The 650 Dakar Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by underwaterguru, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    And it does the same with the mounting bolts secured? Are they loose because you used longer bolts for the spacers and they don't mount up right?

    I've been careless with the adjustment bolts for the Madstad and the bracket rattled around a bit when that happened, but the shield itself has been rock solid under all conditions.
  2. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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    The GS911 capabilities are defined by the diagnostics routines inbuilt in the ECUs, the Sensor/Output tests are the ones which save considerable time in fault finding plus adaption resets & it has one test which BMW left out of the Dealer System, the Real Time Logging of the WiFi model with internal storage of data is the gem & why BMW Techs buy it along with quicker than Dealer System simple basic service resets, fault code check & clear on later models

    Re ABS brake bleeding F series done using diagnostics, G Series with later ABS ECU done as normal non ABS without diagnostics
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  3. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    Yeah the bolts are tight and secure. My guess is that the actual mounting points/bracket inside the headlight assembly have some flex and is not super rigid. Hence the movement. I can share a video tomorrow to show it.
  4. Renaissanceman

    Renaissanceman DON'T PANIC! Supporter

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    I've been doing this for thousands and thousands of miles. ABS works as well today as it did 14 years ago.
    I'm jealous... I'm looking for an 06 to replace my beloved 03, and they're getting harder to find.
    Good luck!


    Rotax owners fan club member
    '03 Dakar - 144,000 miles
  5. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    The mounting points on the subframe are kinda garbage. Some weldnuts on little cantilevered tabs. I actually popped one off by accident, tried to glue it back on with epoxy since it's held in place when tightened, but it fell off next time I removed the windshield. So I just drilled and tapped the tab for the next size up, M6. Seems OK.
  6. Renaissanceman

    Renaissanceman DON'T PANIC! Supporter

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    It's not that hard,,, you can get at it from the rear storage compartment. There's also a couple cap screws underneath - behind the license plate, but no need to remove any body parts... as I recall.

    FWIW,,, mine has been bouncing along back there in stock form for all these years and miles. There was the time on those epic washboards where the lens cover disappeared, but the lamp itself stayed connected.
    I'm still surprised to see mine after every ride - I suppose it'll fall off this weekend now that I'm mentioning it.

    Good luck!
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  7. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    I've stripped one of those nuts. Using a loose nut on the backside now, but that has to change. It's keeping me from working on the bike*.

    It's not made to bleed brakes, but it'll assist with that as well. I wish I had one on Tuesday when my fan suddenly stopped working.

    My little red tell-tale LED on the dash that informs me that the fan is on stayed dark for much longer than normal. I stopped to see at what temp it'd kick in, but when the coolant reached 111C and the fan was still not triggered I had to shut it off to prevent damage. So stood on a gravel road in the middle of the woods I was wondering what was wrong. Since I have the LED I knew the fan wasn't getting triggered at least. With a GS911 I could've overridden the ECU and forced the fan to start, or tried at least.
    We kept on riding a little slower (the road was also wider, so the level of attack fell a little and the air-cooling was working so the temp never rose high again. Then suddenly it started working again.

    * And had I installed my new GPS properly over the weekend I probably wouldn't have pulled on the wires and accidentally made a bad connection to the fan. My LO beam dash LED also flickered once, which is why I suspect just a poor connection.
  8. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Old, growing older.

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    The very southern part of the TET Norway south.

    [​IMG]

    Left my house Monday morning and arrived back on Wednesday evening.
    Did 770km, but that was a lot of getting to and fro
    Mon: 250km (ca 100km TET)
    Tue: 180km (all TET)
    Wed. 340km (ca 100km TET)

    so reckon we TET'd 380km on this trip

    [​IMG]

    Started at the Swedish border to avoid all the hassle of crossing at a manned crossing and the time delay that involves at this time. Even if we're both fully vaccinated we'd have to stand in line with the rest of the people crossing the border.
    This crossing is monitored by cameras.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Figuring out how the new XP XT works.

    [​IMG]

    At the infamous Rotneblikk lean-to (Gapahuk in Norwegian)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We camped shortly after. Out plan was to stay at the lean-to, but pitching tents there were near impossible.

    I think there were about 5 tollroads that require payment from motorcycles. In the past most didn't, but seems they've added MC to the list now. Tolls varied from €1 to €7. We encountered one automatic toll station that takes pictures of both ends of the vehicle, but except for one, all the others you can pay with the app VIPPS. The one that required coin payment (NOK15/ €1.50) we had to bypass. Who TF uses cash anymore?
    The "problem" for us is that we really don't want to ride on the toll roads since that means they are somewhat maintained :lol3

    If there's no cellphone coverage you take a picture of the VIPPS info and pay later when you have reception. This one was €1.

    [​IMG]

    On Tuesday we made it from the wooden lowland of Finnskogen to the mountains north-west of Elverum and camped by the lake Øyungen. This was our turn around spot.

