Texas to Montana! Part Deux: The Return...

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by LoneStar, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Here's a link to my previous Grammy, Pulitzer, Oscar and Nobel Peace Prize winning ride report describing my trip to Montana from Texas...

    Texas to Montana!

    If you haven't read it yet you'll be biting your nails with excitement reading it. :evil

    Day 1: Stevensville, MT to Grangeville, ID


    Got a late afternoon start today on the beginning of my return trip to Texas. I left Stevensville with the Bitterroot Valley shrouded in smoke and haze from multiple forest fires. I could barely make out the mountains through the haze as I rode through the heat north on 93 to Lolo Pass / Hwy 12. The area has been in a tremendous heat wave and it feels like Texas - and I thought I'd get to enjoy cool mountain air for a couple of weeks LOL. Oh well...

    I had a blast in the area, getting to have a few adventures and a lot of fun in the process. My last day there we headed up into the mountains to pick huckleberries and spent an afternoon scavenging the minimal harvest this year. We were heavily protected ;-) since we were competing with bears for the little tangy berries. It was hot and the dust on the fire roads was fine powder several inches deep, coating all of us on the way. We eventually found a few berries (enough to pour over ice cream :) and ran into the biggest crop dead center in a bear area - lots of torn up stumps and bear droppings on the trail. Kinda got that funny feeling one was near so we headed out and pigged out on ice cream.


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    Lolo Pass was beautiful as I swept through the turns early on. I'd been warned of the moose in the area and the fact that a rider had been killed just a few days ago trying to avoid one. Each blind corner of the twisty road brought a beautiful view and also a sense of concern, knowing the narrow road could instantly be filled with a deer or moose from the brush at the sides. I entered a blind curve, only to see in the midst of it scraped asphalt and skid marks from both directions, a large stain of oil and two large stains, surrounded by orange spray painted investigation marks outlining the path of the crash. Whatever happened here it only served to remind me of the seriousness of riding - a reality check.

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    As I rounded another bend, a large helicopter came lifting out of the river with a huge water pouch beneath it, water dripping as it flew away to attack a fire somewhere near, the mist and spray of the water hitting me as it went overhead.

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    It's not a mistake... it's "art" :D
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    The pass is truly a beautiful road, but also one that keeps you on your toes. There are a lot of blind corners and little shoulder so you stay busy and alert. Each corner seemed to be a challenge today, with a huge tandem trailer coming around the curve halfway in my lane - each of us passing only an arms length apart. The road had a fair amount of traffic with winds high and gusty. The loaded bike kept me busy with the log trucks adding waves of turbulence to the windy gusts. In addition road crews had been dumping asphalt on the inside of corners and about every 5th turn I'd suddenly find myself on loose gravel... Huge thunderheads were building and by the time I reached Lowell it had gotten very dark in the middle of the afternoon. I stopped and put on my rain gear, timing it perfectly as the rain hit as soon as I got back on the road.

    These guys are not your friends...
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    It rained steadily all the way to Kooskia where it finally stopped and needed a break. I grabbed a cup of coffee after parking the bike and laying my gear on the seat, only to see a massive downpour hit the street, dumping huge amounts of rain on the bike and my gear. I ran out to try and grab it, finally starting the bike and jumping the curb to get it out of the rain but it was too late. I was so soaked I went back into the restaurant sopping with water and wrung out as much as possible in the bathroom.

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    Eventually the rain slacked off and I geared up again, heading south on 13 towards Grangeville. The rain returned in sheets and I could tell 13 was a gorgeous ride but in the rain and tension I couldn't see much. A few miles out of Grangeville the rain became sporadic but the fog came rolling in covering the high switchback areas.

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    I finally hit sunshine to warm my soaked Levi's as I cleared the mountains and approached Grangeville.

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    I was a little ragged from the rain and the ride and decided to spend the night in Grangeville. Lolo Pass / Hwy 12 is a beautiful road as is 13, and I'd love to ride it again in good weather :thumbup

    By the time I got checked in and my gear drying it was about 10 til 9 pm and I went downtown to get a bite to eat. All the restaurants closed at 9 but one let me in right at 9, much to the chagrin of the teenage waitresses who were anxious to go home :D. Kathy was the manager of her mother's place, Barb's Cafe, and we chatted a long time while they made me a great BLT with fries. She discussed the heat wave and the best route to Boise as well as some other great riding areas around.


