The Adventures of LoneStar & The Iron Butterfly...

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by LoneStar, Jun 22, 2016.

  1. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

    Joined:
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    It was a crisp morning but the sun soon warmed things up. The bikes were loaded and we left Mt. Carmel Junction, riding north on Hwy 89 for Highway 12 east and Bryce Canyon, my ears still ringing from the hotel manager’s heavy cursing at someone on the phone from a back room as I quietly dropped the key... :O

    The tourist village of Bryce came up sooner than expected where we took a break, searched for stickers and watched the bus loads of Asian tourists perusing the gift shop. It was a busy place indeed, as was the park. Initially I thought best to head for Rainbow Point on the southern tip but instead wheeled in at Sunset Point, a good move in retrospect.

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    From the viewpoint, the hudu’s and spires were impressive as was the view, needless to say. It wasn’t long before Kim was wandering down the path for the bottom, me traipsing along behind, somewhat leery of the long hike we might be getting into since I was in my riding pants and boots. She’d changed her clothes after getting off the bike whereas I was lazy and didn’t.

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    It was really a great experience wandering down, down, down the switchbacks into the orange bowels of the narrow canyons. Ever so often I’d look back and pause, mentally preparing myself for the climb out, as well as waiting for the lone Asian tourist ahead with his camera to move out of the pictures. The scale is hard to comprehend from the top and can only be appreciated from the bottom, especially when bathed in the molten orange of the light bouncing off the canyon walls.

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    The soft clay monuments were in various states of fragility and looking up at the massive blobs which had separated and could fall at any time kept it interesting. I suppose to die under a collapse in Bryce Canyon would make an imminently better epitaph than “Killed by a Spider Under His Collar” or worse, “Killed by a Bear Cub at a Children’s Petting Zoo”.

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    As we got out of the chilly shadows of canyon, the sun positively got roasting hot and I regretted being in my boots, the BMW City Pants heavy enough with all the full pockets of keys, camera batteries, cell phone and a lens or two.

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    Still it was great to be down in the canyons and seeing it from a far different perspective. Eventually we found a sign directing us up the Navajo Trail which led back to a different set of switchbacks.

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    The great thing about calling yourself a photographer is the ability to stop and take a break "for a shot” to disguise how out of shape you are. At the top, we had a simple lunch on a split log bench, waving off cigarette smoke from a couple of Asian men, before firing up the twins and heading south for Rainbow Point.

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    Rain was coming from the north in our direction, but the sun stayed with us as we stopped and checked out overlooks until reaching Rainbow Point. By the time we wandered around out there, the sun was getting low and the rain clouds were threatening.


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    Kim entertained herself by tossing cashews to the two black ravens guarding our bikes. They were quite picky about eating, but eventually went for a few nuts. They seemed terrified of the bikes despite having been hanging out so close to them, trying to grab a nut while looking up at the bikes as if they were some large creature waiting to pounce. Had to chuckle. Where I'm from ravens are rare as bucktooth chickens, but I have to admit these guys are big and could kick some Texas crow ass.

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    Kim had gotten a text from our friend Ronetta in Alaska a few day before, that she, her sister and boyfriend were going to be in Utah on vacation and it turned out to be the same week. They had set up an RV at the KOA in Cannonville which was right where we were.

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    As we left the park the storms were just ahead, with beautiful plays of light on the clouds from the setting sun. Kim captured a little of it on her headset cam, which does it no justice, suffice to say people were pulling over to capture it with cameras.





    Luckily the rain never hit us and we made our escape to Cannonville, arriving about dark.




    Kim's phone was stuck on ZZ Top's "Hey Mr. Millionaire" in case you hadn't noticed...

    Ronetta and her partners in crime were no where to be found, even though their 5th wheel was there. We were unsure from the texts if they wanted us to stay with them or not, so we waited rather than trying to grab a tent site.

    The wait went on for several hours as the temperatures dropped. We sought shelter in the KOA laundry, sitting still until the motion sensor light would go out. Inevitably, a guest would come and open the door, only to see two crazy looking people in riding gear staring blankly at them as the light flipped on. We knew we creeped out a couple of people, especially a French woman who had to return a few times, tension and mild fear on her face. I stuffed down the childhood prankster that lives deep within, forlornly missing the opportunities to scare the hell out of people. In retrospect, we were probably scary enough.

