The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    I spent a ton of time backpacking before I ever got into ADV riding.

    I can easily take less than 10lbs of gear while backpacking, and that is everything including the backpack and clothes on my body, for basic 2-3 season trips.

    25 years ago, that was a big deal, today, that is someone who is taking too much weight, lol. Go cruise the forums or watch YT vids, anyone can kit themselves up ultralight now. All the information is out there.

    When ADV riding, I just added the stuff I needed for the bike, plus my riding gear, and away I went.

    Turns out, I carry more weight for the bike, then I do for myself (not including riding gear).

    Tools, tubes, pump, misc bike stuff etc.....

    (After spending a few weeks out ADV riding, I am right now going through all this stuff like I do my backpacking gear to get it down to the minimum)

    I think the key to packing light is to realize you don't need that much stuff to be comfortable, and you can't let your "what if this happens", "What if that happens" fears over take you. Let that happen and you will bring everything.

    Also, if you constantly bring extra stuff and are saying, "oh, it doesn't weigh that much more, I will just take it." Stop that, it adds up to many pounds.

    Then once you have it down pat on what to bring, you take the lightest you can find of each item. This will drop many pounds off your kit.

    For the camping gear, look to the niche businesses that cater to ultra lightweight backpackers.

    Packing light is a mindset.

    Take the minimum needed to achieve your goal/priorities, then take the lightest of each item on that list of what to take.

    Go over everything, weigh everything, leave no stone unturned.
    ACR, phreakingeek, Zubb and 2 others like this.
  2. ryder1

    ryder1 Long timer

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    FTFY
  3. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

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    I took as good old fashioned ball busting. Intent was in good humour and jest. My 2cents.
  4. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    The entire thread can be distilled into these three sentences. :clap

    The great variability between the fanatics is the goals/priorities of each ride. Is it your time riding a dirt bike? Is it getting a knee down in the canyons? The joy of cooking and paired beverages? The sensual pleasures of a passenger/partner? Nature, music, poetry, literature? Comradery with close friends? Exploring exotic places and cultures? Insert your goal/priority here. It doesn't really matter, the results will differ but the mindset and process of packing light is the same.
  5. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    ......... and then, add a chair.







    :hide





    ok, and maybe a midsize boy scout axe. But that's it. No more! .............. wait,.. I need that inflatable sink . . .
  6. Joe Motocross

    Joe Motocross Adjustafork.com - CEO

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    Silnylon tarp is a big upgrade. Deploys in less than 5 minutes. Anchors to the front wheel, handlebar, rear wheel and two stakes/rocks/trees.
    88F3F93A-47A0-4AEE-AFC6-4A4719197492.jpeg

    I used gorilla tape wadded up with the sticky side out, grabbed them in the tarp and looped the cord around for anchors.
    5576A01A-9634-4226-920D-D4433F5B2275.jpeg

    I lit a candle and ran it around the edges of the Silnylon to “finish” it. Keeps it from fraying.
    8E92E4E7-3C08-4368-A1B6-2910247F41AE.jpeg

    I went with the aluminum roof gutter spikes instead of actual tent stakes. Love that idea! Nothing fancy for the cord yet but I use so little I don’t think I need anything more.
    2C1934E1-9A06-40F9-A0C5-C13B41ACD5F7.jpeg

    The thing packs really small. I’m holding it next to my pad and bivy.
    53553663-3EC9-491D-83D4-889BA725D32C.jpeg

    And the dam thing weighs less than 10 ounces with 2 stakes and the cord.
    BFCB5793-BCF1-4AC4-BC23-BCFBBFD17C30.jpeg

    Tarp, pad and bivy is all I need for warm weather. I wrap the whole thing in a small piece of pack cloth that also doubles as ground cloth to sit or sleep on. Loving it. Thanks again for all the suggestions. Big improvement for me.
    6984459E-5BEF-4B1E-B172-B7B2F79A43D2.jpeg
  7. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    You can drop the weight of the pack cloth to almost nothing by switching to window insulation film such as https://www.duckbrand.com/products/weatherization/window-insulation-kits/62-in-x-126-in-3pk or https://www.gossamergear.com/collec...t-footprint-ground-cloths?rfsn=2106874.7c7a83 or https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company...r-Kit-Patio-Door/?N=5002385+3294348373&rt=rud
    The stuff is really strong and durable, though not as tough as pack cloth it's more waterproof, and a ground cloth sized piece weighs about 2-3 oz. I've been using the same piece of patio slider door indoor window film for about four years and it still has no holes or tears. Just use scissors to cut it to the size you want.

