The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    Is that notch on the lower left corner the drain hole?

    I liked the filter holder from Ortlieb. The drain hole is very small, keeping the hot water on the grounds for longer and making a stronger cup. Still helps to put in a healthy scoop of grounds.

    [​IMG]
  2. ncrambler

    ncrambler Been here awhile Supporter

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    Have one in my tool kit, it has proven invaluable.
  3. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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    I have used and abused my ATG one since 2010 the reusable filter slows the flow enough to get a good brew and I only switched to this solution because people I would travel with did not like my proper coffee filter
    I grew up on one of these environmentally friendly you can fix it when it breaks in my pre-teen years we used to buy the flower in bags and my mom made these once a year after my dad would make the ring to fit over the coffee pot
    Now they have given a fancy name called a Thai coffee filter, but hands up who grew up with these filters before paper filters became all the rage.
    proper cofffee.jpg
  4. sasho

    sasho Dual Personality

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    Turns out I am getting this for my big 5-0, woohoo!!
    :clap:freaky:ricky:super
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  5. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    Here's my KTM out on the Lolo Motorway packed for multi day or multi week backcountry trips good for any weather with temperatures in the high 40s F or above. The total weight of the gear and luggage without food is 25 pounds and includes tent, sleeping bag, chair, tools and spares, cook kit, clothes, etc.

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  6. philthyphil

    philthyphil Nomad

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    Nicely done sparrowhawk! I'd be interested to know how you had those side drybags mounted and what make they are. I think I see a rack under them now I look closer.
  7. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    There's a Globetrottin rack. The dry bags are 20 liter SealLine Discovery Deck bags. They're strapped on with two 32" XL Voile straps and a regular camlock nylon strap. The top bag is held on with Rok straps as they offer more adjustability.

    The system is more solid in rough terrain and more versatile than a GL Coyote I used to have.
  8. kneeslider

    kneeslider Insufficient privileges!

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    I've always found having your staff pack the motorhome & meeting you at appointed rendezvous works best!
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  9. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    Let's rendezvous at the Fence line trail on the Tour of Idaho. On the first day of the 1,750+ mile route suitable for dual sport riders packing light.
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  10. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    [QUOTE="***********] At 66 and 64, we'd die if we camped out .....[/QUOTE]

    This man below is 64. Many will say inspirational. I say, it should just be the standard. It hurts my soul to hear such otherwise vibrant people:
    A. Have this attitude that age defines our abilities.
    and/or
    B. Allow one's self to decay unnecessarily quickly.

    I certainly understand that our bodies wear over time, injuries take longer to recover from as we age, etc. but we all have the ability to work towards delaying that as long as possible if we choose. I can't count the number of threads where people post this type of comment above. I also can't count the number of older people here that just keep on keeping on. I wish there were more of the latter.

    I saw a previous post pondering how many people could simply lose 10 pounds to pack lighter. I think the answer is disheartening.

    Ride On.

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  11. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    64? Just a youngun. Not even eligible for social security or medicare. When I was about 30 I used to ski with Karl. He was an old fucker, late 50s and he could out ski and out drink me. I wanted to be like Karl. Now Karl is in his late 80s and still skiing but I can keep up.

    My my, hey hey, some say it's better to burn out than fade away. I say bull shit. It's better to stay fit, work at keeping sharp, and look forward to adventure even if it's uncomfortable at times. Carpe vitae!

    Father time takes his toll but you don't have to give it up without a fight.
  12. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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  13. PNWet

    PNWet Long timer

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    I must not have seen that post, but I will add:

    I sleep better in my hammock camping than I do in my own bed at home.

    And for this thread, a quality hammock can be part of a light, low bulk camping system. My 'indefinite' setup is <50L. That's everything on the bike except me. If I left the chair (REI Macro) and used my smallest cook kit (a small gas set up instead of the Trangia 27) I'd be down to <40L.
  14. worncog

    worncog YBNormal Supporter

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    Get fit, stay fit, do cool shit faster.
  15. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

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    I think that injuries play a major role in whether or not someone is even able to be in good physical shape, let alone have the mental fortitude to do so. As a 46 year old with damage to my spine, arthritis in my left hip and left wrist (from multiple breaks), Carpal tunnel in my right hand , ACL and meniscus damage in one knee and currently rehabbing an MCL tear in the other as well as two severely worn out rotator cuffs and a jacked up left elbow joint, I can tell you first hand that trying to stay in reasonable shape is a constant battle. Having lived a life filled with years of skateboarding, inline skating, road cycling, mountain biking (both XC racing and Freeriding), BMX racing, riding/racing enduro and fighting MMA, my body is trashed and I feel blessed just to get out of bed under my own power. I can completely understand why some people simply give up. Try not to judge them too harshly.
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  16. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I think that most of those who give up, were never really trying to begin with. I'm a decade older than you and nowhere near as beat up (although not for lack of trying) but I've certainly acquired a few aches and pains along the way. I mostly just slow down a bit and grit my teeth occasionally. Don't do much to keep fit but I'm no couch potato either. Did a couple of pretty serious high altitude treks last year. Lost 20 pounds this year and feel a lot better for it. Taking care of your body is always a good move, even if it's just limiting the extra helpings and watching alcohol intake - or other simple stuff like that.
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  17. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

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    Possibly but I try to give them the benefit of the doubt. The pain that I manage on a daily basis , many would find debilitating. I choose to keep going because I'm either strong willed or an idiot or both. :lol3 I don't expect others to do the same because we all have different thresholds.



    Man, I hear you on that and congrats on the trekking. I have been forced to slow it down quite a bit over the last 5 years or so , but I'm trying to get back into shape now that I have rehabbed the injuries that had forced me to stop my shenanigans all together. I've lost 16 pounds this year and my cardio is finally becoming reasonable again. I'm back at the skate park and skating street (after 14 years of not skating) and hoping to hit some handrails again before the year is over. Never thought I'd be able to do that again! Ignoring the calls from the fridge to have a midnight bowl of ice-cream certainly hasn't hurt that process. the weight loss has made all of my bikes faster as a bonus! :D
  18. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Very true, and easy forgot by those more fortunate.
    A couple of injuries on top of a lifetime of hard physical work can be a serious setback. 3 years ago I was doing my daily 16 mile commute on a bicycle, and would think nothing of a 100+ mile day ride. Now it's a challenge to do 12 miles on the local bike trail. Ones physical condition can deteriorate quickly, and without warning. Speaking from experience, pride comes before the fall.
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  19. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Exactly, I'm 38 military aircraft mechanic, rock climber, outdoors freak, etc. I have compressed disks in neck getting injections doc says surgery I said not yet, have had knee surgery, multiple shoulder surgeries, and the big one last Nov had 3 of my vertebrae fused I look like the Terminator on x-rays. Guess what since Nov I have done a complete 180, quit eating like shit, got back in the gym as back allows. I went from busting buttons on a 38 pant to wearing a 32 or 30 depending on brand and have 6 pack abs. Every time I go for a follow-up with the spinal surgeon he's blown away saying I'm some sort of miracle patient all his other patients are hobbling around trying to get more pain killers and I'm slamming weights in the gym jogging a few miles a day. The day after surgery I was asking doc to do extra laps around the hospital even though it hurt like a mother I knew the faster I got moving the better I'd be.

    The blunt reality is I'm not a miracle I just want it bad enough and they don't.
  20. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

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    The thing is that I just can't see people like us being anything but the exception rather than the rule. That's why guys like the one pictured above are an inspiration rather than a physical standard. Good on you for keeping at it.


    @NicKel78 Who is he by the way?
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