Suzuki TS Thread

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by wfopete, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. JKady

    JKady Adventurer

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    Shoved all the bikes out of the garage to clean today, the little 125 looks pretty good out in the sun. Need to figure out a 21" front wheel for this thing.

    PXL_20210411_194352930.jpg
    zone47, ausfahrt, slideways and 2 others like this.
  2. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    I'm trying to get a deal figured out on a 185. Must be about a 1974 been sitting a good while.
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  3. Miguel Sanchez

    Miguel Sanchez VD #103 Supporter

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    Be careful with that - with no other changes, a 21” front wheel will affect the trail in a negative way and steering response will suffer. Raising the rear with longer shocks or lowering the front by slipping the fork tubes up in the triples will help restore factory handling.
  4. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Ive ridden one of these old TS 125's. Handling would be a word very loosely applied to one of these bikes.
    Factory handling means the frame needs to be lowered,and the swingarm lengthened and made stronger.
    Rubber band flexy flier bikes if pushed hard.

    A friend lowered the frame on his,did the swingarm,put on the factory 185 Gyt Kit and it didnt work too bad that way.
    Shocks are horrible,forks are horrible cheap things. A 21" ft wheel might help as much as it hurts handling.
    slideways likes this.
  5. slideways

    slideways España

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    If you thought the TS 125 didn’t handle well the TM 400 redefined bad handling. I had a TS 125 with a Suzuki factory hop up kit and a 21 inch front wheel. It did not handle well at all. The GYT kit was a Yamaha thing Suzuki was a factory hop up kit.
    The 185 kit actually sleeved the 185 down to a 175 as 185’s were not allowed in the 175 class.
    Below is what came with the TS125 kit.
    3418148C-58A7-438E-B94A-C836BB09F6E6.jpeg
  6. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Gyt-Kit/hop up kit,same idea. Most old japanese enduros and dirtbikes of these years were flexy fliers built to as cheap a price as could be done.
    I raced a new Super Rat for a couple years,and thought it was good.
    Then I got a Bultaco 200 Sherpa-S and wow. The first night out I could slide alllllll the way around our local shorttrack.
    Bultaco really slid nice. Didnt have any brakes to speak of but that was barely a detail.
  7. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    "Handling"...One night on a dare,a friend raced a 180 Twin Yamaha at our local shorttrack.
    We jacked around with it all day stripping junk off and trying to make it run run right. We peeled beer can tops back and hose clamped them to the end of the expansion chambers somebody had put on it. Rattle can black of course. "silencers".

    That thing was the squirmiest bounciest bike out there by a mile,the slightest hint of a slide or picking up the pace and it was all over the track.
    Sounded cool and was fun to watch.
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  8. slideways

    slideways España

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    I loved the Bultacos back then. The old Pursang was a thing of beauty. It would slide sideways better than most bikes of the time would go straight. I did get to flat track a 360 Astro that a friend of mine owned ,that was an awesome experience.
    Foot dragger likes this.
  9. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    I rode a 74 360 Bultaco Pursang one day.................wow what a cool engine. So torquey and smooth and just nice. Easy to ride and plenty fast enough.
    1974 Bultaco switched to cro-moly frames and they were way lighter than previous Bultacos.

    Guys are dumping 15K and up now in the Astro Cup bikes for big time flattrack races. More than 15K for some.
    They go pretty fast.
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  10. JKady

    JKady Adventurer

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    I don't push the little thing hard enough to notice much if any handling difference, it just looks awkward as heck with the mini size front and a full size rear. Raising the rear wouldn't be terribly difficult and it does need shocks anyway.
  11. chardog1971

    chardog1971 Been here awhile

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    20210517_195417.jpg 20210516_113322.jpg 20210516_113231.jpg Had to fix the broken weld on the exhaust. I still need to paint and find the exhaust donut. Im not even sure whats supposed to be there. I need a part diagram.
  12. wfrpalm

    wfrpalm Been here awhile

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    You can find diagrams at any of the online parts dealers.
  13. chardog1971

    chardog1971 Been here awhile

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    Yeah, I found one when i was looking for parts for my DRZ. I repainted the exhaust and am in the process of cleaning everything else in the area.
    It looks like ill be doing a lot of that. It is pretty dirty.
  14. zone47

    zone47 Adventurer

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    Cool thread.

