The Africa Twin CRF1000L Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by erey, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    The majority of auto makers use 3rd party suppliers for the vast majority of their components. In some cases it might be a joint partnership (eg: Ford has a joint factory with Getrag), or it might be a completely independent company, or a quasi-independent subsidiary (MOPAR, a lot of the Sprawling Toyota conglomerate).

    You’ll note that above transmission is a ZF designed baseline with extremely minor tweaks, then built in GM factories. Similar is the FCA produced 9 speed that’s the infamous ZF dog - gear design.

    Mercedes hasn’t been Daimler-Chrysler since before the recession; although FCA is still using early 2000s Mercedes platforms to underpin their rear drive cars and SUVs.
  2. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    I had a customer that was a Ford engineer. He was the bastard that was responsible for the plastic timing gear(351 windsor).It was designed to self destruct after 60k and he explained the reason.Really pissed me off as I replaced one in my van on the side of the road in 1983 (about 70k on it)on the Oregon coast.A lot of not complex words were said.Funny that you could not purchase replacement plastic timing gear even through there excuse was less noise which is not the reason.Living in Michigan I have 2 friends that are retired from ford and Chrysler.Pretty unreal some of the shit that goes on there.My last job was working as a top journeyman shipfitter on lcs combat ships.I worked with engineers quite a bit and know what you are talking about.
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  3. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC Supporter

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    FYI... The DECOM list for ships just came out and the first 4 LCS ships are getting cut along with quite a few others. I wish we would have built another platform, the LCS was one of those "looks good on paper" ideas that failed amazingly when put to sea. Apparently the first 4 are all hangar queens used for parts now anyway.

    -Barron
  4. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    Not sure what's going on with it now.Which version is cut?.We built the steel ones and they built the goofy aluminum one in Arkansas.They keep trying to get me to go back but I am having a happy life as a homesteader last 3 years.I am burnt out on the money game and now turned into a biker hippy crossbreed lol.
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  5. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC Supporter

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    I don't. I don't even have a garage. I did notice that it's not just the tires. On my XR650L all the rubber with the exception of the carb boot and rubber intake were destroyed. I replaced everything that looked bad at first, but I kept finding SERIOUS problems. For example the fuel line looked good and had been replaced about two years ago, after some modifications I was swapping jets on the carb and when I rotated the carb the fuel line cracked and broke off. Then I had an oil leak which turned out to be the rubber hoses that go to the "oil vapor reclaimer thing that turns the oil mist into liquid so it can go back into the engine".

    So I looked up this ozone vs rubber thing that I had never heard of. WOW. Lots of information out there on that. What I haven't been able to find is a good way to combat it, but I would like to hear if anyone has had luck with such things.

    Also, when I had the same bike in Virginia where I parked it next to the ocean almost every day for years at work I never had CLOSE to the amount of corrosion that I have been dealing with since bringing it to Japan- where I am still within a few hundred yards of the ocean at work and less than a mile when at home.

    -Barron
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  6. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    Are you near a nuclear reactor.Sorry could not help myself.
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  7. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC Supporter

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    Fukushima is just up the road why? :lol3

    -Barron
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  8. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

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    Here, but lost. Am I lost if i know i'm here?

    The biggest problem is that you (consumers) want the unicorn. Every bloody time.

    In a very appropo example that we lament here all the time, you (consumers) want a lightweight, but sturdy ADV bike which will get 70mpg but have 150 horsepower. You want it to be simple, but you want defeatable traction control and ABS. And cruise control. You want amazing suspension, and want to pay $3 dollars and the lint from the bottom of your pocket for it. Companies have to align their product lineups with as much of that unicornery as possible, and they have to make a profit, so they cut corners.

    I can't think of what the last "cost no object" commercially available vehicle would have been. Mercedes R129 300/ 400/ 500/ 600SL from 1990? W140 280/ 300/ 400/ 500/ 600SE(L) from 1992? McLaren F1? (You see how much those suckers cost when new? And NOW?) Maybe the original Lexus LS400? :dunno

    Same applies for computers, TVs, phones, pens, clothes, etc.

    Economic realities and market forces dictate product design almost as much as the engineering.
  9. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC Supporter

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    Well put.
  10. OzCr0w

    OzCr0w She'll be right mate!

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    Who here has put StegPegz on their AT?
    I have and they need somewhat modifying to do what they are designed for properly

    I'm in contact with them here in Australia trying to resolve the issue but other riders feed back would be appreciated on their experience with them on a CRF1000l.

    Please PM me.
    I don't want this becoming in any way negative as the issue is in process still
  11. pepebayeta

    pepebayeta Been here awhile

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    As I said, I'm not good at explaining complex stuff in little words. So, this time I'll try to just quote and put into context some sentences I have heard in all these 30 years dealing with vehicles and the people who make, advertise and sell them.