    The Route:
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    Tomorrow I'll head south on 55 or 95 and see what happens... :D
    #1
  2. bigskydrift

    bigskydrift dual sport hooligan

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    Glad to see you made it across 12 & 13 without any problems Lonestar! Thats the problem with these "scenic" roads, they seem to require much more rider attention, causing you to miss some of it all....great pics and continuing report, I will continue to "ride" with you back to Texas.
    Enjoy and be safe man-
    #2
  3. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    This morning I left Grangeville and headed south on 95 towards Boise. A couple miles out of town I saw a sign for a woolly Mammoth discovery and headed off onto gravel roads in search of the site. I guess the state decided not to put a sign at the site because I never found it and ended up looping back to 95 on a 7 mile detour.

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    Outside Grangeville it was flat farm country, but it soon began to get interesting and 95 turned out to be a great road. The smoke of many forest fires obscured the stunning views, but it still was a great ride. Highly suggested route!

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    The smoke from forest fires obscured the majestic views
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    I raced on south to White Bird and the Indian battlefield. Some fabulous scenery on this ride. I detoured to the battlefield and some side roads.

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    Part of the battlefield where the Nez Perce kicked butt on the U.S. Cav
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    White Bird
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    Stopping for a Coke at the local souvenir shop, I was startled to see the Pig being attacked by a fiberglass grizzly.

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    As the heated battle between the ferocious grizz and my Bavarian pig raged on, I was blindsided and knocked to the ground by a herd of jackelopes, who held me down while a whistle-pig took the last $5 out of my wallet. Shaken by the incident and fearing a snipe attack, or worse, drop-bears, I took off for more southernly regions and higher heat.


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    The twisties took me through a few small towns and finally Riggins, where there were a lot of river rafting companies and it looked like a cool place to stay the night. Next time I'll plan to stay there.

    Bad to da bone river boat
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    The rugged landscape in the area is known to contain some "independent" folks, and the signs reminded me...

    I think I'll call this highway "Route 666".
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    I wanted to attend their church service, but since all I could bring on the bike trip was an Uzi and 12" Bowie knife I didn't want to feel underdressed.



    More road construction
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    I finally reached the junction of 55 and 95 at New Meadows and pulled in to top off the tank. To the side I saw an old blue Beemer parked under a tree with the rider sitting at a picnic table. I pulled over and introduced myself. "Rouch" shook hands and we started talking bikes. He lived in the area and was in New meadows checking out an old Harley panhead for a friend. Rouch had recently bought the 1974 R900 with 80K on it and had mainly ridden Harley pan heads previous to the Beemer. He was enjoying the bike and planned to take it on a ride from Idaho through Canada and down to New York City in the late summer. He suggested some rides and also that I continue on 95 instead of 55. A wairess had suggested 55 to Boise but Rouch said it was congested with trucks and construction and 95 would be a great ride. I finally let him get back to his half eaten hamburger and headed south.

    Rouch and his 74 R900
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    95 was pretty and it too had road construction in spots but overall was a great road. Eventually it played out into flat open landscape sweltering in the heat. At the junction of 95 and I-84 in Payette there was a great surplus and military vehicle sales lot and there were military trucks, Humvees, Huey choppers and even Abrams tanks for sale. Man toys for sure.

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    How in God's name can you dent an Abrams tank like this?
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    I was at the border of Oregon, so I headed west across the river to Ontario, Oregon just so I could say I'd been to Oregon then looped back over the river on 84 towards Boise. The highway had just recently been coated with tar so it was about 15 miles on slick fresh tar. Nasty.

    The ride was flat, hot and boring, with long stretches of 45 mph single lane road while the highway was being redone.

    When I FINALLY reached Boise and found Big Twin BMW for a breather and a T-shirt, I spotted two incredibly suspicious and gnarly looking guys hanging around a somewhat dirty 1200GS. My instincts were correct and sure enough they were ADV riders - "BoneBag" and "Nortwoods Tiger" from ADVRider.com. The 1200GS was Bonebag's, and Nortwoods was on a 2000 Tiger. I gotta say Nort is one big dude - 6'9" and riding a Tiger - awesome. I think they were both getting new rear tires put on and were heading for northern California. (Bonebag, if you guys are running from the law let me know and I'll say you were heading east) They'd ridden west on 84 from the direction I was headed and informed me it was flat, hot and boring. As I was leaving, another rider pulled up on a 98 GS and we talked a bit. He suggested I take Hwy 30 to Twin Falls off I-84 for a change of scenery.

