Surprisingly high paced rides

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Flacrusher, Aug 21, 2019.

  1. Pantah

    Pantah Jiggy Dog Fan from Scottsdale Supporter

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    I rode like that when I came back into motorcycling after a 20 year hiatus. I bought a Ducati SS and rode with a loose collection of locals periodically. They liked to haul ass through the twists in New England. I knew we were behaving dangerously at the time and I was old enough to know better. Not long after I was invited to a track day at New Hampshire Speedway. It took me awhile to understand what I was trying to do. Plus I was totally exhausted by mid-afternoon! After a couple more track days with decent instruction I became at least competent enough not to be a danger to those around me. The last time I took to the track was my son's Aprilia 250 two-stroke race bike in an effort to earn a racing license. That Aprilia was a revelation! I realized then that trying to go fast on the street was not only dangerous but not really going fast. I also learned that no street rider even knows what fast is until they learn how to road race and move up the ranks.

    Today I like rolling through the twisties fast enough to feel the bike work a little bit, but not really hooligan. I still enjoy hustling a dirt road on a proper machine with knobby tires, though. But these are remote dirt roads and I leave enough room on blind turns to manage the sudden arrival of traffic. I do this in groups, but only occasionally ride with groups on the street. Often those are on the spirited side, but I don't mind letting them go and catch back up at the next stop. They don't mind me doing it either.
    #41
  2. tireatr

    tireatr Let's go for a ride

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    Let me know when your back in my backyard again and I'll show you some lesser known Gems.
    #42
  3. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    Thanks. I'm all about riding those lesser known Gems. Due to a road closed sign on 19W I found a really nice new to me road. It made me realize that probably just about every road in that area is going to be a lot of fun.
    #43
  4. redneckK20

    redneckK20 Been here awhile

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    I never group ride because every time I have, I've been disappointed by the pace. I either hang at the back being bored out of my mind or hop up front and stop to wait for 10 minutes every half hour.
    #44
  5. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    You are clearly a much more f***in awesomer rider than anyone else - or you are choosing some really sh*t riders to ride with. :dllama:
    #45
  6. redneckK20

    redneckK20 Been here awhile

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    Hard to say, most likely the latter but I haven't ridden with all that many folks so I dunno.
    #46
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  7. tireatr

    tireatr Let's go for a ride

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    Well you told me something I didn't know (19W closure). I've been riding North and East the last month due to higher temps.
    #47
  8. CheapB

    CheapB Long timer Supporter

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    This explains most any group ride I’ve ever been on :lol3

    IMG_6750.JPG

    I think what you experienced is absolutely normal. :beer
    #48
  9. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    We do that more on the dirt/gravel back roads, making the speed lower, but in relative terms sometimes "higher". No LEOs to speak of, usually no cars/trucks to speak of either. Then there are the county roads and secondary highways that are pretty exciting at speeds around 60 mph with corners recommended at 20 mph with that magic [​IMG] sign. That was the beauty of dual sport riding for us. No more 90 mph on the highway, no more pressing luck with other vehicles on the road, just us and the back roads.



    Really does suck. The reason we ride with those we know and we arrange usually with slowest at the back and we all know our limits. Same deal, stop if turning or if there may be confusion on direction to go. I often slow up on the straights to allow others to catch up. Not everyone is comfortable with how fast we may ride a dirt or gravel road.
    #49
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  10. vince82

    vince82 Been here awhile

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    That is usually my Sunday. Pretty civilized until I hit twisty open country, then fast but always with good safety margin.
    I did my share of mistakes, I have a rough idea how much I need to slow down for gravel or to avoid a bear, so I usually go the speed that I feel safe at.. It can often be over twice the speed limit.
    But only if I am far from any traffic and side roads. And only if it's twisty.
    So my rides are usually 2 hours of boring "commute to the fun", 2-3 hours of fun, 2 hours of commute back :)
    Better with others because you get to chat and enjoy the boring bits. (comms rulez)
    #50
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  11. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

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    There's no better sensation than a 70 mph 2 wheel drift on dirt, with a squirming bike being steered by the throttle.
    #51
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  12. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Is your keyborad broken?

    fuckin...... shit, mine seems to work. :imaposer
    #52
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  13. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    N*, it s@@ms t0 be w0Rk!n' p#0p@#!y to mE.
    #53
  14. Road Barnacle

