The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    For me, the ultimate luxury:
    Aquaquest Guide Tarp 9x7 (15 oz)
    Casualty Blanket (13 oz)
    Thermarest Ultralight Cot Large (3 lbs 15 oz)
    Hammock Gear Top Quilt (1 lb)
    Klymit Static V insulated (20 oz)
    Klymit quilted sheet (9 oz)
    Klymit X pillow (2 oz)
    Some Zing it cordage to hang the tarp (?)

    That's under 9 lbs for a very luxurious sleep system.
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  2. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    It doesn't matter how old, what size, how wealthy or other constraints. Just remember and practice:

    Packing light is a mindset.

    Take the minimum needed to achieve your goal/priorities, then take the lightest of each item on that list of what to take.

    Go over everything, weigh everything, leave no stone unturned.
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  3. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    Love the challenge of UL camping and really enjoyed reading this thread.

    I thought I had a flat lay picture for this setup but I can't find one on my phone and won't be home for a couple of weeks.
    I'll try to remember the contents. Haven't weighed it yet but really should.

    1998 DR350, Kick only with battery delete and a fair bit done to lighten the bike.
    Mosko Reckless 10 with a Sea To Summit dry bag strapped on top.

    Top dry bag
    - Tier Gear Goshawk Hammock
    - Tier Gear 3x3 silpoly tarp & Hootchi Cord (Thin nylon cord)
    - Wilderness logics Summer Series UQ
    - Wilderness Logics Summer Series TQ
    - Tier Gear down pillow (With a pocket sewn in the back to stuff clothes for more loft)

    5L Side Bag1
    - TomShoo (Cheapo Ebay) 750ml Ti pot.
    - 450ml Snowpeak Ti Mug
    - Small Esbit stove with Esbit cubes packed inside
    - Nescafe 2in1 Coffee sachets, mini bic, matches, Ti spork (All stuffed into the mug which is packed into the pot with a cleaning cloth)
    - Various foods like oats, salami, tuna sachets, dehydrated meals (Enough for 2 days)
    - Sawyer Squeeze Micro, 2L bag and 500ml bag. (Water bottle pop top caps fitted so I can back-flush without the syringe)

    5L Side bag 2
    - Skivvy roll (spare merino T-shirt and underwear rolled up into a pair of Merino socks)
    - Cheapo folding sit pad
    - Small first aid kit & snake bandage kit
    - Head torch
    - USB power bank and cords
    - Little hygiene kit with toothbrush, toothpaste, mini mouthwash, floss, S2S Wilderness wash, baby wipes, toilet paper and a tiny microfibre towel.

    I also wear a hydration pack when riding this bike which has a 2L bladder in it, a couple of muesli bars and my Garmin Inreach Mini.

    If I was unable to hammock camp then I could swap the UQ and Hammock for a bivy bag and sleeping mat for approximately equal weight and bulk.

    Tools are strategically packed onto the bike so that they are still there even with the luggage off. The stock tool tube has spanners, allen keys etc. Pico tank bag has a spare front tube, patch kit and leatherman crunch. Zip ties and hand pump are zip tied to the frame behind the left side panel. Tyre levers are bolted to the passenger peg mount on the LHS and the axle spanner and 3rd lever can be seen on the RHS of the swing arm. Buddy tow strap is zip tied to the stop triple.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  4. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Just curious, it doesn't look like you have much need for cold or wet weather clothes/jackets, etc.? Those items are a must and make up a good portion of the extra bulk and weight up in my part of the world. Heavy rains, hail storms, and freezing conditions at night can be a part of most Cascade and Rocky mountain adventures even in the middle of summer.
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  5. SFC_Ren

    SFC_Ren Been here awhile

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    No excuse for extra bulk and/or weight because you need to be warm or dry. My Marmot Quasar Down jacket weighs 10.3 ounces and packs to the size of a softball, my Marmot PreCip Rain Jacket weighs in a 10.1 ounces and packs smaller than the down jacket and my PreCip pants are 8.3 ounces. As has already been said in this thread in regards to sleeping bags, down quilts, tents and other stuff. Technical ultra-lightweight hiking and backpacking gear will cost more than a Walmart rain suit and may not be as durable when dragged behind your motorcycle but it will save space and weight. That's how I managed to pack for a three week camping off the bike trip of the Oregon, Washington and Idaho BDR's on a 250cc motorcycle.