    https://sectionhiker.com/gossamer-gear-polycryo-ground-cloths-review/

    [​IMG]
    RJAMT likes this.
  8. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Are you still carrying a cook pot on your adventure bike? Well, leave that heavy metal hardware at home and do all your cookin' in a 9 gram crotch pot.
    tomo8r likes this.
  9. Joe Motocross

    Joe Motocross Adjustafork.com - CEO

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    Fucking @Sparrowhawk your killing me. You know I gotta check out that window film. Not sure on the crotch pot. Tyvek sheet works ok and is lighter than pack cloth but not as durable.

    The thing is with some of the light weight shit, it just isn’t durable and sometimes you need a little something that can take a beating. Fine line as we know.
  10. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    Tyvek is good stuff. It's loud and krinkly until you put it in the washing machine and drier. Super tough to tear, lightweight and waterproof.

    It's expensive to buy, but a 12 pack to a few guys hanging the stuff on a new house construction for a piece of scrap might even give you enough to give shelter to a small gypsy family.

    Remember-the writing faces the weather.
    Northern_Rider777 likes this.
  11. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    I believe USPS flat mailing envelopes are Tyvek. I use them to wrap spare tubes in my saddle bags. I have never seen one wear through, or even show any ware.
  12. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    I remember reading that John Muir did most all of his hiking with just a wool coat, Buck knife and a bottle of whisky...
  13. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    Having been inspired by you, I'm using a casualty blanket. I think they're 12 oz or thereabouts. Inside is my pad, aquaquest 10x7 tarp, and whatever else I want to put in there.

    Whatever else = klymit x pillow, klymit static v quilted sheet, and sea to summit *gasp* air chair (I know, completely unnecessary and directly inversely correlated to my manliness).
  14. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Durability is always a good thing but not the only thing. Like Janus9 said it's all about priority and goal. Durability is also closely related to the care one gives during use.

    If having heirloom quality equipment is a priority (I can get that way sometimes with shop tools) then durability is a high priority.

    If enjoying the ride is a priority then durability is only a consideration along with others like size, weight, cost, and consequences of equipment failure. Shelter failure in bad weather can be miserable to life threatening. Failure of a $5 ground cloth or sit cloth during a ride is not very significant. Deal with it, toss it, and replace it when you get home.
  15. todd83-900t

    todd83-900t Been here awhile

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    Great idea. I have a small 1.5'.x1.5' square of Tyvek wrapped around the tire levels. It's my portable "workbench" and helps keep the small parts from running away and the sand/dirt from entering the axle. It's nice to have in the sand.
    Zubb likes this.
  16. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    It's ofter the little things. GREAT idea!
  17. Snake Oiler

    Snake Oiler If the world didn't suck, we would all fall off

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    I can't stop laughing. That's hilarious.
  18. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    gap streety.PNG

    Here's my street triple r packed for 9 days of camping a few years ago. I had a 20 litre bag and my yoga mat on the rear seat. Everything else is my clothes,food and camping stuff.
  19. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    yukon busa.JPG

    Compared to this several years ago on my way to Alaska. JFC. I was carrying steel tarp poles fcs. 55 litre topbox! I think the stuff sitting on the very top is my laundry drying as I rode.

    I had good quality gear then but it was still fairly heavy and bulky. I thi k of what I brought on that trip and I shudder....but....it was a hellava good time. So much uneeded stuff though. My first long trip.
  20. oldgrizz

    oldgrizz Long timer Supporter

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    I am enjoying reading all these posts.
    I really look up to you guys that can and do shred all that weight off of your gear..
    In my case at 67 years old I 6ft tin and 280 lbs I don't fold up like I did years ago.
    Sleeping under a tarp just doesn't cut it any more.
    I did a lot of that when I was in Search and Rescue as we did courses of 24 hour survival with no sleeping bags and minimum gear.
    I now need a tent with more room but still light weight and I need a good sleeping pad.
    I will keep watching this thread for ideas that an old fart with a creaky body can use to reduce the weight of gear.
    Snake Oiler and Joe Motocross like this.