The 800GS tire thread (oh, no you di-'nt!)

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by PackMule, Sep 27, 2008.

  1. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

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    Since we're reporting personal test results here in this thread, I thought I'd chime in.

    Battlewings do not have enough grip to keep me upright in -6F, rutted, packed snow conditions. :nod Perhaps if you had more mad skills than I ... but I'd have to see you do it. :lol3 Plan on studded knobbies if you want to do this type of riding. :deal You've been warned.

    FAIL

    :rofl

    David
    #41
  2. Peter800GS

    Peter800GS Adventurer

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    Has anyone put Anakees on their 800GS.
    I've put a TKC 80 on the rear amd an MT21 on the front of my 8GS.
    There's about 2-3 mm left on the TKC after 1500 kms ( 1,000 miles ) riding 70/30 road to dirt. I hope the last 1-2 mm lasts a while.
    The MT21 on the front is noisey on the road, grips well in both wet and dry though the bike does shake its head at speeds over 120 kph ( 65 Mph ).
    In the dirt I have no complaints.
    Your feedback on either Anakees or Tourances would be apprieciated.
    #42
  3. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    Has anyone tried out the Karoo Travellers on the 800 yet?
    #43
  4. M N B

    M N B would rather be riding

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    I know the Anakees are shipping as stock on some F800GS bikes.

    Mine came with BattleWings (bought one week before Thanksgiving), but I know someone that bought theirs one week ago and it has Anakees on it.

    The profile isn't as rounded as the Battlewings, but the groove width is larger (and deeper I thinkg), so I think it might be better suited for dirt. I may give those a shot after the BattleWings wear out.

    I'd like to go with knobbies, but with so little dirt to ride locally, it seems an expensive luxury to burn off knobbies quickly because of riding them on the pavement so much.
    #44
  5. ROYAL COACHMAN

    ROYAL COACHMAN Long timer Supporter

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    My TKC'S have been very stable at uber legal speeds and great off road.[​IMG]
    #45
  6. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    :lurk
    #46
  7. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    I've just been recommended Continental TKC80 on the front and Metzler Tourance on the rear. Anyone have any experience of this combination?
    #47
  8. DolphinJohn

    DolphinJohn Caveman

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    I ran that combo briefly on my '06 F650 (Tourance comes stock)

    Worked ok, but I would go with the TKC's front and rear.

    Yeah they wear fast, but grip way better when you need it.
    #48
  9. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    Thanks DJ. I should have said that the recommendation is for a 5500 mile trip through Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Chile of which 90% is on road. I guess they're thinking the Tourance will wear better on the rear and a full set of TKC80s won't be necessary as there's only a few hundred miles of gravel and track. I seem to remember "RTW" mentioning something about a knobbly front and a road-oriented rear in his thread; I'll go see what I can find.
    #49
  10. tmex

    tmex Long timer

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    My experience with the stock Battlewings was excellent on the street, and the Wings worked OK on hardpacked and even heavily rutted dirt roads. The Wings do not like mud. I've had them in some very shallow sand, and they were also OK there.

    For some reason I just do not have confidnece in the TKC80's. They have never failed me, and have carried me up and down some pretty scary (for me) stuff. I think it is in my head. When I look at a TKC80 it just does not seem that it is a real dirt tire. Maybe I spent too much time on S12's in the dirt. I've had the TKC80's in some fairly deep sand, and they work well there. I have not had them in any serious mud yet. I cannot seem to get past 2500 miles on a rear TKC80. Of course I live by the BillyD axiom that "life is too short to ride on worn tires".
    #50
  11. todd5774

    todd5774 Hillbilly

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    If your after a 140/80/17 rear i use Mitas C02 Stoneking on my XTZ850 with a MT21 on the front and a mate does the same on his gs800 with no complaints, found the tkc to be pretty useless, front washes in the mud and rear slides and clogs real easy. Also found the Mitas lasts for ages.