  6. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    I am in Queensland Australia, My riding gear is KLIM Goretex stuff and it is both my riding gear and rain gear. If I am riding into a big storm then I would stop and put up the tarp. A 3x3 is a boat load of room to get dry under and can be setup in lots of different configurations. You're right though, In the colder months and in desert areas warm layers are essential. A thin set of Merino thermal underwear and a Merino pull over are generally all I would need and they would easily fit in the spare space in the side bags.

    If I lived further south I would need to rethink my setup a little but even in winter in most QLD locations I wouldn't need to change anything.

    This is my light setup but I have a DR650 as well which is setup for longer multi week trips and has ALOT more packing space and is more able to deal with below -5c temperatures.
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  7. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Call me paranoid but I don't trust that any rain gear will totally prevent some trickle of water from getting inside and wetting a down jacket. Even though some can be a little heavier and may not pack as small, I'll carry a synthetic insulated jacket for warmth. I also find that synthetics are a little warmer while riding because they don't compress under a riding jacket or wind pressure. Just me. If you look around you can find synthetics for about the same weight (and unfortunately price) as down. Such as https://nunatakusa.com/skaha-ultral...-pullover_style_hooded_jacket_with_no_pockets
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  8. SFC_Ren

    SFC_Ren Been here awhile

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    Huh? The gear I mentioned in my prior post is for when off the bike at camp. My riding gear is waterproof and insulated and has nothing to do with what I pack on the motorcycle. Your original post that I replied to was talking about packing light when riding in the mountains of Washington, "up in my part of the world" I don't consider my riding gear part of packing because it is on me. If my riding gear was part of "Packing light" I guess I would be wearing a speedo and flip flops because my Sidi Crossfire 2's weigh about 11 lbs by themselves. Your implication of "Bulk and Weight" was that it was packed on the bike. If you are wearing your "bulk and weight" I don't consider that packed, it's worn.

  9. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Sorry for any confusion. Everybody rides in different conditions.

    I'll give an example of the UBDR in late May which I did a few years ago. Daytime temperatures in the southern desert sections, Lockhart Valley, and S of Wellington and were in the mid 90F range and some sections were somewhat difficult riding with bike eating sand and silt and rock ledges. Riding and digging out a bike wearing a waterproof and insulated jacket would be unbearably hot so most riders would carry that gear on the bike. At the same time there was still snow and colder temperatures in the mountains west of Montecello and the La Sals and it was cold and wet over Lookout Pass on the ride home which required insulation and waterproof gear. When riding in such variable conditions, sometimes you wear the gear and sometimes it's packed on the bike. At least that's how I end up doing it.

    Depending on the destination when riding in Eastern Washington a rider may transverse or ride in the desert with temperatures at 90-100+F. Then, a few hours later you are crossing a mountain pass where it's in the 50s and misting rain. I've never found riding gear to wear all the time that's suitable for both conditions.

    Edit: Here is the riding gear that I use for extended trips where the weather could anything from hot and dry to near freezing and wet. Except for the armor and mesh jacket & pants everything is for on and off the bike.

