The Africa Twin CRF1000L Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by erey, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. SkipD

    SkipD That looks stickey

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    Pre Filter socks work well to save main filters

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  2. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I'll take all the help I can get! :lol3

    I'm getting pretty excited about this. Took awhile, but found some .050 mm shim stock that wasn't rediculously expensive or in a massive quantity. Currently making a plan for the tools. So the turkey baster, is that to precisely remove oil to reach the 55mm desired level?
  3. MillennialFalcon

    MillennialFalcon Improvement starts with self

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    Sure why not? If that was the playing field/status quo, I'd make due. My kind of riding allows 100 mile gas stops no problem. I guess the relativity I'm addressing is it seems every other American male who can afford a truck owns one that gets 10 MPG doing their 85 MPH down the highway, so I'd still be double the average for my demographic riding moto and my DD, where I do care about economy, gets 33 MPG highway. But do I feel some personal responsibility to save the environment? No, I'm pretty sure I'm going to live to see major ecological collapse regardless of whether or not every motorcycle on Earth gets 20 MPG or 1000 MPG.
  4. Wayward Gypsy

    Wayward Gypsy Been here awhile Supporter

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    Mid-Atlantic
    Coming up on 21000 miles over 18 months (2017 model; manual). I still love this bike.

    moto.jpg
  5. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    If you are near a decent dealer you don't really need a whole kit.They usually have them for tune ups.Often the marks are wore off the ones in there so you sometimes have to take a micrometer to them.For the long service intervals on this bike don't know if is worth it having a whole kit.If it was a moto bike then it would be worth it.Most of the shops around here use the aftermarket kits as oem have crazy prices.
    Amphib likes this.
  6. motosickle2000

    motosickle2000 Been here awhile

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  7. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    Oz
    Good to know. Will add to database info.
  8. 1 Wheel Drive

    1 Wheel Drive Flatus Antiquous Supporter

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    Intake valve clearances almost always decrease with wear. (One notable exception is if there is carbon build up) The wear points are the valve face and valve seat in the head. The end of the stem doesn’t wear much, nor do the cam lobe or cam follower. What this means is that the required new shim from wear will always be smaller than the one that was in there.

    Replacement shims come in increments of .025mm and the spec range is .03mm. What that means is that you will be able to select one new thickness of shim that will put it back into the spec range, but you will have no control over where in the range it will put it. Ideally you want the adjusted clearance to be at the wider end of the spec range so that with continued wear it will remain in spec as long as possible.

    Having a valve with too much clearance is not a big problem. You will lose an immeasureably small amount of performance by not opening the valve quite as much or as long. The big problem is when clearance is too small and then eventually the valve doesn’t close. Big performance loss and potential for burnt valves.

    You can use fine sandpaper and a micrometer to reduce the shim thickness to exactly what you want. Contrary to urban legend, valve shims are not case hardened. You can pretty easily sand them down with a sheet of 270 grit sandpaper laid on a flat surface holding the shim with the tip of your finger and some patience. Rotate the shim under your fingertip occasionally to help get even material removal. Measure often because it’s hard to add thickness if you go too far. Just before I reach the desired thickness I will switch to a finer 400 grit paper to take out some of the microscopic ridges caused by the courser paper.

    Shim kits are a waste of money, IMO. You will never use the majority of those shim thicknesses. When you measure the shims that come from the factory you’ll see they are mostly the same thickness within about .05mm or so, so you will probably only need 2 or 3 of the possible replacement sizes. Problem is that until you measure what’s in there you won’t know what the ones are you need.

    If someone else has already measured the shims that came in their engine and can relay that info it would allow folks to order just a handful of shim sizes to have on hand before starting rather than wasting money on one of those kits. Also, the actual thickness of the replacement shims tends to vary by quite a bit, so make sure that you measure the new ones too and don’t go by what’s printed on them as gospel.
  9. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    Great post, thank you for taking the time. I have never personally performed this yet, so I welcome the education.
  10. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    Nailed it.
    Price point is it.
    And yes I agree they focused in on the wrong thing, and still missed the mark on the DCT in some instances, just ask @twinrider.
    The filters are a TPITA! but...they should be a once a year thing...I might eat those words after I inspect my filters after about 15k km of use.
    That said, I'm rolling past my 1st valve adjustment. Besides the shite suspension, the bike has done everything I wanted it to do and more.
    I still troll the local ad's for 1090s wondering what if(btw...they have gone down in price as well..used shit go figure)
    ..but in the end I made the decision based on assumptions. They were about 70% accurate.
    97707 likes this.
  11. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    Well said.
    I like electronics. Nothing wrong with some help, on cold dark, wet days when riding into work.
    I plan on building/fixing a 2nd gen SV650, just to have fun on. No ABS. FI only..wow eh!
    But on a shit day like today if both bikes were in the garage, the AT would get the nod.
    Did I wish for a bare bones ABS, TC bike this am? hell no.
    They work fine. Had zero issues with my past semi smart Super T (90k km when punted in for AT). The side stand switch almost killed me, but hey...lesson learned, when by passing while waiting for the replacement switch, always solder, and don't crimp the wire.
    I did have to rebuild the motor at 80k due to dodgy rings on pistons, and $2 valve seals that decided that they rather pass oil than hold it back.