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    Bonebag and Nortwoods
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    Yours truly courtesy of Bonebag
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    Bonebag and Nort were right on. "flat, hot and boring"... I motored on as fast as possible in the hot, high and gusty winds for what seemed hours until Bliss where I got onto Hwy 30 - the "Thousand Springs Byway".



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    It certainly was nicer than the interstate and followed the river through valleys and fossil beds. I had run out of water in the Camelbak earlier and finally got so dehydrated I had to stop. I sucked down a frozen drink and liter of water as it began to get dark, the orange glow of the skies beautiful and acrid from the forest fires.



    Age of the dinosaurs
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    A side road that took me to the river
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    I finally reached Twin Falls at dusk and found a decent hotel for the night.

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    Today's Route:

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    See ya!
    #3
  4. roberts

    roberts GS'er

    Joined:
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    Hi Joseph,

    It is great to follow along on your trip. I wish you the best on your ride back. Just get ready for the west Texas heat. :knary I am really missing the CO weather.

    Robert
    #4
  5. GB

    GB . Administrator Super Moderator Super Supporter

    Joined:
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    Thanks for letting us in on your return trip.. great pics and ride :thumb
    #5
  6. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Robert how was the Ouray trip? Anxious to see some of your pics and ride story :clap.

    It's been over 100 every day for the last two weeks and I'm dreading getting back into Texas - if it's hotter there I think I'll just shoot myself now and get it over with :D

    Thanks GB!
    #6
  7. Bonebag

    Bonebag ADDvrider

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    Man..it was nice meeting you. Tiger and I are pretty damn hung over today...we ended up staying the night in downtown Boise...shit...this is one hell of a party town:freaky :freaky ...we're off to the coast now after some greasy breakfast...

    new tires are fun.:D

    Catch up with you later
    #7
  8. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Hey Bone - you guys stay safe and it was cool meeting you guys :thumbup
    #8
  9. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Day 3: Twin Falls, ID to Moab, UT

    The Unladen Swallow... European... not African... no, wait...
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    This morning I had breakfast at the motel and while packing the bike had a conversation with a nice guy from Canada who was loading up his 85 Goldwing. He'd been making a loop from Canada through the western U. S. and was headed back north. He said he could barely talk from the smoke of forest fires he'd ridden through and I'd had a sore throat all day for the same reason. Wished each other well and headed off in opposite directions.


    Mmmmmmm... egg-like substance and coffee
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    I-84 from Twin Falls towards Salt Lake City was flat, hot and windy so I just pegged the throttle and leaned the bike into the wind gusts.

    Leaving Twin Falls
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    As I eventually got near the Utah border, a few mountains began to rise on the horizon and the telltale wisps of smoke from forest fires could be seen.


    There's a far over thar
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    Further south near the border there were mutiple fires so I pulled off the road and headed up a farm road to try and get closer. I could see a large chopper dropping water on the flames but the road through the fields began to get extremely deep in powder dust - about 8 to 10 inches and the pig became a real handful. I finally decided to give up and turned around just as a forest service truck came by and doused me in dust.


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    Back on the highway to Salt Lake and crossing the border into Utah the scenery got pretty nice considering it was interstate. The heat increased as well as the wind and I eventually hit Salt Lake around noon or 1 and the traffic was "intense". Fast, congested and full of jerks going 95mph. I was dehydrated and needed a break so I grabbed a burger at Fuddruckers and cooled off for about an hour.



    Forming my evil plan...
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    The goal was Moab and so Hwy 6 at Spanish Fork just south of Provo was the road. A huge plume of smoke was rising like a mushroom cloud from the mountains south of me as I headed into the canyon on Hwy 6.



    Fire south of Provo
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    Hwy 6 turned out to be a great ride - lots of canyons and scenery.
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    Just before Price there were some great rock formations. At Price I pulled off to find a cold drink and more water. I reaaaally went through the fluids today...



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    After Price, the road drops into beautiful and lonely desert mountains - really beautiful but dry and hot.



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    One note - I got PO'd on this stretch because there were a steady stream of cars and trucks all traveling really fast - 90 to 100 mph and you'd find yourself squeezed front and rear in a high speed caravan. It made pulling off and shooting pics a real pain due to the fear of getting creamed from the rear.


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    From Hwy 6 I took I-70 east to the Moab cutoff. That stretch of 70 has some interesting views to the north of the desert mountains. Coming into the Moab area was exciting. As the first red rocks began to be visible, the excitement came up. Dropping down into the canyon as you approach Moab is just breath-taking. Really beautiful!

