The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Doctors use a medical device to assist in the insertion. You can picture what it was like to try and shove that thing down my own throat lying on my bed:lol3. My high hopes of were dashed quite quickly. Talk about desperation to shave weight and bulk haha.
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  2. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    Fyi, the tube increases resistance to air exchange in and out of the lungs. While it will keep your airway open, it will make it more difficult to breathe.

    Some of you guy’s are over the top....counting grams of weight on a moto. But! Thanks for taking this to the extreme. It’s good research for those of us who can accept another pound or two of bulk.
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  3. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    Bottle of booze and pain killers. Pound the booze and pass out without worrying about how uncomfortable you would be sober. Chase the pain killers down in the morning with any left over booze and get back to riding.
  4. Joe Motocross

    Joe Motocross Adjustafork.com - CEO

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    This is along the lines of what we call the “lightweight shelter”: Ambien. Rain starts in the middle of the night and you don’t have any cover? No problem! Pop a couple Ambien and you’re good to go. I’ve seen it done by my riding buddy @Buuurrrt
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  5. ryder1

    ryder1 Long timer

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    Most people get knocked out before the tube gets close to them. At least that is my experience.:lol3
  6. baldman1

    baldman1 Long timer

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    Yeah I was out when they put it in but awake when they removed it. Not something I ever want done again.
  7. Joe Motocross

    Joe Motocross Adjustafork.com - CEO

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    I've been messing around with the silnylon material for a tarp. Weird stuff. Super light and very slippery. Very much like ripstop. Kind of hard to fold and roll small because it holds air pockets. I'm sure I'll get used to it. Not sure how the light weight material will perform as a ground cloth compared to heavier stuff, we'll see. Anyway, I bought 5 yards of it and have been screwing around with how I'm going to use it. Currently I'm thinking that I'll cut it a 11 feet so I have a 5'x11' piece. This is the best configuration I could figure out without having to sew two pieces together.
    FE3E2BC2-C7BB-45A5-B4C8-B9A6C5156724.jpeg BFB394C5-50F2-47F5-934C-AF4D0E8A6099.jpeg E7C89C4A-740C-4F17-B33D-640F95AA6737.jpeg

    I used a couple of nuts for anchor points. I've used 1" rubber super balls before on ripstop tarp shelters. I'm thinking I want something smaller than 1". Any suggestions? Or perhaps someone has another method for making anchor points? Also, while I'm trying to go lighter and smaller, I want to replace my ropes with a minimal style cord. What do you geniuses use? @Sparrowhawk ?
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  8. Cro59

    Cro59 Been here awhile

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    I've used pebbles and even dirt. No weight added to the bike that way.
  9. RJAMT

    RJAMT Who remembered the winch? Supporter

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    Joe - you can use pretty much anything.....as long as the wind stays calm. Whether you purchase titanium or whittle your own from wood you will want real stakes in wind to keep the tarp in place.

    Since you are interested in small/light you should take a look at Dutch Ware Gear. Dutch has some pretty ingenious little gadgets that I have found very useful. He also sells the components to "roll your own" gear; fabric, cordage, insulation, etc.
  10. MapleRoad

    MapleRoad Been here awhile Supporter

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  11. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Spectra and Dyneema cord (trademarked names of the same gel-spun polyethylene material from two manufacturers) is the strongest you can get for the size. ZingIt cord has a 500 pound break strength for a 1.75 mm (1/16") diameter. If you want stronger cord there are others like New England Spyderline where a 1/8" cord gives you 1,200 pound strength. I made a Z-Pulley using that stuff. I'm looking forward to the morning when my buddy finds his 990 Adventure strung up in a tree. :jack

    But, if you're a travelin' light fanatic you can't beat the newer braided fishing lines of the same material. 100 yards of 0.75mm line at 200 pound test for $10. Keeping it untangled is the challenge.

    [​IMG]
  12. rat

    rat Dirty Hippie

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    My tip? For noobs... take everything you think you'll need, but write it all down in list form. Check off everything you use on that trip, every time you use it.

    Then when you get home, look at that list. Put stars next to things you maybe didn't use, but 100% need... shit-tickets, raingear, extra socks, tools, etc.

    All the stuff leftover with no checkmarks,? Get rid of it.

    Do this for the first few trips you take. If you buy something while on the trip... maybe add that to the list.

    Eventually, you get down to the "Just what I need" stuff. it doesn't need to be space age super light shit, either. Hell, My rain pants are big ol' heavy-ass rubberized overalls. They get rolled and secured with reflective Velcro bicycling pantcuff straps, and strapped atop my gear where I can reach it. The Velcro straps go around my ankles when I wear them. . They're heavy, they're bulky... but they have outlasted every single pair of expensive "bike specific" rain pants I have ever wasted money on.

    IMO, it's not about "packing light" as the goal. Packing "right" will result in a lighter, smaller load. i.e. Cotton socks are a "wear 'em once" thing. Wool socks you can get a couple days out of them. A single pair of one-piece stanfields is the ultimate under layer. If you don't cook in camp... then don't pack cooking gear "just in case". Most of it's common sense, but it's super easy to overdo it when you're new to it. Make a list, tailor it to suit YOUR rides.
  13. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

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    Don't try to fold or roll, just grab a compression bag about the right size and simply push it in, always seems too much to fit but it will go....
  14. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Regarding alcohol stoves:

    I found that if my trip is <4 days, my alcohol stove setup will save space and weight. I took the time to weigh the fuel I needed each day for coffee and meals and compared the weight to my Jet Boil (yes, I am so nerdy I weighed the butane fuel canister before and after use, then averaged the weight over a number of cycles).

