The 650 Dakar Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by underwaterguru, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    I have a 3-bolt Cee Bailey and it mounts to the same points as the stock screen with the U-shaped bracket underneath, so air can flow under it. I replaced it with a stock Dakar screen because I kept hitting my helmet/chin bar on it while on a really rough road. I figured if I planted the front in a bad rut I could actually break my windpipe on the edge since it stuck up so far.

    The stock screen honestly doesn't seem that much difference in terms of protection or wind noise. Either of them are noisier than when I stand up and get totally clean air over my helmet. If the bike didn't look fugly without a screen I'd just leave it off entirely.
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  2. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    No experience with the 3 point windshields from the single sparks. The Madstad is by no means as smooth as no screen, but in extremely cold weather I can find a sweet spot behind it with a bit of a tuck that makes all the difference. Regular upright riding is okay, but if I stand on the pegs going 80-90MPH, my Schuberth E1 becomes almost completely silent despite the peak that catches any hint of dirty air from the stock or Madstad shields...
  3. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    I don't have ABS, so maybe it's totally different, but FWIW, I've run without any original instruments since 2003 and the rear wheel speed sensor attached to the wheel as well as the "other end" (a plug near the ECU AFAIR).
    Then I removed the rear ABS ring maybe 2010 and finally removed the speed sensor cable al together a couple of years ago.
    Bike's behaved the same regardless.
    11/2000 built single spark. 100K kms on it now.
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  4. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    Congrats!
    Tires are good to go, unless they've been stored in direct sunlight and you can see that hey are damaged of course.
    "They say" tires should be replaced after 6-7 yrs regardless of wear. I have a set of tires (Anakee III) on my street wheels that are from 2012 or 2013 maybe....think I had them mounted in 2013. They are hardly worn and I've used them even if they should've replaced due to age and I've not noticed any less grip from them.
    Then again maybe it's not a fading grip, but a sudden failure type of deal with old tires. Wouldn't think so.
  5. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    Yup. Common fault when the brake light don't function properly. Had to adjust both switches over the years.
  6. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    Jeez.....go ride the TET for a couple of days and this is what you come back to :lol3

    upload_2021-7-22_9-42-32.png
  7. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    WTactualF :scratch
    Weird.
    Yes, my original TT screw and spacer was gone one day. Can't recall if it had broken and there was just a stud left in the frame, but since then it has never broken. I just replaced with a generic 6mm bolt I found and made a spacer from some nuts.
    This was ages ago, 8-9 yrs at least. I've also jacked the bike up MANY times and never had an issue with the front mount.
  8. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    .....and whatever stock remained found it's way to a shelf in @TobyG 's shop :lol3
    He probably has one or two available.... you might have to buy a €10K (?) rallye kit to get one though :D
  9. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    Been thinking about it myself, but in the end I decided against it. Not sure I'll be able to remove the drain plug and drain the oil without making a mess on the top of the skid plate anyhow and also guessing a hole like that will weaken the structural integrity of the plate itself. I've found the alu is not perhaps not as strong as it should be. Maybe down to engineering concerns, but I've had to knock the "lip" at the rear back into one single straight angle a couple of times since it gets dented when hitting football sized rocks (the football sport played with your feet).
    Getting hung up is less of a concern to me. Thinking if the edges of the hole are rounded off it ought to slide over stuff easily enough.
    Aaaaaaand - we're talking about 3 screws to remove it..... not that big a deal in the grand schemes of things :-)
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  10. Quench

    Quench Adventurer Supporter

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    I fixed the faulty brake switch last night. It wasn't actually the little spring/metal lever, but a tiny sprung pin in the body of the switch. It was stuck in the up position. So no amount of fiddling or bending that little lever made any difference until I sprayed a bit of brake cleaner on that tiny pin and eventually got it to move freely again. I have a new switch on order just in case this becomes a recurring problem.

