The Africa Twin CRF1000L Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by erey, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. windowto

    windowto Long timer

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    Ouch!:arg That is bad, I was hoping for some sturdy bars. But, at least it seems that it will be easy to replace with aftermarket. Seems like no wiring is going through the bars and no other surprises. The operative word is "seems"... I guess we'll find out.
  2. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    I guess I was a bit harsh, so will give more "rider input." The motor doesn't vibrate too much. The throttle isn't overly sensitive. The plastic up front, which I haven't had apart because everything's working fine, does a great job of blocking the wind without buffeting me. The front fender has all its bolts in place and hasn't broken off. Excellent tank range thanks to the stellar fuel economy and runs on regular gas so easy on the wallet. :)
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  3. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    I never said the bike was bad or a dud. I just won't be a flag waving member of the "big Red" fan club. Nor any other manufacturers fan club. I call it like I see it. Constantly looking for positive affirmation's to your ( anyones ) already preconceived ideas, is in no way, a valid method, to obtain a truly objective view of a bike, or anything for that matter. If you disagree with what I, or others see as shortcomings, that's your perogative. But at least accept them as being just as valid as your own.

    This bike here in Australia, is by any measure relatively cheap. That by itself is no bad thing. It makes the bike available and more affordable to a wider market. That cost cutting can readily be seen in a number of areas. One being the less than robust front guard. Another being the tubed rims, clearly a negative in many peoples eyes. I just happen to disagree with that view. Any serious off roader will most likely prefer tubes. Correct me if I am wrong here. But hasn't Woody been asked and refused to convert or modify the std rims to tubeless. I'm sure he has. I'm also sure that there is an extremely valid reason for doing so. The lack of extra ridge in the rims to lock the tubeless tyres in perhaps?

    Honda has banged on about this being a serious mile munching ( my words ) ADV bike ( what ever that is and Honda's words, by the way ). That means big miles in the tank. Which this bike does not have. It's halfway there with, what seems, at this early stage reasonable economy. But it's no good having good economy in tandem with a small tank.

    Oh, by the way, I'm planning to put this bike; my bike to the task that Honda ascribes it to. That is go on a RTW trip, two up as it happens, starting this Aug/Sept. I think it will be more than capable of that task. Short comings aside.
  4. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    I didn't take issue with anything you wrote. Just found it funny that you told everyone else to harden up after listing your complaints. :D
  5. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    No, my "harden up" comment and, your observation of my perceived complaints are two different things entirley.

    I'm sick to death of, "oh, I wish we got the Tri colour here". "Shame on Honda for not fitting tubed rims". "I won't buy it now, no cruise control". All those type of comments are in reference to the "harden up comment". Honda have given us mere minions what should be a very capable machine at a very cheap price. Although many in Nth America have complained about the price as well. if they, only knew how much cheaper than practically everyone else on the planet has to pay they may stop their complaining about the price. So to achieve a low entry point, savings must be made and that is evident.
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  6. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Increasingly Grumpy Super Supporter

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    I agree with gperkins on fuel tank size. My view is the tank size is barely OK and fuel economy is good. Put another way, 18.8L tank size is not good, it is inadequate in my view. This is where barely OK is not good enough. It would not have taken much to make it a 21 L tank then I think the range issues would by and large be manageable. Granted for some routes in Australia it is not.

    I'm also curious why the fender is so close to the tire. Another 5cm higher then the cheap fender would hold in almost any situation.

    After those two comments I have nothing else much bad to say about the one DCT AT I rode several hundred kilometers on. It will be my next bike in time.
  7. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Fair enough but you have to keep in mind that what matters little to one rider matters greatly to another. I can see why NA riders who are going to do loads of super slab to get to where the riding is good would want cruise control and not everyone is keen on swapping out tubes on the side of the road.

