get to unfamiliar grounds quickly. Past Charleroi in Belgium I got off the main road and followed the more sedate small town roads across the border and into France. I'd never been to Charleville-Mezieres so that was a good place to stop for the night. It turned out to be a great little city, like there are many of in France. A beautiful main square, and small artisanal shops in the adjacent streets and alleyways.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I wanted to avoid the eastern route that I've taken many times to get to the south of France, so from Charleville I headed straight through the middle to the Morvan. This area between Sedan and Verdun saw many heavy battles in the First World War. And riding through it I'd spotted small monuments and graveyards along the road, but this one monument really stood out. Monument de la Ferme de Navarin, or Navarin Ossuary monument was build to honor the fallen of the armies in de Champagne region. The remains of 10.000 unnamed soldiers are housed in the crypt. "The monument has the shape of a pyramid on which there is a sculpture representing three soldiers in an attack position (right to left):
    - Quentin Roosevelt, flying officer, son of former American President.
    - The general Gouraud at the head of the IVth army
    - The sculptor's brother who died at the Moulin of Laffaux
    Inside, there is a chapel which walls are covered with plates placed by the families in memory of the dead soldiers." https://www.uswarmemorials.org/html/monument_details.php?SiteID=147&MemID=228
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Skipping past the cities of Chalons-en-Champagne and Troyes, just keep heading south along these great little roads. I think these photos were near Tonnerre.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Lac des Settons is one of the bigger lakes in the Morvan region, i'd looked online and there were some campsites along the lake. With the temperatures pretty high, it would be nice to cool off and have a bit of a swim after a long day of riding. Turns out everyone from miles around had that same idea and had flocked to the lake. It took a couple of tries to find a place to camp as many campsites had a sign in front saying 'Complet', Full. Of course the moment I had set up my tent, got changed into my swimwear and went for a swim, a massive thunderstorm rolled in. It only lasted a short while fortunately and soon the sun was out again. Dinner time!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    From next days ride to the town of Chambon-sur-Lac in the Auvergne I didn't take any pictures, guess it was a good day then :D I do remember I had to take out my rain gear for the first time on the trip as another short but quite powerfull storm rolled past. There were a lot of branches on the road after. A larger one was right around a corner and was bound to give someone a bad day, so together with another motorist we dragged that one to the side. Chambon-sur-Lac was quite busy, and here too I had to try a few times to find a campsite. The french aren't known to go abroad during the holidays much and with Covid limiting the options even more, they probably all stayed within the country. I snatched this one last pitch at Camping lac Chambon Les Bombes, which wasn't actually available. But since the owner of the caravan was away the nice lady let me set up camp there for two days.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The Auvergne region in south-central France is known for its many extinct (or dormant?) volcanos. Around 80 of them in total. Most of them form a line known as the Chaine des Puys. with the Puy de Sancy being the highest. 'Puy', derived from the Latin 'Podium', is a locally used term indicating a volcanic or isolated hill. I took a day 'off' to go and see some of these Puys, starting with the Puy de Dôme. One of the youngest volcanos in the region, being only 11.000 years old. Getting there I took the Col de Guery, and stopped at the Roches Tuilière et Sanadoire viewpoint for a look at one of the many volcano remnants that day.
    [​IMG]

    Coming down from the Col I continued on to the Puy de Dôme, parked the bike at the base and started the walk up. For the less active among us there is a train going up as well, but I wanted to go for a nice walk so went up one side and down the other circling the volcano. Borrowed this pic from Google, as it's hard to photograph a volcano.
    [​IMG]

    Once at the top you can easily see the row of Puys, the volcanic hills. The volcano is one of the highlights in the area so it didn't come as a surprise that there were many people up there.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I followed a path down the other side and circled around, through those nice meadows and forested areas lower down. It was still early in the day when I arrived back at the bike, and I figured that there was just enough time to ride to and walk up another hill. Had to double back on myself a bit to get to Puy de Sancy near Le Mont-Dore, taking the Col de la Croix-Morand for a second time that day. But with roads this good, who cares about riding them twice.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Puy de Sancy is the highest mountain in the Massif Central, at just under 1900 meters. It's definately not the same as those volcanos in Mexico or Bolivia, those are in a league of their own. But nonetheless it's a great climb to the top. Instead of going the longer and more gently way, which looked really boring as it was a skislope, I decided to follow a little track straight up the hill.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The whole day the weather played nice, but at the top I could see some rain in the distance. Time to head down, and since there was cable car why not use it to speed things up a bit.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Again, borrowed this one from the internet.. I was hoping for a nice sunset like this at the top of Puy de Sancy but alas, Google will have to do :D
    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. Cal

