The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Hmm... staying at hotels and eating in restaurants? Totally doable in moto-pants with suspenders (for me).
    Since I don't bring other footwear than the sg12's, a nice set of pants wouldn't help much with the appearance anyway :lol3

    Downsides? Yep, if the pants and/or boots are wet it's not too fun.
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  2. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Just keep in mind those hiking pants don't have much in the way of abrasion resistance.
    I reckon you can find good "adventure riding" pants, one have to be willing to spend some time on it though...
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  3. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I've hiked in MC boots when a spontaneous opportunity presented itself. If I was planning a good walk every day, I would definitely take some (light weight, of course) walking shoes or hiking boots along.
  4. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Same here, though that was back in the day when motorcycle boots had more in common with hiking than skiing ones.
  5. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

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    Mosko Moto Woodsman pant looks plenty nice enough for an evening at the bar or restaurant. And the abrasion resistance is excellent. This is what Moscow designed these pants for, both on and off the bike. I just like to put something fresh on at the end of a days ride and usually carry the kuhl because they’re so compact.
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  6. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    The town clothes are for the moments in between. Spend 24/48 hours on a boat going to your destination it is very nice to wear something different.

    The same goes for the camping/hotel break after a week of trails.

    But it’s a good conversation. Town clothes are luxury. My riding pants hide my private parts pretty well so the pant function is covered. My riding boots get me from a to b without looking like a barefooted hippie. So it’s luxury that takes up space and adds weight.

    Shirt, pants, boxer, socks: 452 grams
    Nike flyknit shoes: 432 grams

    884 grams to feel better in between. Is that worth it?
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  7. Hobbomock

    Hobbomock I's wide open

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    I picked up a microfiber pair of pants from Aerostitch that convert to shorts with zip-off leg sections. They dry quickly and stay wrinkle free when rolled up. I wear them beneath my leathers when temps dip below 50F eliminating the need for thermals. Serving three purposes as city clothes, insulation and shorts or swimming trunks. They're light weight and roll up compacted to less than the size of a can of beer. I've used the leg sections as a towel after my morning swim in the creek I'm typically camped next to.

    IMG_7447.jpg

    Nevermind the deer skeleton I spied at the bottom of this hole while rinsing off the soap, my expression hints at the water temps in NE TN in May :lol3
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  8. JohannesD

    JohannesD Adventurer

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    I’m a few pages behind, but I just read someone suggesting skipping a stove all together. At first I thought «are you crazy? What about coffee?». Then I though to myself «well honestly the instant coffee can barely be called coffee» (I’m a coffee snob, sorry). If I want better coffee on the trails I need to bring a grinder and beans (more weight/stuff).

    Then I thought I needed the jetboil for food. I usually only eat MRE for the simplicity, but those are extremely expensive, and honestly not very good. There’s always food to be bought when I’m out riding, if not I can survive on bread/snacks for a couple of days.

    Gonna try next trip without a stove and see how I like it. Thanks for listening to my rambling/monologue.
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  9. Hobbomock

    Hobbomock I's wide open

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    Matches and birch bark. One of the pleasures of riding in the eastern U.S.

    IMG_7276.jpg
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  10. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Joooooin uuuuuusssss

    Seriously though, I’ll be curious to hear your thoughts. I find I run pretty damn well on protein bars, beef jerky, dried fruit, nuts, and the occasional cheese stick or hard boiled egg from the “fresh food” cooler. I pick a couple luxury foods that are hard to find but help with morale, like dried mango or quality cured meats, and buy them before the trip. I hit grocery stores for real food and fresh veggies when the chance comes up, and stop at diners when I can.

    For me, giving up cooking also means being free of doing dishes, messing with fuel, having moths flapping in my face to get to my headlamp, etc. and like you said, the food really doesn’t end up much better anyway unless you really commit to it. It also means I get to spend more time riding because meals are faster.
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  11. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I don't find it difficult, time consuming, or weighty to boil two cups of water and pour it into a bag, but the advantages to skipping a stove altogether are real.
  12. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    For the odd hot meal on a trip, one of the self heating ones do fine imo, and unlike a boiler-setup, all the weight can be ditched after finishing the dinner.

    Edit: there’s a connection to fire in our caveman-brains though, and whether the flame comes from a cooker or a log fire, I find that it provides some sort of mental comfort.

    Edit 2: it sounds a bit nutty, I know :lol3
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  13. JohannesD

    JohannesD Adventurer

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    @smackyface Exactly. This summer I rode the TET here in Norway. The riding was so good I ended up riding 12-15 hours per day, and when I set up camp I was exhausted. The feeling of getting a hot meal placed in front of you in a restaurant or whatever you find roadside, wearing your full gear and just being exhausted but also so happy for the good riding and scenery is just priceless.

    @ZoomerP I dont find it being a hassle to boil water and make coffee, but as you say, the thought of just skipping the whole stove altogether is tempting.

    Edit: this is my now sold T7 with Mosko R80s completely packed to the gills. I now ride a DRZ and I pack 1/3 of this. Packing everything into a 35L drybag that goes across the back. Will make a list when its all ready like others have. I liked the quality of the Mosko bags, but I didn’t find them very practical - having to take everything out of each leg to get to the bottom.

    Pic related (TET this summer)
    F913890A-87E8-4E39-8CEF-83984B6C4A88.jpeg
  14. krax

    krax Adventurer Supporter

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    For roughly half the weight of one MX boot, it's worth it to me. Even more so if I've trimmed the fat elsewhere.

    If camping is off the menu for the night, then shenanigans are on the menu. I pack a set of town clothes that'll work well enough in a nice cocktail bar or upscale steak restaurant if there's one around.

    To be fair, my set of town clothes are actually approaching four pounds with a button-up shirt, jeans or khakis, and a pair of Lems shoes.
  15. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I down-sized from a Jetboil to a micro-stove that fits inside a large titanium cup. If I have to have gourmet coffee or instant oatmeal in the morning it's quite sufficient. Most of the time, however, I grab a power bar and head out to find a cafe. If you're truly in the wilderness that's a different matter, of course.
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  16. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    Yes it is. But, assuming you are buying gasoline at some point during the day, or every few days, you can almost always find some kind of food for sale to take along. It might not taste very good or provide much nutrition beyond calories but you won't starve.

    Personally, a hot meal on a cool evening or morning makes carrying a small stove and cook gear worth it but it's a choice.
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  17. Cafeguzzi

    Cafeguzzi Been here awhile

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    before i hit camp i buy a can of beer or two, some nice local microbrew, for the campfire.
    i keep the empty can till the morning, rekindle the fire, fill up the beer can with water and heat it up.
    a satchel of Via coffee from starbucks or two thrown in constitutes my morning coffee. sometimes a grab one of those single dose half and half which one could find at the gas station.
    if i'm on a campground i often get the stares from the neighbors who assume i drink beer for b/f and then swing my leg over the bike and ride off.
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  18. Big Tall Bastard

    Big Tall Bastard Voice of Reason

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    +1 on the Lems shoes. Super light and a real shoe rather than flip flops
  19. sharpie1

    sharpie1 Long timer Supporter

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    Curious which Lems would be good for hiking around camp? I have some super lightweight/packable cheap shoes but they kind of suck when hiking, the soles are very soft and you feel every pebble. Are the Lems soles somewhat rigid?
  20. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

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    I like the sounds of this. Can't see the pics though.
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