    [​IMG]

    My planning was immaculate as usual ..... I look outside, it's blue skies and 27C and I forgot to pack pretty much all my clothes.
    Even if we were at just 700 meters it got cold at night (6C)

    [​IMG]

    Wednesday we followed the major gravel road back down to the Elverum area and I cannot recommend doing this part as it a major road. No problem doing most corners at 80-90kph while staying seated. Surface is hard packed gravel that might as well be asphalt. With some loose gravel on top. I think it was about 70km back down from the mountain and Eirik was leading....meaning I ate dust

    [​IMG]
  9. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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    Not heard of the Garmin XP but apparently, the XT has a pretty good adventure feature
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  10. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    So I've dismantled most of the front end and surprise- it is a mess. I won't mention the incident with trying to support the body while on a Kendon tube lift using a scissors jack and some boards, but three of the four bolts holding the front fender on had sheared off/rusted through. Luckily I had a spare triple tree from a previous parts buy, so can just swap that in without worrying about drilling and rethreading those holes, or punching off the old bearings. Weird thing is, when I was trying to get those bearings off, one of the holes to place the punch through was half obstructed by what looks like a weld. I did these bearings once before, but I guess that time I also swapped over the triple, so this one had never had the OEM bearing driven off of it. Or could something cause the weld material there to 'flow' over the hole?

    That doesn't seem likely, but my question is about the steering head. The chain gang faq says to use high temp bearing grease there, what temps is it likely to see? Even though the link is labeled GS Steering, I suspect they are copying without editing something from the carbed 650 that had the oil in the frame around there. Also, is rust and pitting inside the steering head any concern?
  11. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    I think the hi-temp bearing grease is just referring to the same stuff you'd put in a wheel bearing? I'm sure that stuff would be fine, or EP2 grease as used in the suspension linkages.
  12. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    Wheel bearing grease? How many RPM should I expect my steering column to see?

    I'm recalling this conversation from a few years back, but not the conclusions. The main concern is water resistance. Looks like an EP2 is what the manual recommends. How does that compare with ol "Phil's Waterproof" for washout resistance?
  13. velo-hobo

    velo-hobo *_*

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    Hi-temp wheel bearing grease is rated for use adjacent to disc brakes which make a lot of heat near/at the hub. I think that stuff or Phils would be fine for the head bearings, I use it in all open bearings on my bicycles and unless I've been running axle-deep through muddy puddles in a storm up on a mountain fire road (it happens, to me at least...) it stays where you put it, even riding in the rain. If I was riding a lot in the rain (which doesn't happen in Cali anymore really) then I'd be renewing my bearing grease more frequently anyhow as a preventative measure.

    But if you already have some EP2 that would be a good choice as well I'd bet. The suspension linkages experience more pressure than they do lots RPMs, similar to the head bearings. It's not rocket science anyhow.
  14. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    I've switched back and forth a few times between the red Mobil 1 Synthetic grease and the moly-reinforced Sta-Lube EP grease. Last time around I went back to the Sta-Lube Moly grease, but the Mobil 1 does seem to resist washout a bit better. For steering bearings I don't generally worry about washout. Both have pretty similar performance specs.

    As for rusting inside the steering head, it indicates water getting around the adjuster cap or up around the bottom. I'd shove a wire wheel through there to get the rust out then paint the inside with some Rustoleum (not on the bearing race areas of course).
    You might also want to look into going with the Koyo bearings that have built in rubber seals. Might have to order them from the U.K.
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  15. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    The SKFs I had previously ordered, and thankfully had sitting around or I'd still be waiting for them along with the thermostat, look to have rubber seals on the caps. Their 320/28 'X' ones.
  16. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    Speaking of sealed caps, I think a found what might make a good addition to the FAQ instructions on installing steering head bearings. So before spending 15 minutes pounding on a piece of PVC with a rubber mallet at high velocity, would it be a good idea to have the cap (spacer) on the other side of the bearing? Can you pull a bearing that has no cap without destroying it? Asking for a friend...
  17. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    Not sure what you mean by "cap".
    Last bearings I installed, I inverted the lower triple and slid the bearing up as far as it would go. Then I took the inner race from the previous bearing (removed the cage and rollers), slid it on over the new bearing but upside-down, and set the whole thing upside-down on the jaws of my vice. Then I pounded on the bottom of the lower triple over the steering stem.
    If you can't visualize what I mean I'll mock it up and take a pic for you.
  18. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    I guess it is called a 'spacer'. A thin metal thing that goes on the fat end of the tapered bearings. The old ones were just thin metal, get destroyed when using punches in the holes to pop the bearings out. The ones that came with the SKF bearings are beefier and have some rubber on them to form a better seal. Except I don't think they will do much good on the thin side of the bearing...

    Am I missing something at crossroadz on bearing installation? All I can find is alternative parts info on the bearings, not seeing anything in repairs around steering. I think I feel a PDF coming on...
  19. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    I call the little sheet metal piece a grease shield. I've been able to press off both upper and lower bearings using some pins and haven't damaged the thin shields.

    Standard practice: Heat the bearing to about 100C and freeze the steering stem for a couple of hours before installing. Freeze the bearing races before pulling them into the steering head.
  20. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    IMG_20210427_152349797.jpg
    IMG_20210427_152344350.jpg
    I keep the old races around to use as spacers for pulling in the new ones.
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