Tent recommendations

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by minisoda, Aug 13, 2019 at 5:14 AM.

  1. minisoda

    minisoda Been here awhile

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    Currently running a small cabelas 2 man tent. Very easy setup and fairly light but it’s quite long for packing.

    Any recommendations for a system that has the following features?

    - integrated rainfly. I use it 100% of the time and don’t like the extra step in setup.

    - poles < 17” length

    - good headroom

    - 2 man

    - not overly concerned on weight. The 1200GSA can handle a lot.

    - quick and easy setup


    GO!
    #1
  2. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    An integrated rainfly will put you in some rare territory. I don't know of a tent like that.

    On the other hand, I came across a steal that is worth looking into. Big5 Sporting Goods sells a 2-Man tent. In other words, it is a one-person tent with enough room inside to fit all your gear and be comfortable enough to sit up inside.


    Boulder Creek Hiker 2 Dome Tent
    [​IMG]

    List price is $49. However, I found it on sale...and then I had a $10 off coupon. The price came out to be $19.99, or $25 with tax.

    I took it with me a couple weeks ago and compared an MSR tent against it. The MSR didn't seem as well made, yet sold for about 5 times the price.

    Your choice, obviously. I just feel like I scored on this one. :D

    Chris
    #2
  3. Emmett

    Emmett Been here awhile Supporter

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    https://hilleberg.com/eng/tent/2-person-tents/ Hilleberg tents have external pole sleeves which allows you to set up your tent in one go.

    Hilleberg makes tents of various designs, fabric strength, and offer them in three colors.

    You might want to check out the Staika or the Niak models

    What you do is clip the groundcloth, tent, and fly together when you get the tent. When you show up at your camp site, unroll the tent, insert the poles, stake it out, go in, fall asleep.

    If you want, you can get an inner mesh tent to use in hot weather instead of the regular fabric tent. You can use the inner mesh tent solo, or have the rain fly to throw over the tent if rain comes.

    These tents are expensive, but well worth it. Hilleberg provides excellent service, spare parts etc.
    #3
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  4. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Lots of single wall tents made for ultralight backpacking,climbing.
    Look at LightheartGear,Tarptent,Nemo,etc.
    You will need to up your budget quite a bit.

    JR356
    #4
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  5. Krautwagen

    Krautwagen Adventurer

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    Single wall tents also have issues with condensation and contact wetting. Being paranoid about rolling into a wall or a bag touching the side isn't worth the setup savings and wallet lightening.
    #5
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  6. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    #6
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  7. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    Single wall tents are rarely comfortable. They will let you unzip, throw all your stuff in, zip up and get organized in a torrential downpour from inside. This works and... sucks.
    #7
  8. GR8ADV

    GR8ADV Safety Second!

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    Hilleberg. End of your search.

    If you mountain bike it is kind of like a Chris King headset. Just do and forget about it. They are the best.
    #8
  9. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Any of the 'Multi Pitch' Macpac tents are also really good for quick setup. They have pole sleeves like the Hillebergs so the fly & tent can stay joined together. Slide in the poles, stomp in 4 pegs & you have an erection. :D My well travelled Minaret has poles a shade under 17" but it doesn't exactly have a lot of headroom.

    Cheers
    Clint
    #9
  10. GSbyname

    GSbyname Adventurer

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    Exped Venus II. $$$ but flawless for moto touring in all weathers.
    #10
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  11. Tor

    Tor Imported Norwegian

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    Big Agnes Seedhouse 2. As far as integrated rainfly, I also have a Hilleberg Nallo GT3 (they make a Nallo 2 as well). This tent has the inner tent and rainfly clipped together, and I leave it in when I pack. The only reason I take the inner tent off the rainfly is when I change the inner tent to a full mesh. Usually I keep the "winter" version in.

    You're looking at a completely different price point and build quality though. The GT3 is around $850-$900. Its a 4-season, with the fly going all the way to the ground. The drawback of this is a little less ventilation through the tent at night. This is not a free-standing tent, and requires stake-down in both ends. I love this tent. Extremely durable.
    #11
  12. Andy_L

    Andy_L Been here awhile

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    I find it really interesting to see the different design philosophy between American and European tents. If the OP is in a cool-ish, wet climate similar to northern Europe, then maybe European tent manufacturers are the place to look, as the "pitch as one" integrated design is very common. Obviously with this type the fly is the structural part so you lose the ability to pitch just the inner. Vango, Vaude, Robens, Coleman are a few of the makers with some decent products. The Coleman Europe (www.coleman.eu) tent designs are quite different to the US parent company's. The Coleman Phad used to have a real following in motorcycle camping circles, but no good for taller people unfortunately. Looks like it's now been replaced with a model called the Tatra. I just bought a Robens Voyager, but I'm yet to try it out so not in a position to recommend it or not. It seems well made and well specified, as it should be at the price.
    #12
  13. DSquared

    DSquared Dilly Dilly! Supporter

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    If your current tent meets all those needs and the only issue is pole length, buy new poles with shorter sections.

    You can order them here or I think I got a set from Amazon
    https://tentpoletechnologies.com/
    #13
  14. BoilerRealm

    BoilerRealm Been here awhile

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    This would be my choice for eastern side of the US. If strictly out west, it would be a tarptent double rainbow.
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  15. scratchypants

    scratchypants Loathes the impolite

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    I have the Scarp II and I am very happy with it. I sent them an email as I don't see it on their site and they said it was discontinued for 2019 due to production capacity issues. Based on my experience, I'd give the double rainbow a try, with the additional liner. Otherwise the Hogback is the 4-person version of the Scarp II.
    #15
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  16. minisoda

    minisoda Been here awhile

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    Thank you for all the thoughtful feedback! Went to REI last night and looked over quite a few different options. At the end of the day, I chose the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 Bikepack. The interior space is perfect and it literally packs down to 12x4”! I would imagine you give up some durability in the fabric, but it will work perfectly for my needs. Setup was extremely fast and easy.
    #16
  17. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Redverz....
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  18. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    Good choice.

    I have the copper spur 1 ul, ...it's worth the extra money to buy their footprint....the floor fabric is delicate the extra protection of the footprint is worth the $

    Also ..I feel the MSR mini stakes are lighter and nicer than the factory stakes...that is what I use.


    Scott
    #18
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  19. Krautwagen

    Krautwagen Adventurer

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    Their new bikepacker footprint with the vestibule floor is pretty cool. I had to send them a note asking them to please put out a short pole/waterproof sack/extended footprint upgrade kit for my Copper Spur HV UL3. I can't justify two ultralight tents and need the big one for when the dogs come backpacking with the Mrs and I.
    #19
  20. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    I agree, the bikepacker is pretty cool. But at roughtly $500 by the time you get the footprint...wow. I'll take the $20 Boulder Creek tent from Big 5 any day.

    The "system" stoves come to mind when I think of the bike packer tent. When I want a stove, I want a stove. I picked up a tiny stove on eBay for about $10 that is self-igniting, and does what I need it to do, which is boil water. It packs into a space about the size of a deck of cards. I could've bought a Jet Boil system stove for $100...but it doesn't boil water any better.

    Getting back to tents, the OP's requirement was to have the rainfly as part of the tent itself...and the $500 tent still has a separate rain fly.

    Chris
    #20