    At some point very late our friends showed up, having taken a “shortcut” that took them hours to get out of and having no cell service were unable to let us know what was going on. Luckily we were invited to stay and slept on the couch and floor of their cool toyhauler.
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  2. SpiritAtBay

    SpiritAtBay Been here awhile

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    I think the music really suited the clips, esp the first one. Rock on!
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  3. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Though our hosts wanted us to stay, we needed to move on. It was great getting to see Ronetta, her sister Leola and boyfriend Scott. In fact, they were heading to Moab the next day and we figured we’d all meet up once more before we made it out of Utah.

    It felt good to be on the bikes again, as they’ve become such a normal part of daily life. I’m not sure we’ll ever feel at home in a car again ;-) A short stop for gas at the Cannonville gas station brought a conversation with the previous owner who was filling his car, having retired recently after selling the gas station and hotel combo.

    From there we continued on Highway 12, one of my favorite roads in America. The southern Utah landscape never stops amazing me and I was glad Kim was getting to experience it. The highway through Escalante and on to Highway 24 into Capitol Reef is just great - killer scenery, few cars, and plenty of curves.

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    The brilliant yellow aspens waved and cheered us on as they have since Alaska, contrasting beautifully against the rich blue skies in the higher elevations. The air was brisk and the sun was crisp as we climbed, stopping for a walk in the trees to a view over the valley towards Escalante.

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    Using the binoculars she's carried for the trip
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    After the turn onto 24 for Capitol Reef, we stopped to look at the native American petroglyphs along the roadside.

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    From there we entered the twisting canyons for awhile after passing Fruita, until coming out into the flats near Hanksville. In an attempt to get wifi and do some updates, we decided to try for a motel.







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    Of the two in town, the nicer one was booked of course, and our options fell to a run down one across from an RV park. My walk into the “lobby” was all I needed to both see and smell, opting immediately to camp in the RV park. Instead, we were given a great rate on one of their brand new cabins and couldn’t pass it up. We found out the heat didn’t work and our calls to the office went unanswered.

    The next morning Kim hit the office to tell them of the issue and they refused to charge us for the night. It was just a faulty breaker and we weren’t trying to get a refund, but the clerk insisted.

    Our goal for the morning was Goblin Valley, a bizarre wonderland of goblin-like formations a few miles north of Hanksville. Riding through the plains north, the sky was a lifeless, overcast gray. Paying the entrance fee and rolling into the parking lot, we found the place quite packed with cars and kids.

    My trips through Utah in the past always were absent of people but this time we hit cars and people the entire time. It was a Saturday and guessed a lot of people drove down from Salt Lake for the weekend.



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    The valley was as fascinating to me as the last time I’d seen it, resembling some sort of fantasy set from a movie. Kim was surprised at the size of the hoodoo’s as we walked down into the valley and climbed around and over them.


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    It was a lot of fun as we work our way back into the park and away from the others. It’s truly a crazy place for visuals.


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    "What? Those weren't raisins in the oatmeal????"
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    Eventually, we got back to the parking lot for a fast lunch - made faster by the shrieking kids we wanted to get away from - and mounted the bikes for our trek south towards Natural Bridges and the Monument Valley area. Highway 95 was the road, and the Utah terrain continued to amaze. There was little traffic and it was nice to be able to ride and look at the scenery more than usual.

    A stop at the Hite Overlook as the day was ending was a great break. We walked out onto the high cliffs overlooking the Colorado and the valley floor below. It was such a great place we were tempted to hide the bikes and tents and camp up high but eventually thought better of it. Far below we could see a boat ramp and a building or two, near Hite, making it our next objective for camping. Indeed there was a campground near the concrete boat ramp that now lay a thousand yards or more from the water. Obviously, the water level of Lake Powell was extremely low in comparison to the time the ramp was built.

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    The camping area was basically just a bleak area of rocks with three or four picnic tables and rock pile fire rings. A lone camper van sat at one of the sites, it’s owners’ dog rocketing out from under the van and going for Kim’s bike as we rolled in. Luckily the dog responded to his owner or Kim might have been cooking it for dinner :D


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    It was beginning to get cold and there wasn’t a stick of wood in sight until I saw large piles of driftwood beached way above the water line toward the river. I made a wood carrier from a couple of bag straps and headed off while The Butterfly got the tent up. The walk to the wood was a long one and when I arrived I was excited to see a lifetime supply of dry driftwood covering so much of the rolling rock formations.


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    After a bit, I’d collected a heavy bundle and was trudging the long way home when Kim arrived to help. We both joked about how nice a glass of wine would be by the campfire… but we had none and were bummed. Damb that Utah!