    The new tail light showed up yesterday along with oil change supplies. I started to go after removing the tail light, but it looked a bit more complicated than I had originally thought. I found a video that showed taking off the rack and side covers to get to the bolts holding the whole light/license plate assembly. They were working on G, though, but it looked very similar. I assume that I'll have the same process?

    Since I don't have much info on the service history, should I do the coolant and brake fluid as well?

    And finally, I got it insured, titled and tagged, which is awesome.
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  11. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    I replaced the LED tail light with the one from Wunderlich last year and it was a real PITA. Took me like two afternoons to correctly install everything back.

    Definitely do the coolant and then it is one less thing to worry about. Brakes fluids as well if you can. I haven't done my brake fluid change but it is in my to do list. I believe ABS brakes are easier with GS911 tool but that is expensive. I wonder if a cheaper alternative to GS 911 exists.
  12. Quench

    Quench Adventurer Supporter

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    Uh - oh. Yeah, I bought one from Wunderlich too.

    The service manual describes a very typical brake fluid swap - no mention of special tools that I recall, so I was hoping this would be easy. But I was concerned about the ABS - I know they often create a whole new process for bleeding.

    /off to google GS911 tool/
  13. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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    :roflI just asked him "rare as hen's teeth" is his response, the few people I have seen here that had one waited a long time for theirs so I suspect small quantities were made.
    One came up on eBay a few years ago but the guy wanted nearly £500 for it and I was flat broke at the time
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  14. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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    Which part of the TET?
  15. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    Yeah I am also thinking I'll just end up dumping oil everywhere so it might not be worth putting in a hole for that purpose. It's actually 5 screws to remove this plate, and the ones at the back go through the footpegs and the lower crash bar mounts with nylocks on top of couple of em and it's a bit of a wrestling match every time I need to remove/install it since nothing lines up perfectly. Maybe I'll open the rearmost slots on each side so I don't have to remove those fasteners entirely.

    If the plate bends when you hit a huge rock that's probably a good thing, it means it's absorbing that force instead of transferring it to your frame or engine case. But also my riding buddy was like "why does that have a lip on it? it's just gonna catch on things" - my guess is that besides any other possible reason, it gives some rigidity to the back part of the plate so that it doesn't bend along the front-to-back axis as easily. Then again they could have bent it upwards instead of down and achieved the same thing.
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  16. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    Yeah, my experience with accessing the mount points for the rear brake light is that it involves a good bit of fussing around inside the tail compartment and underneath. I remember starting in on the job in the dark out in my yard thinking "OK this'll just be three screws no problem" and it took a lot longer than I had expected.

    Do the brake fluids for sure, unless you know they've been done recently. If the lines are original you might consider replacing them too. I had the original lines on my 2001 model and blew out the rear one way up in the mountains. It was interesting coming home with only the front and my compression braking, and my mind thinking about how the front brake line is just as old as the back one. The rubber inside those can disintegrate over time and clog up your master cylinder or caliper too.

    Replacing the rear line can be a pain in the ass, the banjo fitting is hard to get a wrench on without removing the swingarm. At least in my experience. So I did the swingarm and linkage bearings while I was at it. :lol3
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  17. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    How about a petcock-style drain plug combined with a skid plate that protects it? Remove the drain hole plug, attach drain hose, turn petcock, Walla!
    velo-hobo likes this.
  18. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    I have actually thought about this quite a bit. It sounds super appealing, though I've not pursued it since I have to assume there's some folly to it that I'm not seeing. That said there are products out there and if the valve is pressure and heat-rated, can be secured and protected, then it seems it would work out fine?
  19. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    Almost 20 years ago when I sourced a drain plug for my pickup, I found a source for generic drain plugs with hose attachments like that. Guessing they wouldn't be too difficult to find nowadays...?
  20. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    Yeah I did a quick web search to see if it the idea was crazy or not - plenty of products out there. Though I guess you lose the benefit of having a magnetic plug to tell you whether something in the case is grinding itself to pieces.