The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. ADV Wanderer

    ADV Wanderer Been here awhile

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    I think @ERU could use another water filter story!

    About 10-15 years ago I was travelling in China on business, so I brought along my SteriPen to use on the hotel tap water for things like brushing my teeth etc. While at the airport to catch a domestic flight, flying between Chinese cities, the TSA-equivalent guy found something interesting in my bag. So he pulled out the Steripen, all confused about what the heck I was taking on the plane (it looks like a small florescent tube stuck to a handle, like a lightsabre). Of course he didn't understand English and I couldn't speak Mandarin. Luckily I was travelling with my local Chinese colleague, so I had to get him to understand what it was, so he could explain to the security guy what it was, all without insulting either of them on why I would distrust Chinese water. Fun times!
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  2. sharpie1

    sharpie1 Long timer Supporter

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    So you drink straight from ponds, creeks and lakes-and don't worry about giardia or other nasty shit?

    ETA: I think we are talking about completely different water sources. Filters are for creeks, rivers, lakes, even ponds (sometimes), not talking about filtering tap water.
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  3. ADV Wanderer

    ADV Wanderer Been here awhile

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    It puts hair on your chest! :gdog
  4. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    Well it all depends on where you are riding. I'm not familiar with Romania but even in the most remote areas of North America there is a good chance that rodents have infected natural waters with the giardia parasite cyst. Up until the mid 1970s you could drink out of a mountain stream without concern. A bout of giardiasis is no fun. Most places these days that's the only concern but it appears that sheep herding has infected some waters with tape worms.

    Venture into Africa, Indian subcontinent, parts of Asia, or central or south America and you have the risk of cryptosporidium, amebiasis, cholera, typhoid, campylobacter, shigella, enteroviruses, hepatitis A, norovirus, and rotavirus.

    Sometimes there is no tap water within a day's ride.

    20120727_155356.jpg

    Here in the US there is a saying "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." It means it is better and easier to stop a problem, illness, etc., from happening than to stop or correct it after it has started. Filtering water is easier than treating giardiasis.
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  5. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    A few years ago my family and I flew to Nairobi to work in a village in Southwestern Kenya. We arrived around midnight and were dehydrated and thirsty from the 20+ hours of flying. We arrived at our hotel after all the shops were closed but there was a big pitcher of water and glasses on a table. We had no idea whether the water was from bottled water or Nairobi's tap. The Steripen was worth its weight in gold at that moment.
  6. krax

    krax Adventurer Supporter

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    I haven't needed to filter water on a moto trip yet, mostly because I'm already stopping for gas and refilling my water at the same time. That said, I always take a small filtration kit with me.

    Now that you don't need the syringe to back flush the filter, I carry the Sawyer Squeeze and one bag for collecting water. The collection bag rolls up around the filter and the only extra part is the small coupler for cleaning the filter. I could probably ditch that since I'm not usually using the filter anyway. My main water container (other than the reservoir on my back) is a Cnoc water bag, so I'm able to set up a gravity system if need be.
  7. ERU

    ERU Been here awhile

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    Usualy I take water from a spring so I do not even consider filtration, but it is not uncommon that I use water from small alpine creeks and I do not filter that either. Unusual I have drink water even from bigger creeks or even rivers and I was just fine. I have used a filter only in Danube Delta because it was a 2 week trip, with a cannoe and we could not/want not carry so much watter, so we drink the water we were floating on. I'm over 40 now and not a problem. Also I have traveled and ride and hike on 3 continents and not even once have or used a filter. This does not put hair on my chest just because in my contry [and not only in my cuntry ] this is common. I mean I hike pretty often and meet other people and I did not see ppl using filters.
    I remember I was a teenager, and I was hiking on mountains in my country and have camped nearby a mountain hut. I/we nooticed some german guys that boil some kind of soup [dehidrated] and added some tablets in the boiling water, a girl from our grup asked them about and when we find out everybody [not just our group there was a bigger camping spot] laugh so hard that the pour guys get embarassed.
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  8. NoelJ

    NoelJ Long timer

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    Drinking unknown/untreated water is like riding without a helmet: It's great. Until it ain't.
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  9. krax

    krax Adventurer Supporter

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    Hairy chests or untreated water?
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  10. Carl_Mega

    Carl_Mega Been here awhile

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    If you live in the western states where free range is the norm... filtering your water is in your interests. More natural occurring stuff, like Giardia, sucks and is prevalent. If you've been a back/bike packer for any length, you'll know someone who has had it. Even the careful. But sure, many of us chance a known spring - even that slightly radioactive one in Moab.
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  11. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    It is theorized is that people habituated to dwell in lesser hygienic conditions throughout their lifetime have naturally acquired better immunity and more resilience against many infective diseases. The converse is that people living in hyper hygienic conditions lack naturally acquired immunity against many infective diseases.

    An example is when Europeans arrived in the Americas carrying germs which thrived in dense, semi-urban populations, the indigenous people of the Americas were effectively doomed. They had never experienced smallpox, measles, or flu before, and the viruses tore through the continent, killing an estimated 90% of Native Americans. When you visit a place where the climate or sanitary practices are different from yours at home, you have an increased risk of developing traveler's diarrhea. Travelers to Mexico from the US call it Montezuma’s revenge, because the first contact between the indigenous civilizations of Mesoamerica and Europeans took place during Montezuma’s reign, and he was killed during the initial stages of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire.

    What works for you would likely land our tender immune systems in emergency care.
  12. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    As a nurse and an amateur epidemiologist, I do have a theory about this. In just over 200 years, our society has come form the industrial revolution to creating AIs. We have had antibiotics for 80 years. Antivirals for the past 30? We are evolving faster than our immune systems. Look at the spike in auto immune diseases. Look at how sterile our environments are. There is hand sanitizer on every counter (and rightfully so!!). I believe that our immune systems are so highly developed, that they are bored and fighting their own bodies with nothing left to fight. Look at the spikes in ALS, MS, autism, psoriasis, colitis to name a few. I am far from an expert, but there has to be something there.

    Wait, what forum is this? The Art of Packing Light? Fuck.

    Mods, place this where it needs to be. I've said my $0.02 in the wrong place. Sorry y'all.

    Tahoe
  13. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I don't think it's that simple. High concentrations of people are more prone to spread diseases, at least some of them. I'd also need some convincing that most people aren't susceptible to some micro-organisms, regardless of the level of sterility of their environment.
  14. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Ok back to packing stuff.

    I’m hunting a good full down sleeping bag. I know what brand I’d like and they offer the option to go for hydrophobic down at some additional cost.

    Is that worth it?

    I believe I have some experience with regular down in the Uniqlo light down jackets but I’m not sure. Uniqlo mentions very little about their down product (not even filling power).

    So to hydrophobe, or not hydrophobe?
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  15. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    On the subject of stomach bugs and experiencing unknown germs while travelling, don’t forget that alcohol has sterilizing properties - so make sure you pack that whiskey :lol3
  16. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    I’m generally for everything that help the down not to pick up moisture. Not having to deal with a wet bag is worth some $$$.
    Depends on where one usually camps though?
  17. ERU

    ERU Been here awhile

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    +1 for hydrophobe even if I chosed a quilt ;).
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  18. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    There's this to consider, from a high end manufacturer.

    https://www.westernmountaineering.com/faqs/
    upload_2021-10-18_6-43-27.png
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  19. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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  20. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Not surprised the treatment gets washed out in time, but I think the same applies to the natural fat/oils. Wonder what occurs first?
    Wish a non-manufacturer could make an objective statement on the benefits of down treatment.
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