    As we walked up to the campsite, sharing the load, the man from the lone camper van walked up to us and said, “I have a problem and wondered if you guys could help?” Secretly I thought, “Oh God, I just want to get the fire going, get out of my boots and relax and besides, your dog is an asshole”... but I smiled and said “Sure. What’s up?” He responded, “Well, I have this bottle of wine that I just opened and I have no one to drink it with.”

    We all burst out laughing and Kim told him we’d just been thinking how good a glass of wine would be. He laughed and said he’d come back later after we got situated and walked back to his camper. Gee Toto, dreams really do come true!!

    The fire finally roared to life and we sat bundled in our sleeping bags after a quick meal. Our neighbors came over with the wine and some fresh bruschetta she’d made. We talked for hours and had a great time.


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  4. Folly1

    Folly1 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Your photography is over the top and your writing is just as good. Great job. Thanks, Ben.
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  5. ROAD DAMAGE

    ROAD DAMAGE Long timer Supporter

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    You kids still alive?

    Don't make us all worry ...................................... :D :wave
  6. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    The next morning we awoke alone in the gloomy chill, our neighbors having slipped away early. Natural Bridges, Mexican Hat and Monument Valley were the goals for the day.

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    We lingered at the campsite a bit, packing gear and looking for water to replenish the Nalgene bottles and insulated thermos bottle The Butterfly carried. It was found at a nearby campground bathroom facility which featured a large, stainless steel fish cleaning station complete with built-in oversize garbage disposal. The water was sourced from an outside tap and tasted of iron, but it was doable.

    From Hite, Highway 95 flowed through continuing fascinating landscape as we made our way south to Natural Bridges National Monument. If you can ever get the chance, ride Hwy's 95, 24 and 12 through Utah - always one of my favorites.

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    The sun had finally burned through the morning haze by the time we turned into the park and the usual “no hassle” entry with the National Park Pass was a hassle this time, the attendants being a bit rude and demanding to see our ID’s. Chalk it up to newbies…


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    After a couple of conversations in the parking lot with passersby, we made it to the hiking area and enjoyed the climb down into the snake-like canyon and cliffside overlooks. We hung out in the shade of a cliff wall for a while, imagining it as a marvelous campsite. Only the wisp of wind broke the deafening silence.


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    I think the months of riding and camping have been imperceptibly tiring us as we tend to linger longer in places than we did early on.





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    Nevertheless, our friend the sun dictated our leaving as we still had to get to Monument Valley that afternoon. A few stops at overlooks on the way out of the park finished our time there and we swung due south for Mexican Hat on 261.

    Ahead lay Moki Dugway, a series of dirt switchbacks from the high plateau down into the valley with a spectacular view from the top. My last trip up, the road had not been maintained and was pretty rough, and unfortunately, my warnings to Kim had her envisioning an “Ophir Pass” experience Despite my best efforts to convince her it wouldn’t bad, she still was a bit nervous.


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    At the sign, we stopped for some adjustment and water then headed on down. The view is superb and the road was in good shape. In short order Kim was ahead and enjoying the ride with the vista of the valley far below.



    The bottom came soon as did the blacktop road to 163 and Mexican Hat where we gassed up. An old pickup truck next to the pump carried a threesome of Native Americans, a grandfather who looked as iconic an Indian warrior as he could, with what I’m guessing was his son and grandson. I’d have given money to have been able to photograph him, but they were gone quickly, never acknowledging our presence.

    We were starving and a burger sounded good, the only option being the motel and restaurant at the bridge crossing. It was getting late in the day and I knew there wasn’t enough time to make Monument Valley so I checked with the motel and they had a room available for the night. Showers and a so-so burger felt good, with long conversations in the parking lot with other riders and travelers.



    The next morning was crisp and clear as we rode for Monument Valley. The classic view of the sentinels soon appeared at the end of the long straight road, always an impressive sight to see.

    At the pay station for the park on the reservation, I asked the attendant about riding motorcycles through the park, to which she replied they were not allowed on the roads. We parked outside the main buildings and went in to scavenge stickers and take a whiz. The views from the monuments were a taste of what was to come.

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    Despite the motorcycle ban, we geared up and took off past the waiting touring vehicles and idled down the road into the valley. It was anyone’s guess as to whether the sand would be deep on the roads, which were rough from the rock ridges and wheel ruts from the tour jeeps but The Butterfly did well in the loose stuff.

