Symba

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by uraldog, May 24, 2009.

  1. HelloPitty

    HelloPitty Motorbike Enthusiast

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    If I were driving in lots of stop and go, I'd likely want a CVT.

    I've owned a Ruckus, but sold it. Mine was carbureted though, it was a 2008. It seemed slow to me, but then I was comparing it to a Vespa LX150 at that time, so not really fair to the Ruckus.
    JerryH is right the Symba is manual shift, no clutch on the left handlebar, just a rocker-style foot shifter. It can get off the line fairly quick....I'd likely start it in second gear, since first to second gear happens so fast.

    If I were going to buy a capable little CVT, I'd be looking for a 2010 Honda Elite. I think the size, quickness, underseat storage capacity make it a nice well-rounded scooter. This is my impression from posts I've read, I don't own one, but would like to find one to add to my scooter collection. Plus, there are lots of "how to fix it" videos on YouTube thanks to DaBinChe and others who have posted them.

    My former Ruckus, gone, but not forgotten.
    IMG_0041.JPG
  2. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    Just to confuse the issue further, the bike I'm considering against the Symba is the Honda Grom. More expensive, but also more power, has fuel injection, and can go off-road. Also, it's still being sold in the USA.
    http://powersports.honda.com/2015/grom.aspx

    Actually, I'd definitely get the Symba, if it was still being built.
  3. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    There are still quite a few new Symbas at dealers in the U.S. that you could likely get a good deal on. Parts availability is what would worry me. I have had problems getting parts for my HD200, it would likely be a lot worse for an SYM bike no longer in production.

    The Grom seems a bit overpriced to me, especially when compared to some of the deals out there locally. A new Grom is $3299. For $3495 you can get a Suzuki Burgman 200 or a Yamaha Majesty 400. For $2999 you can get a Suzuki TU250 or a Suzuki DR200. For $3199 you can get a Honda CB300F or Rebel 250. All new. I haven't considered a Grom because I am way too big for one, and they just don't have enough top speed for my needs. But if a Grom suits your needs and you are willing to pay for it, get one. They are very high quality bikes with a lot of modification potential.
  4. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    Those all look like good choices, and the Grom IS overpriced, but I don't think riders looking for a Symba would want something that heavy. My wife doesn't like riding my Yamaha XT250, because she thinks it's too heavy (291 lb). I think I could sell her on an XT225, like yours (238 lb), but haven't found one around here, yet. If Honda would bring the Wave 110 to the US, I'd snap one up (218 lb in UK, but emissions crap for the US might add a bit), though the price could be close to the Grom price.

    Weights of bikes listed:
    Burgman 200: 359 lb
    Majesty 400: 467 lb (list price: $6850)
    TU250: 326 lb
    DR200: 278 lb
    CB300F: 348 lb
    Rebel 250: 331 lb

    Grom: 225 lb
    .
  5. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    The Majesty especially stands out as the deal of the century, as you can get one here for $4100 OTD, nearly $3000 below MSRP. I went back and looked at it 3 times, and was headed to the bank to get the money when I changed my mind. Yes, I wanted it. And it was an unbelievable deal. But what would I do with it? Too big for city use, where the HD200 I already have excels. It would be mostly a freeway ride, and that is why I have my Vulcan 750. I doubt the Majesty would be any more comfortable, and it would be a whole lot slower. The Vulcan makes more than 60 hp. I didn't need two freeway rides, and the HD200 has proven sufficient for shorter freeway rides, especially on the wide open highways around here. I wouldn't want to ride it on the New Jersey Turnpike though. So either the Vulcan or the Majesty would just sit. Great deal, but I wouldn't really gain anything. I would regret it as soon as the new wore off.