    Road Barnacle Adventurer

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    I'm not going to flame you at least it's not my intention to come across that way, but this statement sounds kind of conflicted. I've been on "spirited" group rides and have "made mistakes" in my younger years that won't elaborate on, but if I learned anything from those experiences, it's that you have to listen to the feedback your mind and body are giving you. "Nerve racking" sounds a lot to me like "tense" which generally leads to being a bit stiff, a bit more prone to target fixation ... a bit more likely to "stand it up" and get all over the binders at exactly the wrong time. We're all slaves to our own ego to a certain degree and nobody wants to be that guy who makes everyone wait at the next corner, but doing so is certainly a lot less embarrassing than having to ask for a ride home on the back of somebody else's bike or trying to assure them you're "ok" while you try to bend your handle bars straight.

    I'll get off my soap box ... We all choose the risks we want to take riding. It's when we're not comfortable with those risks and we allow them to become anxiety that we invite disaster.
    #54
  15. kwthom

    kwthom Retiree apprentice - willing to learn

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    7 to 8 hours for the commute, a couple of days' worth of fun during daylight hours, followed by good bench racing at the tavern during the evenings, then that 7 to 8 hour commute back home.

    One weekend a year for me, and I've done this for a decade.
    #55
  16. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever It turns out you can't delete your account...

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    Yeah... couple of folks on this thread with that attitude. Honestly, I think if a person's sole objective for a ride is to go as fast as they personally want to go, they should ride alone. For some of us, there's more to riding motorcycles than that.
    #56
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  17. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Now with more sarcasm

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    It's all relative - one person's spirited ride is dog slow to someone else.

    Once I rode with a buddy that I ride with often and he invited a coworker that neither of us had ridden with before. The coworker in turn invited two of his friends. They all rode the same - triple digits in the straights and parked in the turns. Pretty much 180° from what we normally do.
    #57
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  18. KirkN

    KirkN Long timer Super Supporter

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    I remember reading in one of Peter Egan's Leanings books: "we keep this up, and someone's gonna be directing traffic..."

    Meaning, someone's gonna crash and the rest of us are gonna be impromptu directing traffic around the crash scene until the ambulance and tow trucks show up...

    The off-road (no traffic) equivalent was "...someone's going to be needing the Vicodin."

    Ride your own bike, ride your own ride!
    #58
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  19. st3ryder

    st3ryder Been here awhile

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    If riders don't know that they can and should ride their own pace a all times, it's a mystery, especially for "mature" riders.

    One of the privileges of getting old is you don't have to make excuses for your diminished skills/strength/power/endurance/reflexes/senses/virility that you once had so it's okay to slow down, even if that means going slower yet. The idea is to have fun, not be first. As long as you're having fun, who cares where you "finish"? Maybe the "first place winner" spent all his time at the front worried he was going to crash or getting an award as opposed to enjoying the ride. Fun is relevant: nobody else decides your fun for you.

    I'm not big on group rides and rarely go on them. Even when riding with another rider, I'll tell him "you go ahead if I'm too slow" if I'm leading, and we'll meet on the straight parts. There's a great article out there called "The Pace", that speaks to this exact issue. It's old, yes, but still relevant today, and maybe even more so now that electronic aides are fueling bravado. Especially with older riders? :-)
    #59
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  20. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    What I consider "spirited" most sport bike riders would probably consider mundane. I like anywhere from 5-20 mph over, depending on conditions. My group of riding friends has mostly quit riding street in favor of track only, but they were faster than me. No problem, though, since as others have said we all meet up at the next stop sign, gas station, restaurant, etc..

    A local adventure bike shop used to host a multi mountain pass ride called the "sport bike ride". No cruisers, no adventure bikes, etc. They were out to tear up the hills. While my Aprilia could be considered a sport bike with the right set of tires, I sat that one out.

    On the other end of the spectrum, there is a local motorcycle club that does regular rides. They are almost exclusively cruiser riders, but welcome anyone. I was going to join them on their rides, until I talked to them a bit. They said they go the speed limit or slower. They even talked about chastising one of their members (he rode something other than a cruiser, apparently) for taking off and leaving the group. I can't say I blame him. :lol3 I opted out of that one too.

    Hence, I usually ride alone.
    #60
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