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    We stopped at the main overlook to take in the views so often seen in John Ford’s famous movies, before continuing on the loop through the park. The views are grand and memorable, something not to be missed if you’re in the region.



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    The sand wasn’t too bad, just enough to keep you on your toes - literally - with the unexpected front end wandering when least expected.





    We wound our way slowly through the park, stopping to take in the sights and enjoy the feel of the valley. It is a sacred and holy place for Navajo, and if you take the time to sit and listen, you can understand why.

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    We finally stopped at Inspiration Point and sought some non-existent shade to make our lunch of mac and cheese, complete with grit from the blowing sand. There was an abundance of tourists at the point, so the solitude I’d experienced in past visits was missing, but the view is indeed inspiring and best savored in silence and thought.


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    Since on the trek, we were approaching Colorado and nearing the van we'd left 5 months ago, the circle of this trip has been slowly closing. The weather and our desire have been pushing us south, to see family, get caught up on some business bs and reboot for the next chapter. Kim’s family was having an event that she really wanted to make, so we’d made the decision to get going for Colorado and then Texas. Threatening weather and the general sense that we had been pushing our luck with snow in the higher elevations made the decision to shorten our time in Utah a bit easier.

    Moab was the next destination and we’d received a text that our Alaskan friends were encamped in the KOA there. We wanted to see them once more, as well as Canyonlands and Arches.

    Our initial destination for this journey had been to hit Utah first and explore as much of the back roads and jeep trails as possible in the Moab area, however, circumstances dictated us leaving too late in the year and it was already hot as hell in Moab when we started our trip. Instead, we’d headed for altitude and cooler temps for the rest of the journey. Now that we’d finally made it to Utah, it was bittersweet that we weren’t going to have the time to stay and explore as planned. But as always, Utah will be there and it’s a great excuse for another trip.

    That said, we headed out of Monument Valley on the sandy roads for the entrance, wavering here and there in the sand along the way. The Butterfly handled the 1200 well and I’ve been impressed with her abilities… 5’5” and 125 lbs on a heavily loaded 1200 in sand, mud and rough stuff. We’ve endeavored to keep both bikes as light as possible, but it’s a conundrum when you have to carry enough gear to live off the bikes for an extended time. You find that there is almost nothing left to leave or lose except things like clothing, already pared down to the minimum and the lightest and least of your weight concerns.





    As we wound our way out, passing slow moving vehicles and avoiding sand patches, a final stop was made at one of the main overlooks. The parking lot was crammed with tour vehicles and we had to wait for a clearing to get the bikes up to where we could see. As usual, the folk on the buses were craning necks to see a woman on a big adventure bike. Before I could get off my bike a man walked over and asked if he could take a photo for his brother. He sounded Scottish to me, but then the various lingo of the British Isles has made me pause as to whether they are Irish, Welsh or Scots. Anyway, he said I looked exactly like his brother, who also rode a 1200 GS and he wanted to send him a pic of the rig from Monument Valley. Kim said her knees were shaking from having ridden in the sand for so long and was relieved to be off the bike.





    Eventually, we rolled the bikes down to the viewing area and got another tourist to grab a shot of us. From there we hit the parking lot for Kim to powder her nose and met another rider on the lot. He was a pastor from Houston and had a lot of questions about the GS’s. I’m not much for cruiser bikes, but his was a nice one and he wanted to hear our take on the BMWs since he was seriously considering one.

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    After much chat, we headed north for Moab, the day again getting late. Plans to ride through lower Canyonlands were laid aside and by the time we made Blanding the mac and cheese we’d eaten hours before was gone with a vengeance. A Subway sandwich in the downtown was our salvation.



    We had to make time as darkness was coming, so we hit the throttle north for Moab, enjoying the terrain. The massive “beehive rock” (as I call it) at the entrance road to lower Canyonlands was fun to see again and always a great visual, especially in the setting sun. By the way, does anyone know if that rock is the symbol used on the Utah Highway signs???

    As we rolled on, the clouds came in as did the cold and threatening rain. We finally made the KOA park in the dark, cold, tired and thankfully un-wet as the rain had missed us. There were no tent sites available, only a lone cabin which we snagged for the night.
  7. ricatic

    ricatic n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2016
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    8
    I have been following along for a while...what a great adventure...I just returned to the motorcycle scene after a long break...I am assembling a riding kit and have a question about your Kilamanjaro jacket...How have you liked it ...how has it performed...especially in the rain...