    As for the Symba, it should be a lot easier for a beginner or smaller person to ride than a Grom, with it's low seat height, low COG, and step through frame. The PCX150 should also be a good ride for someone uncomfortable with a higher seat. And what about the HD200? I have no problems getting on and off that (the only problem I have with the XT225 is the seat height) I have orthopedic issues that make getting on and off difficult. For many new riders, the seat height is a bigger problem than the size or weight of the bike. They like being able to get on and off easily, and being able to flat foot it at a stop.
  6. kiw432

    kiw432 n00b

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    symbas are a great scooter i bought one for my wife, but have ended up using it more myself. Its a great round towner so maneuverable. Lots of comments from people about how cute it is not sure if thats a good thing. I would say it is a excellent choice for a beginner, the scooter itself is great I have close to 20,000kms on mine already. She had a Yamaha BWS before but it was a tad to high. She didn't enjoy riding motorcycles so we decieded on the symba.

    My other recommendation if you want a small cc motorcycle would be the sym wolf 150. I know its not a scooter but it is also a great bike. Small very light and easy to maintain. I often take mine rather than something bigger as I just enjoy how much fun a small bike is on mountain roads. Love taking it touring as in Taiwan most of the speed limits are 70km perfect for a small motorcycle. I know people that have put well over 100,000kms on them they are great bikes if looked after. Not sure what the whole hype is over the grom as I didn't really enjoy it. But that is just my point of view :)

    The biggest problem is not what SYM makes, it is its customer service. There are plenty of aftermarket and sym made parts for these two. Even if they stop making them they will be around for at least 10 years. In taiwan they are great, when I need parts for either my Wolf or Symba almost any motorcycle shop can get whatever I need within a day or two. Now overseas they don't seem to communicate or organise that part very well. Some of you might think is just SYM. But I deal with other Taiwan companies selling goods overseas and they have the same problem. Customers need parts to fix something or have ideas to improve something. But they just are not helpful. Am not sure why, but I hope they can improve that. As I feel they are a company definitely with more potential. If you do need any symba parts that you can't get feel free to ask. As I live in Taiwan and have a passion for these small bikes.

    [​IMG]
    Chillis, tastroman and HelloPitty like this.
  7. HelloPitty

    HelloPitty Motorbike Enthusiast

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    kiw432, nice bike and countryside!
    Is it possible to get a photo of the front of the bike and one of the speedometer?
    Is yours fuel injected? I see an added part/cover in front of the gas tank.
  8. kiw432

    kiw432 n00b

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    Yup she is fuel injected. I think it was in 2008 or 9 that all new motorcycles here had to be fuel injected. So all the symbas that were made for the local market were fuel injected. The one before the symba is very similar most parts are interchangeable but was not fuel injected a little bit like the honda cub. They produced it for 30 years or so making very few changes. I am not sure when they added the cover as am still learning about the different versions.

    When I bought it the person had left it out in the rain for a couple years. Shes still needing some rust doubt with but apart from that a solid little thing.

    Its a beautiful island to travel around. So small but still so much to see anyways.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    HelloPitty likes this.
  9. HelloPitty

    HelloPitty Motorbike Enthusiast

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    Thank you for the great pics of your bike! I wish mine was fuel injected, but other than that, I love my Symba.
    Here's mine:
    Screen Shot 2015-12-06 at 12.15.03 PM.png
  10. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I would like to have a Symba, it would be a nice companion to my Stella. I love the drum front brake. Pretty much a Honda Super Cub. They definitely have looks, at least IMO. I would have to have the long seat, when I sat on one at a dealer, I sat right on top of the bar that divides the seats. As for the parts issue, I blame Alliance for most of that. SYM makes an excellent product, and I'm sure they also make parts. And I'm sure the dealers would be happy to sell you the parts if they could get them. I have read on the SYM forum that Alliance does not really want to sell parts to customers, but only to dealers when they need them to fix a bike. In other words, Alliance does not like the idea of owners working on their own bikes. I have no idea whether this is actually true or not, just something I read on the forum.
  11. Phipsd

    Phipsd Older but not wiser.