    Upper body:
    Base layer synthetic t-shirt
    Forcefield Pro Jacket armor
    Light pile jacket
    Synthetic insulation puffy jacket
    Mesh outer abrasion jacket without armor
    Lightweight XXL bicycling E-Vent rain jacket fits over everything
    Electric jacket (Venture Heat 3.5 A, lightest I could find) only when it's going to be consistently cold

    Lower body:
    Light synthetic long Johns
    Leatt knee braces
    KLIM in the boot Mojave mesh pants
    socks and boots
    E-Vent bicycling rain pants over the mesh

    When riding in hot weather the insulation layers and rain gear are packed on the bike.
  10. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    The payoff for packing light:

    [​IMG]

    Camped on the crest of a mountain, on sloped terrain, riding a bit of single track to get there. Too steep to even deploy a kickstand.
  11. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    I ordered one of those Chinese made Silnylon 3F UL 1P tents on eBay yesterday.
    Needs a trekking pole to set it up but a telescopic camera mono pole makes a good stand in and is usually lighter.

    about 850g for the tent I believe. I'll check it on my scales when it arrives.
    It's double wall, not free standing but reviews say build quality is good and it cost $158AUD delivered which is about $108 USD.

    [​IMG]
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  12. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    2-man?? 1-man?

    looks good, regardless - like you could get yourself and some gear inside with a little vestibule space.
  13. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    The problem with a lot of tents, including every one I've ever owned is the pole length when collapsed is too long. They don't easily fit anywhere because of this.

    I'd consider a Weanas replacement pole. You can make it whatever length you like and the section lengths are only 13.5 inches for the shortest.

    I don't have these, but I've looked into them for an Alps Lynx 1.
  14. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    It's a 1 man tent unless you fit bunk beds. Vestibule space looks ample. Most reviews say don't bother if you are over 6' as the netting will be contacting your head and feet once you add a sleeping pad. I'm 5'10" so should be ok.

    I do agree, but this is a trekking pole tent. There are no tent poles. The packed length of the thing you use to set it up is governed by what you choose to use.
    Hell you could string up a taut line between two trees and forgo the pole completely. I'll be using a carbon fibre telescopic camera monopole which I have stripped of the foam handle, wrist strap and threaded camera mount. I then shortened it by one telescopic section and still have plenty of height. I use it for tarp camping sometimes and it doubles as a walking staff if I am on foot. Weighs around 250g and compresses down to around 350mm. Those Weanas style poles don't work for a tent like this as it needs a rigid upright not something that tensions the tent out in an arc.

    I own a Lynx 1 by Alps Mountaineering. It's pretty compact and I use it when I'm on my DR650 but at almost 2kg it is a heavy tent for what you get. Offset this with the price and it is totally sensible but if you want a freestanding (well semi freestanding) 1 man tent then the Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL1 is where it is at. 936g including poles, pegs, stuff sack etc. Less than half the weight. They make a "platinum" version that shaves another 100g off and a Carbon version which is lighter still!

    https://www.bigagnes.com/Fly-Creek-HV-UL1-Person
    https://www.bigagnes.com/Fly-Creek-HV-1-Platinum
    https://www.bigagnes.com/Fly-Creek-HV-1-Carbon
  15. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    https://www.bigagnes.com/Gear/Tents/Bikepacking
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  16. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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  17. MoseFitch

    MoseFitch Chicken Rancher Supporter

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    Couple of sites where you can buy your own.

    https://tentpoletechnologies.com/
    https://www.questoutfitters.com/tent_poles.htm

    I've bought pieces and cut them down so my packed size is 1 foot
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  18. AwDang

    AwDang Long timer

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    My concern with the Big Agnes $tuff is durability. I have close to 100 nights in my Lynx1 with no issues.
  19. jwwr

    jwwr Adventurer Supporter

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  20. King Rat

    King Rat Been here awhile

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    Secret foodstuffs that will take little room and provide plenty of sustenance:
    dates - the arabs cross the desert for days on a couple of handfuls of dates.
    flapjacks - perfect endurance food. Oats give slow release energy, butter provides fat and the syrup provides an immediate sugar hit. Flavour with chopped dates for the best of both worlds! Other dried fruit can be used, sultanas or raisins are good. You can eat a flapjack as you ride, one mouthful will give you enough energy to go another 50 miles. I eat flapjacks on the move so as to cover big distances without having to ride fast - fuel goes further, fewer fuel stops, progress is faster!