The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Good thought, food often weighs a lot and can take up a lot of space. Some of my favorite durable foods with lots of energy packed in a small space are assorted nuts, tortillas, the little snack-sized Snickers bars, stolen foil-packaged condiments from fast food restaurants, jerky, hard salami, high-temperature cheeses (they don't get all oily in hot weather) such as feta, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and queso fresco, peanut butter, butter, honey, etc. I use the Colgan's squeeze tubes for things like peanut butter, butter, and honey. Dinner and sometimes breakfast items are bought during the last fuel stop of the day.
  2. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    +1 on the dates - lightweight and will make the morning committee meeting start on time.

    How do you prepare the flapjacks while keeping weight/pack size at a minimum?
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  3. King Rat

    King Rat Been here awhile

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    They are what they are, you can make them thin and small, but then they crumble and you end up with a bag of dry porridge! Basically, flapjacks are just baked porridge. If you cut them into portions, you can pack portions in freezer bags and stow them in nooks and crannies to fill space. Porridge oats and Coffeemate are a good breakfast that take little room too, but you need water and a sourse to cook - chopped dates are a way of flavouring the mess. I take an MSR Dragonfly stove, I don't like fires and many places over here they are forbidden anyway - we don't have the wilderness that you do overseas in the colonies. For instance, in Scotland, offroading is illegal and any gravel tracks across the hills are privately owned and it is access roads for the estates. You can walk anywhere (right to roam), but ride your bike offroad and it stands a chance of being confiscated. The gamekeepers are out on the estate and they know the ground so can easily catch you. They can confiscate your bike and gear and hand it over to the police. You then have to make arrangements to come and collect it at a time and date set by the police - and if you have ridden 500 miles to get there it is very inconvenient to have to walk out again!

    Here in England, and in Wales, there are places you can wild camp, but they are few and far between and again, it is private ground. If it isn't in private ownership it is owned by 'The Crown Estate'. There are places where a blind eye is turned, but it is a privilige to camp there, not a right and like in Scotland where they have had trouble from people leaving a mess, they have stopped ANY overnight camping other than in designated campsites, and there are patrols of rangers to enforce the law, admittedly they concentrate on the known popular areas. So it is possible to wild camp and people not object, provided you are responsible and, as I have little doubt about folks on here, LEAVE NO TRACE. Owners don't mind responsible stop overs, it is the vandalism and liter and mess left by those who don't care they, quite understandably, do not like and are not going to tolerate.

    Anyway, back to the packing issue. I detest gas cylinder stoves. They are great for boiling water, but that is it. The Dragonfly uses the same fuel as th ebike, so I don't need to carry specific fuel. It has good control for cooking, from a gentle simmer through to a rolling boil. The solid base allows the use of a blast match to light it, so no Zippo or matches required. If you are going to light a proper fire, on the beach for instance, then the blast match is properly capable of that - a 35mm film tub with cotton wool impregnated with vaseline provides very compact fire starters, sufficient for a month of fires!

    Water is the biggest issue for packing and carrying. If you have a water source, great, if not you have to carry it, which is both bulky and heavy. I can supply dehydrated to water to anyone that needs it for really lightweight packing........
  4. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    There are a hell of a lot of through hikers using BA tents for months straight without durability issues. Personally I have never owned one but I would really like a fly creek hv ul2.
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  5. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    For food, Cous cous with some dehydrated vegetables, spices and beef jerky mixed together makes a great dinner that just needs hot water. Add a tortilla if you want.

    For breakfast I like quick oats (the finely chopped stuff) with dried fruit, almond slivers and a little bit of vanilla protein powder mixed together. Easy to package in zip lock portions.

    Lunch would usually be salami sticks and or bars of some description.
  6. Cro59

    Cro59 Been here awhile

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    Lentils with veggies (I dehydrate mine), jerky, garlic and spices. Filling and nutritious. Add dried kale if you are a Millennial.
  7. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

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    Currently have a project underway to build a set of custom panniers for a WR250R. Using TYVEK, probably 2 layers laminated together. Going to build them to contain an exact set of things for each side [ example LH will hold selected Tarp/quilt/sleep mat/cooking gear ]. Hopefully designed to match the various lumps and bumps on the motorcycle exactly, so they wont be symmetrical , simple roll top with Velcro, glue and sewn, aiming for about 1-1.2 kilos for the whole thing.

    If it works and is not too clunky looking I'll post a pic
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  8. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    ^^^^ now this could be interesting. :lurk
  9. radmann10

    radmann10 Derf Supporter

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    Water is always an issue in the desert SW, and must be carried along, so I try to make the food I take as light weight as possible, ie...Knorr or Uncle Bens dehydrated side dishes for dinners, lunch is a snack at the mid-day fuel stop and hot chocolate and instant oat meal for breakfast.
  10. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    I actually have the opposite approach for areas without water. I prefer to carry heavy "wet" food. Because the additional water weight needed to hydrate dehydrated stuff is heavier than the offset.
    In areas where water is abundant dehydrated food is king.
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  11. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    I'll take a baker's dozen!

    I don't like to cook anything other than water when riding. I generally pack 2 freeze-dried meals (I have switched to Wise from Mountain House), and some sort of jerky, almond, dried fruit and candy type of trail mix. Crackers, cheese, and vacuum-sealed fish make great lunchtime meals. Most of the places I travel afford the opportunity for some sort of restaurant when I need gas and the freeze-dried meals may remain uneaten by the end of the ride.

    Water is the heaviest thing I carry. I consistently go through 6L per day, filling my 3L bladder twice, and often drink 2-3 glasses of water when I stop at restaurants.
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  12. King Rat

    King Rat Been here awhile

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    Pay pal OK? Friends and Family please..... 13 litres, or 13 gallons would you like? :photog
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  13. malcom

    malcom Adventurer Supporter

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    I don't know if it has mentioned in this thread. I used to carry several changes of outer clothes. However I cut way back on these buy carrying 6L dry bag put in dirty clothes water and soap agitate and rinse dry on line or back of bike.
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  14. malcom

    malcom Adventurer Supporter

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    I 've read that some guys throw socks and underwear away and buy new packs at wally world.
  15. AdvNener

    AdvNener Been here awhile

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    I do that too
  16. malcom

    malcom Adventurer Supporter

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    Oh BTW I saw some company ad 8oz can's of dehydrated water. When ready to use just add your own water.Why didn't I think of that.
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  17. King Rat

    King Rat Been here awhile

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    See post #623... :D
  18. portabill

    portabill Adventurer

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    You need to mix it with heavy water or it will be too thin.
  19. Snake Oiler

    Snake Oiler If the world didn't suck, we would all fall off

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    Weight Watchers?
  20. Twin headlight Ernie

    Twin headlight Ernie Custom fabricated dual sport accessories

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    My go to sleeping bag setup is a 0 degree mummy bag and a 40 degree rectangle bag. When it gets real cold I put the mummy bag inside the rectangle bag.
    I just got back from a trip with 60 degree temp swings and used both bags apart and together.
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