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    I would think that it is likely getting harder to sell the Symba in much of Asia. Cheap Chinese copies are getting better, and it would be hard to compete and still make a profit.
  12. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    JerryH says the Passport stomps the 50cc Ruckus. I have a Passport and had a Symba. The Symba is a Suzuki Gs1100 nitro drag bike compared to a Passport.
  13. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    The Symba has 100cc, the Passport only had 70cc. But I think the bigger difference is the manual shift. A Passport shifted at full throttle and high rpm should get up to speed much faster than a CVT at full throttle. And the Ruckus seems to be one of the slowest CVT 50cc out there. A first generation Honda Met will outrun it, and a 2 stroke Zuma 50cc leaves it for dead. The Zuma was a rocket ship as far as acceleration was concerned. It could leave a light about as fast as 4 wheeled traffic. It was only when it reached about 25 mph that it began to slow down. Much of that initial acceleration was likely due to the 2 stroke motor
  14. Birdmove

    Birdmove Long timer

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    I thought the Symba was 110cc's of snarling horsepower??
  15. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I have seen the Symba referred to both as a 100cc and a 110cc. While looking for a seat, I found one that says it fits a Symba 110. So I don't know what the deal is. But I did find one at a local dealer for a great price, and am seriously considering buying it. Tires, chain, battery, light bulbs, etc. should be available anywhere, and there are tons of Symba parts on eBay. Should be enough to keep one going for quite some time, unless you crash it. My guess is body parts might become hard to find pretty quickly. I don't know if anything is actually shared between the Symba and the Passport or not.
  16. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    The new Symbas in the US are called Symba 100, and the specs say they have 101.4 ccs.

    Couldn't find any specs older than 2014, but maybe you're thinking of the Honda Wave 110.

    Edit: OK, did a more thorough search. All Symbas in the US have been 101.4 ccs, since they came here in 2009. Sym now lists a Symba 125 on their global site:
    http://www.sym-global.com/product/index/220/49
    However it also has 101.4 ccs.

    Edit: just changed that link to the correct one.
  17. HelloPitty

    HelloPitty Motorbike Enthusiast

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    Hi BMWzenrider, just curious how you are getting on with the Symba.
  18. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar Supporter

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    It has been sitting in the garage here in Wisconsin as snow has been swirling around (off & on) for the last few months. They are even saying that we could get some snow showers overnight tonight. :doh

    On the couple of days when it has been warm enough to get out into the garage I have played with trying to tune the carburetor to get it to run decently, but so far have not been able to get it past 45mph on level ground with my 180lb carcass on board.

    I have mounted an electric tachometer to help with tuning, and have found that above 6500rpm the tach goes haywire, so am now suspecting that it may be the CDI box or coil since the tach is picking up pulses from the spark plug wire for its signal.
  19. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I have changed my mind about the Grom. It is bigger and far more robust. It has much wider tires, and a real clutch. plus 25cc more. It will keep up with my XT225 and Royal Enfield 500 on the road, though it is not freeway legal. And despite all the Youtube videos to the contrary, I do not believe it to be capable of real off road use like a dirt bike or dual sport. It might be for a while, but I think the pounding would soon make it fall apart. However, for non city use, I believe it is superior to any 125cc CVT scooter, and pretty much all of the small displacement bikes people have taken, and attempted to take long trips on. I can't help but wonder how well that couple that rode round the world on Symbas would have done had they been riding Groms. I wonder how that Wan guy from Total Ruckus would have made out on a Grom instead of a Ruckus. Here in the U.S. the Grom seems to mostly be a toy for wealthy teenagers to dump money into making mods. But I think a slightly modified Grom, mostly modified to carry things, and maybe a change of tires for the kind of terrain they plan to ride on, would make an excellent adventure bike. I've been waiting for someone to try and ride one around the world. I don't understand why someone hasn't done it yet.
  20. gunnabuild1

    gunnabuild1 Long timer

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    Personally I think they are made for different things,the Grom is for rich [relatively] westerners to play with,where the Symba is made as a practical urban/rural runabout that will replace a car for a great many things.
    Leg guards keep clothing clean on messy road surfaces,the various rack systems will be useful for carrying/strapping gear/goods,there is a reason it is pretty much interchangeable with a 60 year old motorcycle that put the third world on wheels.
    And it can be fixed by any half decent guy/gal with a spanner.And it probably won't need to see them very often either.