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    It was approaching sundown when I got into Moab so I checked into a room hurriedly and left most of my gear there, zooming off to ride through the Arches park as the sun was setting.

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    I barely got into the park, stopping frequently to shoot pics - the sun was low and beautiful on the red rocks.



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    Rain through the canyon
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    I stopped at one point to shoot a pic when suddenly the cloud overhead burst into heavy rain - it was the only cloud over the park and the last thing I expected was rain in this intense heat. The rain became a serious downpour and I had left my rain gear at the hotel! As I scrambled to find something to cover with and realizing I was gonna be soaked to the bone in a minute, a small white pickup pulled right behind me and I saw someone waving for me to get in. I grabbed my helmet, tank bag and sheepskin seat cover and dove in the cab as the wind and rain burst on us.

    The cab was filled with smoke from an "unknown" substance and the Moody Blues were jamming on the CD player. Sopping wet I looked at the driver and said thanks, not sure what I was getting into. The woman behind the wheel laughed at my predicament and said "Boy, aren't you lucky I was here!" Turns out she lives in Moab and spends a lot of time exploring the park and photographing extensively there.

    This pretty well describes the atmosphere of the cab
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    The bike is over there somewhere under the rain
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    Since it was raining she drove me around a large area of the park and explained various areas, etc. She was a great tour guide and told me the best spots for images. It was getting dark and the rain cloud had moved on so she dropped me back at the bike and went on. It had gotten dark as I got my gear back on the bike. I stood there for a while in the silence and watched the moon rise over a peak.



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    As it got cool, I started the bike and rode back out of the park and into the town where I ate at McStiff's before crashing.

    It was a long hot ride today but Moab was worth it for sure!

    The Route:
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    #9
  10. Teeds

    Teeds Don Quixote

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    :clap Great ride report :clap

    Beautiful photography of Arches
    #10
  11. roberts

    roberts GS'er

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    We had a great trip! Here is the link to the photos:
    https://rstallones.smugmug.com/gallery/3173567#174580716

    The heat isn't too bad yet, but it won't stop raining, everyday.
    It's so wet the frogs are hitching out of town.


    #11
  12. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Thanks Teeds!

    Robert - great pics man - I'm jealous I couldn't make it down in time. I'm in Ridgway right now in the rain and heading to Ouray tomorrow. What pass(es) did you guys take? I'm going to drop my excess gear and do some pass roads if the weather clears...
    #12
  13. roberts

    roberts GS'er

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    Hi!
    Cinnamon Pass is GSable, and Engineer is a bit more difficult.
    We rode dirt roads north of Silverton, CR110 and CR2. They both ended up in some nice areas. CR2 out of Silverton will take you to Cinnamon Pass.
    The pictures with the truck on the wet, dirt roads are on CR110.
    The Silverton Chamber of Commerce (800-752-4494) has a good map of the roads and passes in the area.

    We tried to get to Telluride, but road construction was causing a 30 minute delay so we u-turned and headed back.

    If you need a shower, A&B RV park in Silverton has them available for $5.00
    and a great place to eat is the Brown Bear Cafe. We ate there three or four times.

    Be careful on the road (hwy. 550) from Ouray to Silverton if the roads are wet. Sharp curves, minivans, no guardrails.

    Have fun!
    Robert


    #13
  14. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Day 4: Moab, UT to Ridgway, CO

    This morning I got a late start - checked the bike over for tire pressure, oil level, yada yada and headed back into Arches Nat'l Park. Even in the rising heat and ugly light it is stunning. I made it all the way through on each of the paved roads until I spotted a gravel road heading off into the wash area.

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    The road was mainly gravel and washboard but it felt good to be on dirt and heading away from touristas. Eventually I reached the bottom of the wash where the gravel and sand ended and the road became sand. It looked pretty soft but I decided to go ahead. Famous last words :)



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    About 50 yards in the sand got so deep I was getting seasick from the wallowing pig and decided to turn around. With the oil tanker turning radius of the pig, I attempted to turn in the road since the sides looked even deeper. As I got sideways and realizing I wouldn't make the turn I nailed the throttle to try and powerslide the rear end around to avoid having to stop... of course I wasn't factoring in all the weight of my gear and the pig got traction...

    I shot over into the soft deep sand just off the road edge and tried to finesse the beast out of the deep stuff. Right. It was like riding in slow motion on the back of a whale as I kept the throttle on and finally the bike buried about 8" deep, nose pointing into the really deep stuff. I killed the throttle before I headed down into the sand like a Worm from "Dune".