    Regards
  8. gwedo

    gwedo old enough to know better

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    brandon manitoba canada
    love you report . great photos and reading hear. Utah is now on the list thanks and safe travels
    LoneStar likes this.
  9. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Hey Ricatic, if you are talking about this one I'm VERY happy with it. It's been 100% waterproof in hours of rain experienced in Alaska and compared to my older Kathmandu it seems to have fewer extremes of temperature - a bit warmer in cold and a bit less sweaty in the heat. I'm not crazy about the green but The Iron Butterfly says it looks good. It's a bit duller now but I'm a happy clam with it. I suspect the "safety green" will fade to some horrid, pale green vomit color but zero complaints on the build, fit, comfort and weather resistance.

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  10. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    Thanks! Utah is worth the time for sure
  11. RidewithAB

    RidewithAB Just Ride! Supporter

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    I continue to enjoy your awesome report. By chance do you have GPX tracks of the last few days in Utah? Would love to ride some of those unpaved road. Thanks!
  12. ricatic

    ricatic n00b

    Joined:
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    Thanks...that is the jacket I was referencing...it is now available in Hi-Vis...you have made my decision easier...now to get my daughters to surprise me at Christmas...one more question...I wear a 3x size in almost all my current jackets, Carhart and safety gear etc...how do you find the fit???

    Regards
  13. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    I usually wear a 2X in most gear and this is true to size 2X for me, so I'd guess 3X would be correct

    Sent from my SGH-T889 using Tapatalk
  14. juno

    juno Long timer

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    Hey LS!
    I am slowly working my way through your RR. Pretty damn awesome! I am only on page 8 so I don't know if TIB's ear problems are continuing or of you found a solution.
    I taught diving for 20 years and used a concoction to treat ear infections that works amazing well. Divers call it "Ear Beer". It is a mixture of equal parts white vinegar and rubbing alcohol and applied with an eye dropper. Put a few drops in the ear, stick a cotton ball in there to keep it theie and leave it in for about 5 minutes. It is typically used to stop a' swimmers ear' infection in its tracks or to prevent one.

    Going back to reading now!!!
    LoneStar likes this.
  15. asphaltsurfer1

    asphaltsurfer1 CatManDew

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    Glad to see you're still rolling ahead of winter a bit. Safe travels
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  16. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus Supporter

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    It was a cold morning and gray. We took our time in prepping the bikes, slowed by the weather and the prospect of leaving the area for Texas again. We’d been too tired to visit with our friends the night before but hung out with them for breakfast and some quality time before saying our goodbyes and heading for Arches National Park.

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    My first visit to Arches by motorcycle years before had been timed perfectly, dropping my gear at a motel in town then heading into the park late in the day as the setting sun skimmed the orange sandstone. The effect was as if the massive cliffs and monuments, impressive as they are anyway, were made to appear almost as living lava in the orange glow of the sunset. If you time the light right, the color of red and orange on the rocks is indescribable, appearing false in photographs but just as intense in real life.

    Unfortunately, our visit didn’t include such effect as the skies were gray and overcast. Yet, the park and its formations are no less impressive to see.

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    We stopped frequently for short hikes and views, staying for a long time under one of the arches we’d climbed up to, eating a Power Bar and people watching at times, contemplating the ages involved in forming the stunning formations all around. Nothing has given me the sense of the eons of time passed than travel by motorcycle through canyon after canyon across America.

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    Our goal for the day was Grand Junction and the Sprinter van we’d left behind, what now seemed like years before. The gray skies had broken up a bit with patches of dull blue amongst the haze and finally some pure sun as we left the park for Highway 128 north.

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    The road was great, again a favorite from past rides, as we twisted and curved our way towards Grand Junction along the Green River. Highway 128 is a magnificent ride and not to be missed when in the area.





    Allow me to opine, but if you don't have the time or resources to do much traveling, I suggest grabbing your tent and heading for southern Utah. You can do no better for scenery and roads. There are lots of places to camp free on the land, and the scenery is astounding. In the off-seasons of late spring and fall, temperatures are perfect for travel and there are very few people around. Several years ago when I finally got the opportunity to visit the area, it captured my heart and has never let go. Of the few places I've been, Alaska and Utah are my favorites for sheer scenery, perfect contrasts with each other. Just go my friends...

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    By the time we neared I-70, the long shafts of sunlight were gone and darkness began it’s slow creep over the sky. It felt strange and surreal for some reason, traveling at 80 mph and slowly passing trucks and cars as we head towards the Colorado border.