    Cal Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,387
    Location:
    Calgary
    Camping in France is so great! Restaurants on site for beer and burgers! Actually camping any where in Europe is so different than NA very civilized! Thanks for the report
    #12
    Steril and Joris van O like this.
  13. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Being this far south already, it would be a shame to not ride a bit further and chill on a beach on the mediterranean sea for a day. There were some cool things along the way worth stopping at, so with a general destination I set off under clouded skies. I'd lined up some 'Cols' (mountainpasses) on maps.me to keep me entertained for the first few hours.. They weren't the real deal like the ones you get in the Alps, but still.. It's a nice way to travel through the Auvergne. From Col de la Volpiliere it was onwards to Col de la Pierre Plantee, Col de la Vazeze, Col de Fortunier and Col de Montirargues.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Not done with mountain passes yet, followed the D680 up the Col d'Eylac. Which will take you to the Puy Mary, another extinct volcano (1,783 meter or 5,850 feet).
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    From there it was downhill, passing the city of Aurillac and then east to the Aubrac region. This is another volcanic area, but this one is more like a high plateau. For lunch I stopped at the Barrage de Sarrans near Brommat, enjoying some fresh croissants from that morning :) On Google it is shown as the Parc naturel regional de l'Aubrac, quite a mouthful, but I have to say those narrow winding roads on that plateau were just great! On of the town names I remember riding through was Saint-Urzice, from there I continued to Chanac, where I found a campsite to spend the night. Not many pictures of this day, so I have to piece together my route from memory mostly.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    France has a lot of gorges, the most famous ones are Gorges d'Ardeche (with it's Pont d' Arc)and Gorges du Verdon. Another great one is Gorges du Tarn, which is near Chanac conveniently. First stop was at Point Sublime, with such a name it must be good. Like always, crappy phone pictures don't do it justice, the view was really good.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Via the D46 and a set of switchbacks on the D995 I descended down into the canyon.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    A long time ago, I think when I was 10 years old, my parents took me and my brothers canoeing on the Tarn river while on holiday. I still remember that we went under this bridge in La Malene. And a few years ago, riding my Honda C50, I stopped to have lunch here. So I got some croissants from the bakery nearby and did it again.
    [​IMG]

    Google pic from Chateau de Castelbouc, I went over a narrow bridge across the river but didn't go inside the castle.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Riding through the Parc national des Cevennes in August, the temps were high. So when I came across this river I just had to stop and cool off. It's north of the small town of Anduze. I ended the day on a expensive campsite on the La Sorgue river.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Reason for camping there was the source of the La Sorgue river. According to wikipedia the spring in Fontaine-de-Vaucluse is fifth biggest spring in the world. That's worth checking out. the source of the river is located in a narrow but high gorge. It takes rainwater years and years to trickle through the porous limestone, then it surfaces here in a cave.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The water is cristal clear and very cold. The town of Fontaine-de-Vaucluse is small and on a summers day filled with people but the river itself is beautiful!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    On route to Rustrel I accidentally passed the stunning town of Gordes. Never heard of it before, but it was great to walk around for an hour or so. Did some people-watching while devouring a baguette with some slices of cheese.
    [​IMG]

    Near Rustrel is another great sight. French Colorado, or in French Le Colorado Provencal. Due to erosion (and quarries) the iron rich clay and sand is exposed, making for a desertlike area in an otherwise green landscape.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    In a previous post, the one about the short trip to Germany, I took the Route des Crêtes through the Vosges region. But there are actually two Route des Crêtes in France. The second one runs from Cassis to La Ciotat, along the mediterranean Sea. And like many roads in the south of France, this one is a good one too. I got there late afternoon and although there were still some cars on the road, I could still enjoy the corners. But for the best view you have to get off the bike at one of the many viewpoints.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    No Covid rules in La Ciotat it seemed. I had promised myself a day on the beach, so that is what I did.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #13
  14. Joris van O

    Joris van O Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    390
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Couldn't agree more Cal! A lot of campsites have their own restaurant or bar, or are in a town where there are plenty. So unless you are wildcamping up in the mountains somewhere you don't really have to plan or worry about dinner. We don't have those vast expanses without any form of civilization here, not in France at least.
    #14
    Steril likes this.
  15. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,629
    Location:
    GTA, ON, CDA
    Beautiful area and ride to the Med!
    How much is an "expensive" campsite?
    Bike is looking good, running good?
    Sadly I've only been to some cities in Europe and Russia many moons ago on a month long school trip, my favourite was Amsterdam!
    #15
    Joris van O likes this.
  16. Cal

    Cal Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,387
    Location:
    Calgary
    And Den just so you know in Amsterdam there is a huge campsite right in the middle of the city, you can walk to a ferry over to the main downtown.
    #16
    Joris van O and roadcapDen like this.
  17. Franque

    Franque Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Oddometer:
    721
    Location:
    Dallas, Tx -> Aubagne, France
    Man, I wish I had known you went down to La Ciotat, I'm like 15km away, we could have gotten a beer, and I could have shown you La Sainte Baume (a regional park too), a road I like even better than la route des crêtes. When you mentioned the first one, I was really confused, knowing the one more local to me. Another time!
    #17
    Joris van O likes this.
  18. Johnnydarock

    Johnnydarock Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    Redondo Beach CA
    Good stuff. Thanks for posting.
    #18
    Joris van O likes this.
  19. Firenailer

    Firenailer Still Ridin'

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Oddometer:
    517
    Location:
    Connecticut
    This is SO great! Ah, to be young again! Buy a clapped out 30+ year old bike, fix it up good enough in the garage and head out Touring! God I love it! I’m enjoying your RR more than I can say lol!
    #19
    Joris van O, Steril and steved57 like this.
  20. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    343
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Sheesh, even at home he's a tourist.
    #20
    Joris van O likes this.