    I jumped off the bike and started pulling all the gear off, tossing it behind me and the bike. After losing about 80 lbs of cases, I got back on to see if I could miraculously float the bike across the sand. Not. It buried the front end deeper. Looking back I had half burried the cases in dirt from the rear tire. :)


    oops
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    It was hot, and I was alone in the small wash so I did it the old fashioned way - I lifted the rear of the bike and swung it back onto the 4" deep sand on the road and after about 10 minutes of yanking back on the bars, sweating and moving the bike rearward an inch at a time I finally got the monster back on the road. Hot, sweating like a pig and thirsty, I sucked the Camelbak dry and then loaded the gear back on the beast. It started and I wallowed forward, tacking from side to side like a sailboat until I finally hit some gravel and got some traction. It was fun :)


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    From Arches I went back north to Canyonlands. The road in was a great ride in itself and the higher altitude was a couple of degrees cooler. In the park there are a lot of small S curves and it was fun trying to wear the square edges off my tires.


    The road to the park
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    The sights and canyons in the park are just stunning. In fact they're not just stunning they're Moabulous :D

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    I really enjoyed Canyonlands as well as Arches. Moab is just a great place to ride and I'll definitely come back
    and spend time here again. I'd like to do some of the backroads and explore the area - maybe on an XR or similar bike. What a cool place! As MacArthur said, "I shall return." or as Arnold said, "I'll be bok".

    Headed south on 191 from Moab and caught 46 east towards Colorado and the Telluride area. 46 is actually a great road - scenic and very little traffic - in fact on my ride I saw maybe 6 cars on the entire run. As I neared La Sal, I could see rain and darkness ahead so I stopped and swapped the armor out of my Triumph mesh jacket into the Belstaff.

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    It was still warm but I soon hit small showers and the temps dropped. The road got better and better as it neared Colorado and turned into Colorado 90. There were some long stretches but the road was great and got into long twisties and canyons. Really a great ride!


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    Bedrock - the old store is for sale
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    San Miguel Valley
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    On the horizon I could see black storm clouds over the Telluride area and knew I was heading into rain. Stopped at the intersection of 90 and 141 to check my map and in a couple of minutes a rider pulled in next to me. He was returning to Denver from a trip out to Phoenix and surrounding areas and had come up 191 from Arizona just a few minutes behind me. He said 191 from AZ was a really great road with excellent mountains. While we talked another rider on a Harley stopped and asked the way to Moab. We directed him back on 46 and then each headed our separate ways.



    Jumped into my rain gear outside - used the odor to make me hurry :O
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    The temp continued to drop and I finally stopped and got my gloves and rain pants. Temp gauge showed about 50 degrees and the skies got darker. At Placerville the road towards Ridgway looked a little less threatening for black clouds so I decided to go for Ouray rather than Telluride. The rain came and stayed as sprinkles and bursts (sounds like a name for candy).



    Rain over Ouray
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    Cool little partial rainbow on the way
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    Great road but I got hung up behind some slow trucks and began losing the light. I pulled off for a pic and was passed by a couple on a Harley - wet and freezing - and as I pulled out behind them he suddenly locked the brakes and swerved - barely missing two deer who had bolted across the road in the low light. He drove much slower after the close call and I passed him, trying to make Ridgway before dark. The road was wet and it was just at dark when I came down the pass into town, relieved to see gas stations and potentially a motel or two. I said a short prayer to find a room this late and found the Lodge there. The girl behind the counter told me they just had a room cancellation and I could have it. Woohoo! I love it when God smiles on me :)

    I dropped the gear and headed back into the little town to eat. There is a great Thai restaurant there called Siam and the food is superb. Great little place to eat if you come through.

    What a day - 100 degree temps in Moab and 50 degrees with rain three hours later. Awesome roads today and looking forward to Ouray and vicinity tomorrow - hope the weather clears!

    The Route:
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    #14
  15. Ops_south

    Ops_south Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
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    Bitterroot Valley, Montana
    I like the /\/\otorola sign! That thing is vintage.

    -Erik
    #15
  16. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    That sign was cool! Looks like a neat place to have a store... as long as you're independently wealthy :) Sign said it had been there since 1885 I think.
    #16
  17. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Day 5: A Day in Ouray

    I didn't get much sleep so I woke up groggy and headed the 10 miles for Ouray and coffee. Never really woke up so I decided to just hang out in the town and have a rest day - plus I didn't relish the idea of dropping the bike on a pass road when I'm not clear headed :)

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    Leaving Ridgway for the treacherous 10 mile ride to Ouray
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    Ouray was nice and cool, and I hung out art the coffee shop and watched all the bikes come and go through town. Lots of variety with a lot of GS's, KTM's, dirt bikes and the mix of Harleys.