    There's this famous american bike manufacturer you may have heard about so no need to give names. Training course to learn and promote new models and "new" technologies.
    I'm talking to one of the factory guys and I tell him we spend so much time at doing some simple tasks on the bikes and sometimes we need another guy to hold in place some huge part when mounting it on the bike because it's way too heavy to hold with one hand while fitting the nut/bolt/whatever with the other and you could fuck up some other expensive part if not done right. Also, some very little changes in the designs would really ease the operation and reduce the time needed to do it.
    The guy looks at me and smiles the same way I do when my dog brings a stick......and replies:
    You don't do that for free, do you? As long as the bikes are made that way, you will have a job and charge good money for it.

    If you think making maintenance difficult, time consuming, tedious and expensive was a collateral effect or something that just happened by coincidence. I can tell you the fairings of the AT had a lot of work and mistakes were not made.

    Some other time I met this nice guy who just retired from a big car manufacturer. He worked in the development of a model I owned. We talked about bikes and cars and roads and travels and stuff. I told him how good that car was and how I find the way to build cars had changed in this time. And, again, I get this priceless reply:
    You know, cars should last ten years. That one we made 25 years ago are still running. The guys in suit and tie want us to make crappier ones.

    Making maintenace expensive/complicated has two main goals:
    -Getting as much money from the customer as possible in the lifespan the marketing guys decided that vehicle has. (this is a bit complicated as it's about the time the customer will keep his expensive brand new bike/car and pay for an expensive maintenance in the official dealer with OEM parts).
    -Shortening lt's life. Once the bike is sold as used, the new owner will probably not take his bike to the officical dealer or do maintenance himself, use aftermarket parts, etc. This user usually doesn't have the skills, knowledge, information, tools and equipment to operate all these "new" technologies. So, in example, he will not do a valve check because it's expensive in the workshop, complicated at home and somebody told him (probably in a forum on the interwebs) the valves on his bike were just fine after three million miles/kms, so no need to check.
    If any of you have worked with any kind of machinery, you know that the fastest way to shorten it's life is by not doing proper maintenance on time.

    It's no secret heat shortens batterie's life. Don't expect batteries to fail in almost brand new bikes (oldest CRF1000 is not yet 3yo). But It's going to be fun to know how much my 400€ ATAS's battery lasts in the long term.
    The argument of centered/close COG might make cost/benefit sense on 16'/17' models with heavy/cheap lead acid batteries. keeping the location for an ultra light/ultra expensive battery just turns that argument into bullshit.

    I could give a thousand more reasons that made me think this way, but it would always be long, boring and unfortunatelly, mostly disappointing.
  12. pepebayeta

    pepebayeta Been here awhile

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    Fixed it for you........???

    I basically agree with your whole post with some little differences in a couple of concepts.
    But for sure the economic (realities or delusions, that's still to see) and market forces totally took over the engineering.
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  13. OzCr0w

    OzCr0w She'll be right mate!

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    I just bought my 17 AT brand new run out , and tore it to bits to give it the usual head-stem extra grease, suspension, bash plates, crash bars blaa blaa, GPS wiring routed under tank blaa blaa.
    Its great to do it all in one hit from new and the best way to get to know a new bike before hitting the trails.

    I think its fairings and general put together is nice. Battery location is ok and out of sight and putting a fuse block under the seat is tidy for having plenty of clear space to mount it.
    Suspension is something else now but standard wasn't appalling either, just not quite ready to go fast over really tough ground.

    I have heard how under powered it is but in the bush its not at all. On-road drag racing a 1290 is going to be a non contest but thats just a head start and he's gonna be in my mirrors in the end anyway eating my dust and not rubber knobs.
    I reckon its pretty close to the best big dirt bike i've ridden yet
  14. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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  15. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    Good on you!
  16. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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  17. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    Haha, yeah, it was exactly what I was expecting. They were nicer to the AT then I thought though. I really hope the 790 and t7 do well. I think it'll be great for our choices in the future.
  18. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    Yeah, the T7 / 790 comparisons are the ones I’m really interested in.
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  19. 97707

    97707 Go Long

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    I'm gonna guess those come down to how much you are a fan of all the electronic gizmos on the 790. If you are all about cornering ABS and multiple modes of TC and engine braking . . . you are gonna love it. If you are a skeptic or don't want to own that stuff after the warranty runs out . . . not so much.

    But some are saying they love the low center and the suspension on the Katie, so it probly gets points there. Rider aids regardless.

    The 790 sells for about $13,500. The T7 is selling in Europe for something equal to $10,000. Riders who prefer simplicity and a bike they don't have to keep taking to the dealer for a reflash . . . might pick the Yamaha at 3/4 the cost.

    And you have to consider cost to own, in addition to purchase price. Even if price were no object, I'd want a good compare on reliability.

    .
  20. Snakeman99

    Snakeman99 Adventurer

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    Was just at the dealer comparing the standard AT and ATAS windshields. I see the ATAS shield has 6 mounting points compared to the 4 for the standard AT. Looks like the extra attachment points are there for the 2 additional mounts on the standard AT windshield support bracket. Anyone know if you can just add 2 acorn nuts/bolts and mount the larger ATAS windshield to a standard AT?