    The Mitas

    [​IMG]
    #51
  12. tmex

    tmex Long timer

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    Thank you Todd! That is exactly what I was looking for.
    #52
  13. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    I haven't been able to find the C02 from a US distributor. Has anyone else? :ear
    #53
  14. zaner32

    zaner32 In over my head

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    #54
  15. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Thanks, Zaner. Same boat here.
    #55
  16. Magile

    Magile Long timer Supporter

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    Contact Drew Smith at W.E.R. < http://www.werproducts.net/ > He may be able to help. I bought Trelleborg tires from him. Trelle's & Mitas come from the same factory.

    From http://www.trelleborg.com/sv/wheelsystems/Contact-Us/Questions-and-answeres/ , "The Trelleborg off-road motorcycle tires are sold and manufactured by Mitas A/S, Czech Republic. Mitas A/S has full access to all tire moulds, constructions and compounds. The tires will also in the future be manufactured with the Trelleborg name." :deal

    - M.
    #56
  17. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    Wheel Specs:
    Rim, front 2.15 x 21" Rim, rear 4.25 x 17"
    Tyres, front 90/90 - 21 54V Tyres, rear 150/70 - 17 69V

    BMW Recommended Tyres:

    Road Bias:

    Front: Michelin Anakee, 90/90-21 M/C TL/TT (54V)
    Rear: Michelin Anakee C, 150/70 R17 M/C TL/TT (69V)

    [​IMG]

    Front: Bridgetstone Battlewing 501 G, 90/90-21 M/C TL/TT (54V) COMES AS STOCK
    Rear: Bridgestone Battlewing 502 G, 150/70 R17 M/C TL/TT (69V) COMES AS STOCK

    [​IMG]

    Off-Road Bias:

    Front: Metzler Karoo (T) Front, 90/90-21 M/C TL (54Q)* M+S
    Rear: Metzler KAroo (T), 150/70 -17 M/C TL (69Q)* M+S

    [​IMG]

    Front: Continental Twinduro TKC80, 90/90-21 M/C TL (54Q)* (Not manufacturered yet, go for
    the 90/90 54T model at present)
    Rear: Continental Twinduro TKC80, 150/70 B17 M/C TL (69Q)*

    [​IMG]

    * These tyres are rated Q (160km/h or 99mp/h) instead of V but can be used if "the
    permissable top speed is indicated by readily visible means (e.g. sticker affixed in the rider's
    field of vision)".

    Tyres not mentioned by BMW:

    The load index & size matches with slightly reduced speed rating are:
    Front: Pireli Scorpion MT90 A/T 90/90 -21 TL 54V M/C
    Rear: Pirelli Scorpion MT 90 S/T 150/70 R17 TL 69H

    [​IMG]

    Front: Avon Distanzia AM43 90/90 -21 TL 54T
    Rear: Avon Distanzia AM 44 150/70 R17 TL 69V

    [​IMG]

    Front; Metzeler Tourance 90/90 -21 TL 54H M/C
    Rear: Metzeler Tourance 150/70 R17 TL 69V

    [​IMG]

    Q&A

    What pressures should I run my tyres at?
    For stock tyres:
    FRONT one-up: 2.2bar/32psi at 20 degrees celcius
    FRONT two-up and/or with luggage: 2.5bar/36psi at 20 degrees celcius
    REAR one-up: 2.5bar/36psi at 20 degrees celcius
    REAR two-up and/or with luggage: 2.9bar/42psi at 20 degrees celcius
    A quick internet search will throw up correct pressures for alternative tyres. 2.2front/2.5rear
    seems to be common. On the road I quite liked 2.5front/2.9rear only one-up on the stock Battlewings.

    Can I use Tubeless Tyres on the 800GS?
    Yes, Tubeless tyres (TL) are fine. So are tube-type (TT) tyres. See Chart above. But either way you will still need a tube (see rim sizes above).
    That's because the wheels have spokes and air will leak out if you don't have a tube. The 1200GS has special spoke that go to the side of the wheel so their owners can use tubeless tyres - you can't on your 800GS.

