The Africa Twin CRF1000L Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by erey, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. fiveover

    fiveover Disciple of Jesus Christ

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    Alta Loma, Calif.
    Nice jersey!
    cblais19 likes this.
  2. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    I don't think it would sell well...probably get a life time supply of corona beer if one were to buy it!
  3. Shawn595

    Shawn595 Been here awhile

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    Roanoke, VA
    So a 12 pack of corona.... :imaposer
  4. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    they have tons of surplus.
    I think 12 a month for 10 yrs...would be good.
  5. Shawn595

    Shawn595 Been here awhile

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    Sorry Greg. I'm making a bad/dark joke here.

    A 12 pack of corona would be a lifetime supply to me (assuming other beer is readily available).
    Sailor Jack and procycle like this.
  6. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    I always keep some on hand as "sacrificial anodes" so my friends who don't care what they drink don't drink the good (and expensive) stuff. Pearls and swine and all that.
  7. Shawn595

    Shawn595 Been here awhile

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    LOL!!!!
  8. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv 2016 Africa Twin DCT No.272

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    Sep 5, 2017
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    411
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    Arkansas
    Haha
  9. skywalker714

    skywalker714 Been here awhile Supporter

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    May 10, 2009
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    130
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    Gaylord mi
    I have been training for the “plague” my whole life. I have been avoiding people on my bikes since 1968. The perfect storm. I think I will go social distancing.
  10. Black99S

    Black99S Been here awhile

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    Dec 30, 2012
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    Vancouver, Canada
    Pearls before swine
    1967
    One Nation Underground
  11. Moshaholic2

    Moshaholic2 PCUT

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2018
    Oddometer:
    236
    Location:
    Utah
    Did a job tonight that I had dreaded as others had reported having to remove the gas tank, throttle bodies, battery box and relay tray to do....

    Install a Speedo DRD so I can correct the speedometer with sprocket changes.
    -make sure you buy the new style one that has a detachable wire harness from the little black unit (early models you could not separate the two)

    I had a hunch I could do this without having to disassemble half of the bike and I did it.

    It took roughly an hour of fiddling , a few swear words and one bloody knuckle. (Aka anyone could figure it out)

    You'll need a 2nd set of hands for one step that should only take the helper a minute of their time.

    Tools I used:
    One 8" long 1/4" flathead screwdriver with a small diameter shaft.
    One ~6" long flathead screwdriver (size of this one isn't terribly important as long as its not giant)
    One spring puller (the kind you may have from a old 2 stroke .... but even a good wire hanger bent like a spring puller would work)
    5mm allen
    10mm crescent wrench

    Step one
    - the speedo sensor has a piece of electrical tape on it that is wrapped around the plug. This needs to be removed/ripped. I just reached in with the spring puller and lifted up the tape (careful you don't hook any wires)

    Step two (only time you need a helper)
    -from clutch side of engine, reach in with the 8" flathead to depress the locking tab on top of the speedo plug
    -once you have it depressed, your partner on the opposite side, uses the other flathead screwdriver to gently push the plug towards you to unplug it.

    After its unplugged it will look like this:
    View from left/kickstand side
    20200324_211333.jpg

    View of plug from clutch side:
    20200324_211456.jpg

    Now to give yourself a little more operating room loosen the clutch cable holder and move the cable out of the way: ( remove the little relay cover with a 5mm allen first it will allow enough room for the 10mm bolt to come fully out)
    20200324_193903.jpg

    With the clutch cable out of the way you can now get the speedo drd cable plugged in.

    I taped the speedo drd connector to the long 8" flathead and maneuvered it into place from the clutch side of the engine. A little twisting here and there , got it lined up and pressed it onto the plug (you should hear an audible "click" when in snaps on)

    Now feed the long length of the speedo drd lead through the engine, underneath the battery box from the clutch side through to the kickstand side.
    When doing this, make sure you feed in underneath this little white tab, or there will not be enough slack in the other portion of the "Y" of the cable to pass through to where you need it.
    20200324_211601.jpg

    Once its through to the other side gently pull the cable slack through.

    Now, the other plug you need on the speedo drd is likely still under the battery box... from the clutch side again with the 8" flathead, reach in and maneuver it as best you can through to the other side. I got it almost through, then used my spring puller to hook it and get it from the kickstand side. There is not much slack available in the "Y" between the connectors of the speedo drd.
    I was able to hold it in place with the spring puller, while I plugged in the factory connector to it.

    Then just feed the cable up under your seat or wherever you want it mounted.

    Now change between trail sprockets and road sprockets all you want
  12. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    What is involved in calibrating the unit or changing the settings?
  13. Moshaholic2

    Moshaholic2 PCUT

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    Utah
    Its very easy. You just follow the instructions on their site to calibrate. A simple click of a button puts it in +%(green led) or -% (red led) and you click the button six times for 6 and then 3 times for ".3" ( i just made those numbers up as examples)


    http://www.12oclocklabs.com/sdrd_calc.php

    On my other bikes I do it in two steps.
    1)set it according to the gearing calculator on their site.
    2) then verify with GPS (and if its needs additional clicks, use the verify by GPS portion on their calculator to get it spot on)
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  14. William Wolfen

    William Wolfen DR Guy

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    Cypress, TX
    My speedo corrected itself when I put on better tires. TKC80 front and Motoz GPS rear. It's very, very close to my GPS now. I don't think I've seen it more than 1mph off, even at freeway speeds.
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  15. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv 2016 Africa Twin DCT No.272

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    Sep 5, 2017
    Oddometer:
    411
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Almost like...it was made for it.
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  16. redneckmech

    redneckmech No burrito left behind!

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    Jan 31, 2010
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    Somewhere up shift creek sans paddle..
    I noticed the same thing, checked and verified with the GPS that it is 1mph fast at 60mph. I am running a Motoz Tractionator Adventure rear and a Motoz Rallz front.
  17. daytonaKTM

    daytonaKTM Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    14
    This may sound odd but had the exact same seal failure. Got ridiculed by the ORG members for going to the stealer and not just cleaning. got the same runaround at dealer. But since the dealer visit it quit leaking. They did nothing but I had noticed a brake squeak rolling in garage. I loosened the pinch bolts for axle and centered the forks. Forks were being held inward, axle was protruding prior and is now in just a mm or two. No leak from fork. 2017 with 3600 miles. been off pavement maybe 5 times and no mud. If this would be left alone I think the bushings seals etc would have been worn out in no time IMO. Honda needs to step up which if we leave this just pass they won't.
    windowto likes this.
  18. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    Tucson, AZ
    I've removed/installed plenty of rear wheels on many different motorcycles but am I alone in finding that the AT is the hardest damn wheel to get back in place? It's like the swing arm is just a bit too narrow to allow both spacers on each side of the wheel to allow the wheel to slide into position easily. Seems like the cush hub needs to be compressed more in order for everything to fit into the swingarm better. Has anyone used any particular sequence or trick to getting the wheel into position easier? Maybe it's just my particular bike.
    Ian.H likes this.
  19. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    DR650s can be very tough like this. The cush drive is hard to seat when the cush rubbers are new. One trick that works on the DR is to use a few heavy zip ties through the sprocket and around the spokes. Draw the cush hub into the wheel. Put the wheel into the swingarm. Cut the ties.
  20. William Wolfen

    William Wolfen DR Guy

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    The DR650, particularly with new cush rubbers, is far harder than the AT. The AT cush fitment is also much more stable and doesn't flop around like the one on the DR.