    This is just wrong...
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    Aaaaaah, Ouray
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    I went in search of a campsite for the night and found one (supposedly) at the Amphitheatre Campground. The folks were still occupying so I rode back to town to get more coffee and hang out a bit more. About 3 pm I went back to the campsite to find it still occupied so I made another run to town for laundry duty. My life just can't possibly get more exciting...


    The laundromat
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    The washing machines - guess which one I was using
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    Anyway after a lengthy discussion with a lady from Louisiana in the laundromat (dang I should have used more Downy on my undies!) I headed back up to the campground again and found the host who explained the campers had been mountain climbing and got back late and tired. He said I could pitch my tent on his friends pad at 1/2 the camping price so that was cool with me. I asked if I needed to do a bear bag and he said "No, the only bears are in town." I thought he was joking and said I'd seen two in the bar as well as a hefer... but found out he was serious. He said they'd been spotted around the hot springs pool area just yesterday. Makes me wonder if they see the hot steaming pool filled with people as Caldo de Res? Caldo de Pollo???

    No comment
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    It had been sunny most of the day and was actually pretty hot so I decided to go for a swim at the hot springs. As I finished pitching the tent and headed down to town again, the rain came in and by the time I got to the springs they had closed the pool. Grrrrrr. Bummed, I rode back to town in the rain and ate at the Mexican Restaurant there - can't remember the name but it's the one with all the dollar bills stuck on the ceiling.

    I had several conversations with riders today - one on an 08 KLR who was riding from Seattle to the Southwest. We talked a long time and he'd been behind me a few miles through Idaho and Utah and even Moab. He liked the bike but said in Utah with the strong headwinds the bike was really pushing to maintain 75 mph and burned a lot of oil on that run. He said that was the only oil the bike had used. My GS burned oil on the leg as well - it was the first I've had to add - about half a pint or more. One thing I must say is the GS handled the winds fine as far as power - it just motored along as usual - the diff between a dual 1100 with a lot of torque and a 650 thumper. We discussed the passes and roads around here before he headed out.

    That's him
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    A few minutes later I saw a red and white airhead GS PD with a couple taking pictures of each other. I volunteered to shoot them together and we talked a bit. They were from Dallas and had flown to Idaho to buy the 93 PD and were riding back to Texas. Great bike and I wish I had one :)

    That's them
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    Earlier this morning there was a herd (gaggle? pack? school?) of DS's at the coffee shop - KTM's and others and the guys were loading up on a run into the mountains. Boy I wished I had an XR 650 so I could have tagged along - waaaaah

    [​IMG]



    The main response I seem to get about the bike is the shock that I'm riding alone. Even bikers seem to be surprised. Hmmmm. A buddy would be nice for the tricky roads but it ain't no big deal. The latest was a drunk Harley rider and friends who seemed to be amazed at the thought of riding a GS alone and on back roads. They invited me to the bar for more discussion :)

    [​IMG]




    Hopefully this is the driver's bike...
    [​IMG]


    This cool/cold weather is sooooooooooo nice... In fact I'm sitting on a bench at dusk enjoying the fall-like weather and posting this - picking up wifi from the coffee shop across the street. I'm also getting ogled in my shorts, hiking shoes and Belstaff jacket typing on my Mac by the tourists walking by. He he he! Ok, it's getting cold now so I'm leaving...
    #17
  18. Teeds

    Teeds Don Quixote

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,572
    Location:
    427 miles ENE of Orla Texas
    Great report :clap keep it coming.

    That part of Colorado is wonderful!

    I keep saying I want a GSPD ...

    Maybe I need to fly somewhere and ride it back ...
    #18
  19. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,112
    Location:
    Texas, Zip Code EIEIO
    Hey Teeds - you and me too man - I wanna GSPD, and an XR and a 1150GSA and... and...

    Oh yeah - I forgot to say thanks for the compliment on the ride report - I always enjoy your photos and commentary here and on TWTEX...
    #19
  20. Teeds

    Teeds Don Quixote

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,572
    Location:
    427 miles ENE of Orla Texas
    Thanks! I need to get off my butt and pull together a report on the Queen to Cloudcroft and back ride ...
    #20