    Perceptions can also vary greatly. For example, vibration. You found it to be a problem but for me this has to be one of the smoothest bikes I've owned. Heaven compared to my Super Tenere, which required an ECU flash to sort the poor fueling and mitigate the hand-numbing vibrations. And an upgrade to the newer rubber damped clutch basket to further lessen the problem. Ditto for throttle sensitivity, it's way better than my Tenere. And it has a much lighter throttle pull as well. So I'm very happy with it... The fuel range could be greater, but the tank area is already relatively bulky as is and for most owners the present 400 km range will suffice. For those who need more, surely Safari and others will have a solution.

    Regarding cost-cutting, I really wish the subframe was bolt-on rather than welded. But overall I think Honda did a great job of getting the important engineering points and features right -- like traction control switchable on the fly and an off switch for the rear ABS, unlike the Tenere -- yet bring it to market at a price that undercuts the GS by $10K where I am. The front fender weakness is oft-cited, but how many owners have actually had a problem with it?

    From what I gather, Woody does do conversions to tubeless but won't do it on rims that don't have the safety bead. You can read his input about the Outex system in this thread. http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...s-tubeless-wheel-conversion-kit.770634/page-3

    In any case, looking forward to reading about your adventures on the AT and your mods to make it suit your riding needs. :thumb
  8. jyrays

    jyrays The Wanderer

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    ABS is easy to switch "off" in any bike... lift the rear wheel up, put it on gear and speed over 10 km/h. ABS goes to fault mode (closes itself) and voilà, you have ABS turned of until you switch off the ignition!

    Also if you are in mud just slipping rear wheel fast enough will do the same!
  9. GrahamD

    GrahamD Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    Legend!:bow
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  10. ducouple

    ducouple Adventurer

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    hi,
    i drove around 600km from Paris to Trouville et go back home. 500km on freeway & 100km on roads... have the high screen, good proctection, 5.8L/100km humm not so good. 140km/h most of the time.
    Did my firt step on off road too. Wouu not easy for me but so fun, i do not want to drop my new bike, i think it's heavy to learn off road basics. But i will learn.
    Pic taken at Trouville sur Mer ...
    Enjoy your life my friends.

    Attached Files:

  11. dodgierogie

    dodgierogie Been here awhile

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    6.2L/100 at 140km/h ?? you got to be happy with that economy at that speed :)
  12. cariboulio

    cariboulio Adventurer

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    I eventually got my Holan top-case last Friday and mounted it. Nice width, not too large and not too high but with great capacity though. An enduro type helmet can easily fit into it. Here are some pics.

    Attached Files:

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  13. ducouple

    ducouple Adventurer

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    sorry i made a mistake. Not 6.2L/100km but 5.8L/100KM :)
  14. uk_mouse

    uk_mouse Aquatic adventurer

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    That's about 49 mpg (UK gallons) which is pretty much what I'm getting from my AT at motorway speeds.
  15. GeorgeD

    GeorgeD Been here awhile

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    could you please upload some photos of the top-case rack and how is fastened the top-case to the rack?
    thank you in advance!
  16. FriedDuck

    FriedDuck Why die all tensed up?

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    Thanks! Having to live vicariously for a bit til they touch down here. It's down to this or a used super enduro for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. cariboulio

    cariboulio Adventurer

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    I have only two photos that could help you: one of the rack (black) with holes where the intermediate alu plate screwed at the bottom of the top-case will be fastened (see red arrows) and another one taken from below the rack where you can see the two screws fixing the alu plate directly to the top-box (blue arrows) and the four nuts where the top-case+alu plate are screwed from the inside of the box (red arrows). Hope this helps.
    IMG_3955.JPG IMG_3964.JPG
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  18. jyrays

    jyrays The Wanderer

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    You better have something lighter to practice or you will drop your bike many times!
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  19. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Increasingly Grumpy Super Supporter

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    No, not necessarily. I learnt to ride gravel on 250-280kg so called adventure bikes and haven't dropped one yet:hide. Simple rule is not to push it too hard but gradually increase your level of riding.

    Granted though, a lighter bike to learn on would have been the best thing to have done and is the best advice :nod
  20. Ham

    Ham Long timer

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    Gees that's getting down into my Stelvio's area for mileage per gallon. Hmmmm