Tell me about vinyl siding

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by rufus, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Can you link me to them? They didn't use joint covers on my house, but I may on my garage extension.
    #21
  2. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Paint doesn't last forever is the point. You still need to do some maintenance.

    If the paint chips for some reason you have to deal with it or it becomes damp sawdust in a year or so. We have a shed on the property we brought two years back, was a kids play house and is now storage and best guess was 10 years old or so. The paint was mostly O.K. but in a few places it had been chipped, painting was cheap but I've seen a lot of places where the owner didn't bother and in a few years it falls apart.
    #22
  3. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Paint on Hardie board lasts a long long time because it soaks in the paint better than any wood. Of course it doesn't last forever, but far longer than it does on other products. I'll still take Hardie board over an other siding.
    #23
  4. Ogre_fl

    Ogre_fl Long timer

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    My house has vinyl on it and its 17 years old.
    Held up to the eye of a cat 5 hurricane....not a single piece missing or damaged....just saying.
    #24
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  5. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Man, those pictures....my heart would sink if I came home to that!

    Maybe someone will design vinyl roof panels soon. I'm tired of toting a bundle of shingles on to the roof every time the wind kicks up. :D But like you, we've never lost a piece of siding.
    #25
  6. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    Hardie does not recommend jointbcovers, there is an adhesive joint flashing they recommend, you supplier should have it
    #26
  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    I'm confused then. Why did you mention them?
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  8. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    I guess I installed mine wrong. It looks great. I did also flash behind the seam so I did that right. It still looks good
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  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    OK, wait, did you use joint covers or flashing?
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  10. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    Both, I used the tape t
    You seal windows, I had a bunch given to me behind the seam and then then some formed metal cover that hung from a single nail. If I still owned the house I would take a picture.
    #30
  11. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    :thumb

    Mine is flashed and caulked, which is my intent for my garage extension.
    #31
  12. Houstrom46

    Houstrom46 Adventurer

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    Previous owners had vinyl installed on my house in the early '90s, and I paid dearly to fix the damage it caused after 20 years. In addition to misc cracks & chips from the weed wacker over the years, every single window that had exposure to the elements (i.e. not covered by a porch) had rot in various stages around the window frames. It was an opportunity for me to replace the windows with double panes since I had to have them all removed anyway to fix the rot, but I would have come out cheaper in the long run if the previous owner had gone with Hardy plank instead of cutting corners with the cheap vinyl. In the end I installed Hardy Plank so I don't have to mess with it again.
    #32
  13. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    Hail seems to shred vinyl siding.

    I thought Hardie was basically concrete siding and was mostly indestructible. It's a bit dismaying to learn that it degrades if not painted.

    T1-11 is what contractors use to save time and money. It lasts about ten years, then rots away.
    #33
  14. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Problem is, concrete will do the same. It needs to be sealed as well. The difference is, Hardie siding is thin and semi-porous, concrete is thicker and semi-porous. Think of Hardie Siding like stucco. If you do not paint stucco it will disintegrate over time as well.
    #34
  15. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    Structural stone is the way to go, but no one can afford it any more.
    #35
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  16. Yam2Yam2

    Yam2Yam2 Adventurer

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    Built our house 28 years ago. Gray vinyl siding on three sides (E, S, W). Street side has cedar. Cedar needed restaining after 12 years. I put 3-4 thick coats on, it still looks like new.

    Vinyl hasn't been touched, except for spraying the E side last weekend with bleach/soap mixture to wash off the alge (shaded by tall pines, no ventilation). It looks fantastic, all around. No rotted windows (that is due to poor installation).
    #36
  17. BillMoore

    BillMoore Been here awhile Supporter

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    That is my thought, if vinyl siding is causing rot around windows, those windows weren't properly flashed in the first place.
    #37
  18. rooster shooter

    rooster shooter motorcycle cowboy

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    The only down side to vinyl siding that I have found is that it mildews. Pretty easy to clean though.
    #38
  19. south

    south Been here awhile

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    I think it's worth noting that the basic operating principle/prevailing mindset of exterior wall finish cladding is that it is NOT the be-all, end-all, 100% waterproof barrier for the structure; while it can be made to be (virtually) so via extra measures taken during installation, the primary function of cladding is promoted as a cosmetically appealing overall barrier to weather factors in general--sun, wind, (much of the) rain/precipitation, etc. as well as holding up to minor physical contacts/impacts. Which is to say, its function is to take the brunt of the outside world while looking good doing it.

    But as far as 100% water-tightness/proofing goes, the final measure of that task has been allocated to the underlying layer(s): housewrap, sealing/flashing tapes, etc. The present view is that the exterior layers of a structure function together as a system--sheathing, (insulation, if used), moisture barrier, air gap, and (cosmetic and protective) cladding.

    Which is all to say, selecting the best cladding--stucco; T1-11 (cheap and horrible as it is); vinyl, wood, fiber cement, or PVC siding; etc.--and achieving the best result for your application entails a full(er) understanding of the entire system(s) to be employed and various factors at play--i.e., durability under (highly) specific prevailing conditions. Each type of cladding has its strengths and weaknesses which need to be factored into the prevailing/typical environmental conditions as well as the state/circumstances of the structure onto which you propose to install it.

    For example, I live in Florida, so my primary concerns are sun, termites/damaging bugs (FL is the bug capital of the world), and high (tropical storm/hurricane) winds. Yes, FL is humid and, in season, subject to heavy rain, and I'm not far from the sea, but it isn't what I would characterize as a particularly "damp" environment because the sun pops right back out after the rain and bakes everything dry in no time--i.e., there's no "winter wetness" to contend with. So, I chose fiber cement when I re-sided the house. If I lived in an environment less prone to high storm winds, I might opt for vinyl siding instead--especially if I was concerned about prolonged damp conditions taking a toll on the cladding itself--but only if it could be installed over a fully moisture and bug-proof underlayer, since, while the vinyl itself is impervious to water and insects, due to its requirement to permit a fair amount of movement, vinyl siding is a much "looser fit" than other cladding; it can effectively manage/channel reasonable, straightforward rainwater, but wind, wind-blown rain, and insect intrusion can be problematic. And, unfortunately, one thing it (also) does very well is hide the evidence of such intrusion if/when it occurs--since, again, it allows for it to happen by the very nature of its installation methodology rather than solely as a consequence of (visible) damage.
    #39
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  20. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    Did you discover the reason for the 6" bottom rot? Do you have gutters or is the rain water just splashing the ground? Do you have a 12"-16" overhang on the peaked ends? If no gutters, whatever you put on will need to be redone in fairly short order. If no overhang on peaked ends, the siding below the peaks is exposed to excess rain and may not shed it properly.
    #40