Super Sherpa thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by AZstrommer, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. Wadmalaw-Rider

    Wadmalaw-Rider Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2018
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Wadmalaw Island, SC
    I'd be interested in seeing folks' Super Sherpa tool kits for long distance travel.. anything specific to our bikes that you like?
    OU812 likes this.
  2. Singlespeed92

    Singlespeed92 Full time rider

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    256
    Location:
    Eastern Tennessee
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  3. Redrockmania

    Redrockmania Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    24
    Well other things intervened...But today back on the case od fitting the upgraded YSS rear shock - Success. Here's what I did (sorry no pictures):
    1. YSS shock too wide (spring diameter) so I cut the round tube cross member supporting the two parallel rear downtimes and fitted and welded a cross brace several inches higher bending forward so as to allow for the wider YSS spring.
    2. I made new steel "dog bones" (linkages) to allow for the YSS shock being slightly longer than the Sherpa original one.
    3. The one-,piece plastic moulding that makes up the air filter box and battery holder, I cut some pieces out of using a small Dremel style cutting wheel. This took a number of cuts, refitting, further cuts until I had clearance for the YSS shock. You do not have to remove much plastic to do this and do not structural weaken the plastic moulding. I then cut and bended to shape several pieces of approx 1mm thick aluminium sheet to plug the gaps my removal of plastic caused. The two pieces of Ali. sheet I then carefully glued to the plastic using a hot glue gun. The aim of the exercise is to have the modified airbag air tight. Several things to be careful of: a) leave enough space where the rubber air duct fits leading to the back of the carb so that the rubber flared end fits flush with the internal plastic of the airbag; b) make sure you leave the small inlet hole in the airbox open to allow airflow from the rubber crankcase vent tube. c) make sure you keep the slot where the air filter slides into the air filter box clear of any glue so the filter neatly fits back in.
    The Carb float height information in the Sherpa manual is unclear. The drawing of the float in situ with the measurement points marked does not match the float shape. I have just made this adjustment and remain uncertain. In the drawing distance C is 14.6mm +/- 2mm, however the location on the float to which you measure (C in the drawing) is NOT the highest part of the float. Using the drawing I have made my C point of measurement as the flat horizontal part the float, not the lowest part of the float in situ which is the apex (top / or bottom depending on how you are looking at the float) of the float. The manual never clarifies this and I am yet to find a post which does. Another thing about measurement which has preciously been mentioned, Resting the carb on a flat surface upside down sees the weight on the float depress the float spring damper in the needle spring (aka valve) which gives a different measurement than if you measure when the valve is seated but the spring is not depressed. Earlier posters suggest to get the float height measurement you hold the carb steady on its side so the the effect of weight (caused by gravity) of the float does not depress the float spring thus changing the float height measurement. Does anyone have authoritative knowledge about a) the location point on the float to which you measure distance C, and b) do you measure the float height distance when the weight of the float is depressing the float valve spring, or, with the valve closed, but with the spring fully extended (requiring the carb to be held sideways to prevent float valve spring compression. Given the challenge tuning the BST34 causes, a clear answer may assist us all in tuning our BST34's - Thanks I anticipation
  4. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    269
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    East of the West Coast
    Your float measurement is always with the tab just touching the pin, without compressing the spring.
    The measurement is from the top of the float to the flat part of the carb body where the floatbowl mates up.
    The simple way to do this procedure, is to hold the carb upside down with one hand at eye level, and maneuver the float up and down with your pinky finger, all the while positioning the float so that the tab on the float, just touches the end of the needle pin without compressing the spring. Your other hand holds the measurement tool.
  5. Redrockmania

    Redrockmania Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    24
    Thanks Windborne11 for your clarification on float height measurement. I am applying your advice on measurement. The diagram in the Sherpa Manual is misleading.
  6. bajasam

    bajasam Been here awhile

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    Feb 14, 2016
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    716
    Location:
    az
    Dont stress over getting the EXACT measurement,close works just fine,the worst that will happen is slightly richer or leaner.
  7. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

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    Aug 23, 2018
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    East of the West Coast
    Worst case is set way too high, and pisses fuel all over your father in laws new ash fault driveway...…………… Heh heh.
    OU812 and tlrmark like this.
  8. oakcutter

    oakcutter Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 27, 2018
    Oddometer:
    94
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Nice Cal, heading back from Colorado now. My buddy punctured his lung from a nasty tumble. He's ok and will recover. My Sherpa performed excellent. 22.5 pilot with 130 main worked well. High passes were no problem. I need to get me a bigger tank though as filling often is a pain in the arse when fuel is distant. Will look at your mods when I get home. Think I'll do the Puppy Dog , Adirondacks as I allowed 30 days off when I get home. Just ain't ready for work yet., Sherp-on.
    OU812 likes this.
  9. oakcutter

    oakcutter Adventurer

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    May 27, 2018
    Oddometer:
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    Massachusetts
    IMG_20190717_112542602.jpg
    Aseniya, 1stgenfarmboy, jkam and 3 others like this.
  10. Redrockmania