    I have some TS experience to offer.

    I bought a 71 TS185 off my dad when I was about 14 or so. It was the green with white stripe color, had a luggage rack and that was about it. I did a few little mods here and there, mainly put a knobby on the back for hill climbs and some paint work. It was a great bike. I blew it up one time because I probably ran it too hard (extended 55 mph) so stuffed a Wisco teflon racing piston in there and that fixed everything back up. I once found a Hooker header for it and slapped in on there but it didn't really give it much power, just way louder which was cool at the time. (I was just at Mid Oh and found one there for $150, but thought that was too much). Anyway, it was a great bike and I'll post some pix.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    TS#2 I sold the 185 and was looking for more power. I found a 73 TS250 and thought that was the ticket but it was heavier and really didn't seem to have much more grunt than the 185. It didn't handle as well and then I found that the frame was cracked, so I got rid of it. No photo on this one but it was yellow.

    TS#3 I moved out to California at age 21 and found a 74 TS185 out there with bent forks for cheap. I found a guy that could straighten them and I don't know how he did it but they looked perfect. It was a fun bike but not as cool looking as the 71 as I liked the chrome and stripes on the original. Still cool no matter.
    [​IMG]

    TS#4 Found a 76 TS250 at a yard sale with only 800 miles for $600 (which was a pretty good deal back in 1980) That was a really nice ride, I was afraid to get it dirty or muddy so kept it on the street. Sold it and made some bucks after about 6 months.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    TS#4 I knew I was headed for Texas (that's mainly why I sold the 76 250) and found a beater 72 185. It was pretty much all there but needed some tuning up. I took it down to Tx and it was a great way to get around and explore my new turf. I discovered a shut down motocross track (Rabbit Run in Plano, Tx) and it was amazing! I would race guys out there who had real dirt bikes and could give some of them a run for their money but I ended up crashing too much, so sold it and bought an ex pro set up 79 RM125.

    [​IMG]

    TS#5 I got married and talked the wife into riding motorcycles. I found a nice 76 TS185 for her to learn on. She dumped it once and that pretty much was it for her learning to ride. I sold it to someone who hopefully appreciated it.

    [​IMG]

    TS#6 So with Japanese motorcycles flying out of Japan in the 80s and beyond with new innovations each year, it was too good to pass up some of the awesome new tech, so I enjoyed all that for a while.
    I pretty much gave up riding when I turned 60 a few years ago, but when I saw this 74 TS185 at Mid Oh swap meet and for only $850 and 3,400 original miles, I had to buy it. Most 185s are up around $1500-$2500 now, it's crazy! So I need fork seals, new tires, a tach or somehow fix that one, and a Stanley 001-1068 6V sealed beam. The chrome is great, no pitting at all! I'm going to refinish the paint on it and do some detailing. It will be a good bike to putt around the back roads on.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for reading this long winded TS story if you did, and if you didn't it's ok, I won't hold it against you. :yum
  15. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic Supporter

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    The 185 was a sweet spot in the TS line.
    zone47 and slideways like this.
  16. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    Someone tossed this in our scrap bin a few weeks ago, it's a TF125...that's a farm bike. I've got a TF100 somewhere. I don't think there is anything worth salvaging, but I got the CDI anyway.

    IMG_20210629_160234.jpg
    zone47 likes this.
  17. Dualsport4ever

    Dualsport4ever Long timer Supporter

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    The TF125 is a cool bike (pic below). My current (and awaiting restoration/rebuilding) TS 125 is a 1981 (Canada) model. To my amazement, the Australian TF125 looks to have the exact same motor, and other bits, still in production.

    Suzuki TF125.jpg
  18. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    The Yamaha AG100 predates the TF farmbikes.
  19. zone47

    zone47 Adventurer

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    Has anyone converted their TS125/185/250/400 from a 6 volt to a 12 volt system? I think all it would take is a 12 volt regulator and 12 volt bulbs ... but! I think the PEI would need to remain at 6 volts, does that sound right? :scratch
  20. RockyRue

    RockyRue Long timer

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    The 1974 TC185 is 12v system
    Maybe look at that for differences / parts
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