    Do I need Rim Locks?
    Probably not, unless you're planning to do the Paris-Dakar on the 800GS in which case you should know a lot more about tyres and tubes already.

    How do I check pressures at 20 degrees celcius?
    Set the climate control in your garage to 20 degrees celcius and only ever check your pressure in there. OR...bear in mind that a change of 10 degrees celcius is equivalent to a change of about 0.07bars or 1psi. So on a near freezing day increase pressure by about 0.14bars/2psi or on a very hot Death Valley kind of day reduce pressure by 0.14bars/2psi. This applies to 'cold' tyres that haven't been ridden on recently, I have no idea how hot your tyres will be after a few trails.

    Should I reduce pressures when off-roading?
    If you're going on sand, gravel or very gloopy mud you can maybe lose 5psi/0.4bars but much less and you risk 'tyre slip' where the wheel spins but the tyre doesn't. This will result in the tube valve being ripped out and sudden deflation. You could deflate more and use rim locks (see above). Put it this way: the BMW Off-Road schools runs their 800GSs off road at road pressures. 'nuff said.

    If I want to repair a puncture out in the woods, what tools will I need?
    - 22mm socket for front axel
    - 24mm socket for rear axel
    - a wrench for the sockets
    - Torx keys for M8 and M10 torx bolts (front axel clamps and front brake calliper)
    - Tork key for the ABS sensor if you are clumsy and might knock it when removing/replacing wheel
    - A centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    - A large rock/block to go under the engine when you want to remove the front wheel on the centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    - Tyre levers (two or three, depends how good you are)
    - Rim protectors or bits of plastic bottle (so you don't scratch the rims, depends how precious about your bike you are)
    - A bead breaker (or thick heavy boot heal)
    - Some 4"X4" or something to rest the wheel rim on while you break the bead with your boot, or you will knacker the sprocket/brake discs. Or you can dig a hole in the dirt.
    - Valve removal tool (to take the valve out of the valve stem to deflate the tube enough to get it out)
    - A little spanner (wrench) to remove the lock nut on the valve stem
    - A puncture repair kit (patches/glue) or a spare tube
    - A inflation device (CO2 cartridges, electric compressor or hand pump)
    - Some prior knowledge of how to repair a puncture. Best to practice at home before you need to do it for real.

    Good grief thats a lot of stuff for a puncture? Isn't there any easier way?
    Yeah. Push bike to nearest road. Phone BMW assist.

    Ha Ha. Can't I just plug the tyre?
    No, its got a tube, remember? Should have bought the 650GS.

    What about tyre sealant? Can I use that?
    Bit late once you have a puncture. There are special formula sealants for tubed tyres. Messy stuff though, and it won't work on gashes or big punctures, but it will gloop everything up and make the tube irrepairable. Also, a small nail in the tyre can cause a large rip in the tube as the tube 'squirms' inside the tyre at speed.
    #57
    SmileyO likes this.
  18. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer Supporter

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    Not mentioned: Dunlop D607
    http://www.dunlopmotorcycle.com/tirecatalog_tire.asp?id=83
    http://www.dunlopmotorcycle.com/tirecatalog_closeup.asp?id=83&imagenum=1

    Metzler seems to have two models of Karoos. The MCE Karoo seems to have taller lugs than the Karoo Traveler which seems to be more street oriented. On the Metzler website they call them the Karoo and the Karoo T. My take on their description is that if you want a knobby for riding mostly in the dirt with some pavement you want the Karoo. If you are riding mostly pavement but want a knobby in the dirt choose the Karoo T.
    #58
  19. Motorace

    Motorace Black and Round pays the bills.

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    I was at Max BMW this week and they were asking about the Anakee 2 C type rear that is on the BMW crib sheet.

    That OEM tire is not in the US yet, but is listed in the Michelin big book. It should be here by May.

    With the OEM, it is usually one additional belt for load rating that denotes the difference with an OEM specific fitment.
    #59
  20. Firefight911

    Firefight911 Long timer

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    I was just going to ask that very question. Thanks for the answer! Now I know.:thumb:thumb
    #60