    Redrockmania Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    24
    This has taken some time, but the YSS shock is now fitted and my carb rebuilt. Very happy with the progressive and responsive performance of the YSS shock. The effort has been worthwhile (crossmember frame modification, Airbox modification done in the end by cutting bits out of the plastic airbag to allow the shock to fit and move, then using a hot glue gun to fill the gaps and make the airbox air tight). After the carb rebuild starting is a breeze and the engine accelerates with no "flat" spots. 132.5 main jet
    OU812 and oakcutter like this.
  11. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

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    Aug 23, 2018
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    East of the West Coast
    Why exactly did you replace the shock?
  12. dusfou

    dusfou Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Longmont, Colorado
    I'm working my way through this thread learning a lot about the sherpa. Just posted my full story of me & my GF getting into dual sport riding but here's a photo of her 2009 Super Sherpa with only 800 miles on it at the alpine loop last Fall. We love the bike. We are about done with modifications besides luggage. I'm hoping to get some time to put the new bigger pilot jet in to help with warmup but will likely leave the stock main jet as we are at altitude plus she likes to lug it still while learning to shift faster. We went 1 tooth smaller on the front sprocket to help with low speed riding and put some more off road accessories on.

    DSC_1087.JPG DSC_1037.JPG
    Aseniya, Cal, OU812 and 1 other person like this.
  13. Redrockmania

    Redrockmania Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    24
    The OEM shock is pretty ordinary - adequate for most use but at times I travel on difficult terrain, then a better shock is desirable. I fitted progressive front shock springs several years ago and that was an improvement - I also enjoy making improvements - each to their own I suppose
    Cal and tlrmark like this.
  14. AngryHandyman

    AngryHandyman Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2019
    Oddometer:
    13
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Well that was relatively short lived! I blew up my 2009 Kawasaki Super Sherpa today, after only having owned it since the winter. I was on my way to explore the Campbell River Lakes area, Loveland Bay Provincial Park in particular, when about 30 minutes into my ride from Nanaimo the bike started losing power (not a lot, just a gradual loss) and about 20 seconds later cut off completely. Didn't think too much of the power loss, as I was climbing a minor grade, I down shifted and seconds later it was over.

    I coasted over to the side of the road and did the typical quick checks for fuel, air and spark - nothing. Luckily I was only a few minutes past the Qualicum inland highway exit, and was able to be rescued by my dad from Parksville. I don't think I was waiting longer than 30 minutes. We loaded the bike into the truck and took it to his place to investigate.

    [​IMG]

    Well that explains it!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Some nicely bent valves too!

    The engine had oil in it, although it was at the lower marker. Still, it looks like the exhaust side was starved of oil and overheated. The cam and journal are shredded and scorched. I took it apart down to the bottom end and the jug and cylinder actually look OK.

    So, it's going to need new cylinder head, exhaust cam and valves at a minimum. Parts prices are not looking like a rebuild will be worth it, the bike has 56,000+ Kms on it and it's likely it'll be at least $1,500 USD in OEM parts. Canadian pricing is going to be even worse.

    So, at this point I'm thinking of parting the bike out or looking for another and keeping this as a parts bike. Too bad, even though I only had it for a few months, I really enjoyed riding it.
    tlrmark likes this.
  15. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,321
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Exhaust valve play was too tight.
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  16. AngryHandyman

    AngryHandyman Adventurer

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    Mar 27, 2019
    Oddometer:
    13
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    For sure, I never checked them after I brought the bike home, trusted the guy who sold it saying they had been in spec. Did all the other requisite maintenance, but figured I'd check them on the next interval. Lesson learned! :muutt
    tlrmark likes this.
  17. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

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    There is a SS being parted out on Kijiji Ontario right now. https://www.kijiji.ca/v-motorcycle-...le/1448657348?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
  18. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

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    Uh...….No. Definitely an oil supply issue.
  19. AngryHandyman

    AngryHandyman Adventurer

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    Mar 27, 2019
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    Vancouver Island
  20. Windborne11

    Windborne11 Been here awhile

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    East of the West Coast
    Make sure you also buy a new piston and rings, and replace the valve seals. You need to stop your oil consumption.
    tlrmark likes this.