    I'm an average rider (ride with faster guys, ride with slower guys..average).
    but on shit days, or long days, I appreciate the safety blanket. It could mean the difference of getting home, or going down the road on my ass.
    Besides, you can always turn it off.

    The filter access gave up priority to a clean look. Stupid I know.
    Not rushing out to get a 790, just so I can inspect my filter by removing the seat. It's going to have its own gremlins.

    On a positive note...we don't have to sync the TBs...:1drink
    davyjones, pepebayeta and bbanker like this.
  12. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    Why not wrench yourself then? I know most of us do just that. Besides, most maintenance intervals are moving further apart. I know that the 42k km valve interval on yammies is awesome. Packaging? not so much. Yes the filter was a doddle to get to (six screws and a hinged tank), but the valve cover, was SSD (Satan's Special Design).
    So for the AT:
    -Filter/oil...easy
    -Air filter..terrible
    -Valves will have me exhaust my entire line up of swear words (likely in three languages).
    But while in there, I'll clean my filters, do a visual once over, and close it up for another season of beating
    -No TB sync

    Electronics need zero maintenance, as long as they don't go sideways...which they rarely do, unless it's a ktm 1290 anything.
    Tons of them in the shop for various software issues. Not hardware. So the new bikes that need a dealer to unlock this and that (790)...dunno about that.
    If I had to go the KTM route, it would be the dumbed down 1090, and that's still no guarantee of reliability.

    I've had/have a few VW TDIs still in my life. You need the software program to do stupid things like re-set the service light, read codes properly, and do lots of other fun shit I don't intend to do. Yes it was some money, but I have never had a single one of my diesels in the shop. Figure out the code, do some research, replace. Keep driving.
    davyjones likes this.
  13. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    nice!
    is that a uni filter set up?
  14. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    I do all my own work on bikes.I was forced to let the mechanic do warranty work and now have a chipped right shroud.Left fork had no rebound adjustment after they replaced my fork tubes.Tried to just get them to give me parts but no because of liability. No warranty anymore so bike never has to see the evil dentist again.
    Lost Cartographer likes this.
  15. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    I am thinking about playing with carbon fiber this winter to make some reproduction parts for a vintage trials bike.I may play around seeing if I can make some new shrouds with a removable panel.I Don't really have a issue with the panels but have to remove my heed bars to get them off.The shrouds are not that hard to remove after I did it the 1st time which involved bad words.
  16. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    not a bad idea. You have long winters too Jeff! :D
    I have to remove all the scaffolding from ALTr. except the lowest bars. :1drink
  17. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    I like everything about the heeds except air filter maintenance. The good part is they stay clean forever as I rarely ride with other bikes.Season starts to get to nasty in u.p around November 1st to ride(if we are lucky)and can be shit to March or April.
  18. Nihon Newbie

    Nihon Newbie Weirdo

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    Dec 13, 2012
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    SLO Cal
    THIS is what I should've done before Alaska. Looks so clean inside the housings!

    1000% Agree, after calibrating your mics, always clean and measure the new shims to double check their thickness, and of course check your clearances after installing everything and manually rotating the crank a few times.
    Junglejeff1 likes this.
  19. FTWeather

    FTWeather KISS army 1976

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    Mar 18, 2010
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    51
    Location:
    Fresno, CA

    Just looking to possibly upgrade also, you seem to be the most experienced buyer seller, owner, etc : ) I am assuming a 2018 AT is 50 state bike and looking to purchase in AZ or NV
    and bring to California. I believe I remember you had purchased out of state also? If so, What was procedure to pay tax and get reg. in Ca? any difficulties? thanks so much for any info...
  20. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
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    Here, but lost. Am I lost if i know i'm here?
    All Africa Twins are 50 state bikes.

    The first bike the dealer figured out my taxes by my zip code and they were included in the price. Went to DMV. Paid only for the registration stuff. Easy peasy. I had this bike shipped to California; DMV (800 number) says it must be on a truck to be inspected at DMV. I get to DMV and they're like "yeah, you need to bring it down."
    Me "um, .... so I called y'all 800 number and was specifically told to bring it on a truck."
    Them "well we're not allowed to inspect it on the back of the truck so it must be brought down for us to do the VIN verification."
    Me "am i supposed to conjure up a fucking gorilla or forklift out of a hat like a magician? Right now? I was specifically told to bring it on a truck. Nobody said i'd have to bring it off the truck."
    Fuckers wasted my time. I rode that shit there the next day. Fuck the "no registration- it can't be on the road' bullshit. And of course I had to wait. Again. Same bitch who said "you have to bring it off the truck" watched me ride it straight to the inspection bay.

    Second bike. Dealer didn't do out of state tax/ anything. Went to DMV, the lady figured it all out. Paid $1800 or something sales tax, registration, etc.
    This one was a ride and drive so it had a temp registration.
    Third bike. Same deal as second.

    Just have all your paperwork with you. It normally takes a couple of days for the dealer to generate one of them (bill of sale?,) they mail it to you.
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