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    Our speed reduced as the darkness came, finally rolling into GJ in cold air and a pitch black sky for a late arrival motel.

    The next day dawned clear and crisp as we headed for Silt and the waiting van. Interstate 70 between Glenwood Springs and the Eagle area is an amazing ride, both for the scenery and the engineering of a highway through it…

    Our arrival in Silt and rolling up to the van brought a lot of emotion. In ways signaling the end of an amazing chapter, mixed with the down to earth reality of what might be facing us in the van. Dead battery? Mouse infestation? Burglary or damage? Thankfully, none of the above other than mouse droppings, a spider infestation and some mud smeared by hand on the van - probably by a kid but possibly someone who dislikes Texans as the plates were obviously and heavily covered with clay.

    We pulled out our base camping gear and extras we’d left in the Sprinter and gave it a good cleaning inside before assembling the ramps and loading the bikes. When we’d initially left Dallas the Sprinter had carried an F700GS and the R1200GSA, but now I wondered if the two 1200’s would fit in the allotted space, the 700 being bit narrower. Other than adjusting the stagger of the wheel chocks a few inches for the heads and bars to clear, the bikes fit like a glove. After packing the bikes and putting the camp gear back in, we had a couple of pieces of indoor/outdoor carpet left over that we decided to toss.

    I looked around for a dumpster and saw a man with long, gray hair and beard sitting in a wheelchair down the way, a dirty canvas tent flapping in the breeze next to him. I carried the two pieces of carpet with me and walked down to speak with him, thinking he could possibly use them. As I walked up I could see into his tent which had just a dirt floor. He was older, with long gray hair and beard, deeply tanned and wrinkled from the weather. He was a paraplegic and wheelchair bound. As we talked, a woman stuck her head out of the tent and then came out, standing behind and making silent signs with her hands and mouthing “He’s crazy” to me. He seemed to sense what she was doing and twisted to give her a look.

    They both were happy to get the carpet pieces to cover the dirt floor. He told me he was wheelchair bound now after spending his life traveling by foot and bicycle over much of south and central America. He looked at me and said, “Do it now and don’t wait." He shared that he had no money and would probably live in this tent for the rest of his life. It was heartbreaking to see yet another man unable to care for himself and destined to live the way he did. As I shook his hand and told them goodbye, turning to walk away, the lady shouted: “God bless you!”. I turned and smiled, and said “and to you as well!” The lady pointed at the crusty guy and shouted loudly “He don’t believe in God” to which he turned and started yelling “Aaaaw yes I do, I just say that to make you mad woman!!!”.

    I walked away to the sound of a huge argument occurring behind me, laughing all the way to the van, sharing the story with Kim as we drove out and onto the long road back to Texas.
    MizzouRider, juno, GRides and 12 others like this.
  17. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,233
    Location:
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Thanks for sharing the story. :clap
    LoneStar likes this.
  18. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2014
    Oddometer:
    2,660
    Location:
    Bay area
    Quite the wordsmith! I always enjoy reading your blog.

    I was contemplating what could have been worse; theft or rats, the dead battery is usually a given.
    LoneStar likes this.
  19. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Increasingly Grumpy Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    18,508
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Thanks for the RR, I've enjoyed reading it immensely. It's blog's like yours that are slowly but surely dragging me to the lure of heartland USA scenery and people. One day in the next couple of years I must take a trip to the USA (and Canada), hire a bike and go for a long ride. Cheers from down under...
    LoneStar likes this.
  20. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,186
    Location:
    South Mississippi
    I normally don't comment on ride reports, but yours is just SO well told, in words, and photos...it's just....inspirational. As my wife and I embark on some planned trips, albeit not as lengthy as yours, were there times/areas/situations that she felt unsafe, or can she add any advice for wives/significant others ? What to do, not do, best gear, items she cannot do without, etc. For example, my wife decided to ditch the pink gear, as she feels this makes her an even bigger target in several areas. She is now wearing grey/black gear, and being that she is thin and attractive, has long hair, etc, and I am young enough, and strong enough to protect her, I don't want to set us up as a bigger target than a female on a bike can be with certain dirtbag types.

    My goal is to keep my wife: A) safe B) happy C) comfortable (as conditions on a mc trip allow, of course). I don't care if it's regarding travel, camping, gear, etc.

    I should add that I typically don't ask for advice, but you guys kept this report so real, that I don't consider y'all strangers.
    LoneStar likes this.