    However, alcohol stoves are finicky things. They are great if you have a level surface to place it on, free of potential combustibles and wind. The fuel is clear, so even a little spill may not be noticed until you light it and see a snake of blue flame illuminating what was spilled. The Thermarest Z-pad can be used as a wind shelter for the stove (in addition to all its other uses I have found and posted earlier).

    I have used my alcohol stove on 5 or 6 backpacking trips, but I keep going back to my Jet Boil. I wish it was less bulky, but it is just so damned easy to boil water. It only takes seconds to set up, and my water is boiling much faster than with the alcohol stove I have. With the Jet Boil, I don't need to worry about wind, and I can use it on almost any surface without fear of starting a forest fire. If I am traveling with buddies, one of us carries the Jet Boil, and everyone else just carries a fuel canister. I've got it down to a pretty tight system where I set up my tarp, then light the Jet Boil, set up my hammock while the water boils, pour the water into the meal, then finish setting up camp while the meal rehydrates. By the time it's rehydrated, My camp is set and I can sit in my hammock, under the tarp, in dry clothing, while I eat. With the alcohol stove, I have to babysit it while the water is boiling. And if it is raining hard, forget about it. Since most of my rides will have at least one night/day with heavy rain, I don't even bother to take the alcohol stove anymore. Also, imagine trying to use an alcohol stove in the vestibule of a tent or under a rainfly while it is storming...one would need to be very careful to prevent a disaster.

    If you are super hard core, and you eat dehydrated meals, you don't even need to carry a stove. One can rehydrate food using cold water, but it takes much longer. With boiling water the typical dehydrated meal takes 10-15 minutes to rehydrate. If using cold water it can take up to 2 hours, so plan ahead. I have never gone with this method but it's good to know it can be done if I run out of fuel. I do worry that cold-rehydration before stopping for the night would end up in a big mess on an off-road moto ride.

    Regarding bags vs. quilts:

    I have both, but I use the Big Agnes system if using a sleeping bag. With the BA system, you just slide your air mattress into a sleeve of the bag. Less weight, and you don't need to worry about sliding off your sleeping pad all night.

    Since I got a quilt, I only us my bag if I am anticipating very cold nights, and I will be sleeping on the ground.

    +1 on Dutchware. I use a couple of their items on my hammock/tarp system.

    If making/modifying a tarp system, I have had the best results with Dyneema cordage. I learned how to splice by watching a bunch of YouTube videos and purchasing a $3 tool off of Amazon. For example, my MSR groundhogs are permanently spliced to very strong, lightweight, Dyneema cordage. My rain fly utilizes Dyneema cordage, splicing, and prussik knots. Whoopie slings are another interesting skill to learn. One of my summer projects is to make a tow strap with Dyneema cordage and whoopie slings.

    A couple years ago, I bit the bullet and purchased 2 Cuben fiber tarps for my wife and I. BEST INVESTMENT EVER!

    [​IMG]

    The price was shocking, but since my kit allows me to set up, sleep, and take down in the rain without getting my sleeping gear wet, I find that we spend far less time in hotels. The items paid for themselves on the MABDR. We were out for 9 nights, and only spent 2 nights in a hotel. One night was after 3 days of non-stop rain and we had trench-foot, the second night was because I needed wifi for a work obligation.
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  15. Berchunis

    Berchunis Been here awhile

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    My idea of packing light on a motorcycle was a Cell Phone and a Credit card. GPS on the bike gave me directions to a Motel.
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  16. navi

    navi Been here awhile

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    That makes perfect sense
  17. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    MSR Groundhogs are very lightweight and durable, but don't grab sand very well.

    Sand anchors may be an option for you; a couple lightweight nylon bags, fill them with sand, attach your guy lines, then bury the bags in the sand. Just an idea, but probably not very practical unless all your rides end up in deep sand.
  18. tlub

    tlub Long timer Supporter

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    With regards to light weight stakes, a bag of gutter nails (9" long, hard Aluminum) from Home Depot, Menards, or Lowes, or wherever, are great. They will bend if you insist, but are pretty stiff. And cheap and light.
    And with regards to (homemade from cans) alcohol stoves, I have set surfaces on fire way too easily with them. The priming fuel seems to always spill more than I thought, and that invisible flame is a pain. I keep telling myself to get a Trangia, or at least try one. But I haven't, and continue to use my Coleman 533, which can burn white gas or unleaded from the carb bowls. It's just so easy, controllable, and I always have fuel.
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  19. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

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    Alcohol stoves are my choice, plus I like to wave my "green" credentials around as it's a renewable fuel. If I can boil water, I can feed myself.

    Trail Designs make some great stuff, from cheap to very exxy, but the basic idea is brilliant, a cone to match the pot you use, way more stable than gas stands, run them in the wind/rain, or even burn a few twigs.
    Time to boil water is never an issue for me, I'll pull up at the end of the days riding, crank stove up, potter around and put up tarp [ Trailstar ] lay out sleeping arrangement, cast an eye over the bike, by then the water is boiling [ 6/7 mins ] throw in pasta/cous cous/rice, usually add foil packet tuna or chicken or similar. Quite happy to cook under tarp as well.

    End of the day, about 15/20mins, camp is ready, bikes checked over, I'm eating something hot, all very relaxing......
  20. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    I can't believe you are considering self-intubation!!

    Intubating adults usually is done with rapid sequence intubation: strong opiate, a sedative, then a paralytic. Even then it can be difficult for a skilled professional to intubate. When I was younger, I had to be intubated a number of times for craniofacial surgeries. I was deemed a very difficult intubation, so the anesthesiologist had to do it while I was awake. Straight up horror show in my opinion.