The art of packing light

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    This is good discussion here. I certainly understand everyone’s’ point. @Ginger Beard, I hope things continue recovering for you and it’s great to see you taking an active approach to that.

    You taking an active approach just reinforces my statement. It’s that while we can’t control everything and time and injuries take it’s toll, giving up is not the way to go about it as you yourself are showing.

    There is also a big difference in cutting back or doing things differently because of an injury vs. rolling over based on age. The age thing is stated over and over here in the forums and I’m sure we can all think of an example from our personal lives of hearing that in just the past week.

    The man I reference above is Dr. Karl Goldkamp. I would encourage everyone to look him up and read his story. By medical accounts he should be dead. But as @Madman4049 referenced, he wanted it (life) bad enough. Just goes to show we may never be where we were, but there is always room to fight for more than where we are.
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  2. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

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    Lol, I had a buddy recently tell me that I need to grow up and chill out (referring to my renewed interest in skating). I can certainly understand where you are coming from, I just try not to be too hard on folks for seeing the world and life differently than I do. Thanks for the encouragement. If you want to watch me regain some of my old skills, I'm on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theoriginalgingerbeardman/ . I decided to start an account of the process in order to hold myself accountable. It's a fundamental part of me trying to pack as light as possible. :lol3


    Oh, meant to mention that if it weren't for taking the time to stretch and do a little Yoga from time to time, there's no way I'd be back to doing any of this! Definitely going to check our Dr Goldkamp! :freaky
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  3. philthyphil

    philthyphil Nomad

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    Good discussion and I agree with most of what's been discussed. But this thread has been hijacked and wasted a page for someone in the future actually looking for information related to the thread title.

    To get this thread back on track, although inspiring, the gentleman pictured is obviously wearing hair dye, at his age. This is unnecessary weight required to ride a motorbike, therefore, FAIL.

    Back to our regularly scheduled programming.
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  4. GHanson

    GHanson Been here awhile

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    Motivation is everything...
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  5. PNWet

    PNWet Long timer

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    I do something very similar, with only some slight variations. Nice work!
  6. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Yup most people just don't want it bad enough, like you said you have to ignore those midnight fridge runs and actually dedicate time, sweat, and pain to become this. If I'm hungry protein, eggs, chicken, or tuna are my staple and water is the only drink in the house aside from powerade zero and a bourbon every now and then. Good on you too man it's a daily effort especially when you're already injured. I know my motivation though, I can do more now than I could at 20 and even covered in scars and almost 40 I got girls in their 20's literally throwing themselves at me and eye fuc$($% me at the pool coming into my orbit. Life is a more painful than I'd imagined but it's really really good. And it's really cool to run 4 miles straight and not be out of breath unable to talk. I shoulda got injured sooner ;)

    To get back to packing light has anyone had experience with xero shoes sandals?
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  7. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    Yes, and not overly happy. I really love how minimal they are but once the straps and Velcro get wet, they don’t hold worth a darn.

    For the weight and size my pick is the Lems Primal 2 sneakers. Barely weigh more than the sandles and smash down pretty good. Definitely smaller and lighter than Chacos, by far.
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  8. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Bummer but good to know, thanks I'll look into those.
  9. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    The Xero I have are the Z-Trail. I am not sure it matters though as it's not the actual shoe part I have an issue with but the straps and velcro securing the straps and I would assume that part to be all the same across the different models with that attachment system. They are listed at 5.4oz for a men's size 9. The Lems Primal 2 is listed at 7.4oz for a men's size 10. For 4oz per pair difference I really like the extra around the foot part when out in new territory. I like having the little bit of extra stubbed toe protection and they can double for in town or cooler weather footwear if needed. The sole on the Lems is very light and flexible with great toe box width. I have also had much better durability out of the Lems than my woman has had out of the Xero sneakers. Xero just isn't built for the long haul in our experience.

    Now for even more minimal, check out the Xero Genesis @ 4.6oz men's size 9 and super flat. For lightweight travel they probably do just fine. No velcro, you just have to be ok with a strap between you toes which I cannot handle.

    https://xeroshoes.com/shop/gender/mens/ztrail-men/
    https://www.lemsshoes.com/products/mens-primal-2?variant=23307304730682
    https://xeroshoes.com/shop/genesis/genesis-men/
  10. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    I used Tilos sand socks as camp shoes recently. 3 oz. or 90 grams. Assuming our camp sites would be forest floor dirt turned out to be wrong. One site was an abandoned logging camp with excavated rocks and debris. Were the sand socks ideal? No but they did take the edge off and pack down to about the size of an orange.

    Life is a compromise.
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  11. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Perfect thank you, I'm leaning towards the Lems now, I really like a sandal because I can use it around camp and as a shower shoe at parks. Compared to the Teva's I usually pack all of these options are considerably lighter and smaller. I don't like thong type sandals they're uncomfortable.
  12. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    If my feet are sore, I'm miserable. I also like to do the odd bit of hiking while on a riding trip. Super light, flimsy, footwear is never going to be worth saving a few ounces. I take a pair of decent, lightweight walking shoes.

    ...But then I'm on a 1290SA so while I don't load it down with excessively heavy or unnecessary crap, I'm never going to notice a pound or two here and there.
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  13. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    I think it's what you're used to, I hiked miles on a trail last summer in sandals. Everyone I passed said I was nuts but there I was flying past them anyway lol.
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  14. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    That would be fine for me too until I stub a toe or twist an ankle. I've hiked in Tevas many times but I still prefer walking shoes if I'm on a bike trip - especially after suffering with plantar fascitis for several years. Not a problem now but I'm still careful not to bruise my heels by walking on hard surfaces without sufficiently well-padded shoes.

    Still, if your choice of footwear is ok for whatever off-bike activities you are doing, then it works for you.
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  15. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP . Supporter

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    Try a good trailrunner if you want more than a sandal, and don't want a lot of ankle support. Reasonably light, fairly compact, very durable & comfortable. I don't hike in boots unless I have a specific need for what they offer.

    For showers or walking around camp, I use cheapo flip-flops. Low weight, compact, very cheap, dry quickly, and easy to replace when the time comes. I suppose they could also function as a kneeling surface while working on a bike.
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  16. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Yah I backpack in Salomon trail runners. Taking my less is more approach to the bike too. Last year I had riding boots, trail runners, and cheap dollar store sandals. I want to cut it to one light minimal shoe or sandal and the obvious riding boots.

    Went from 3 massive hard cases to a top case and Giant Loop Great Basin. Now trying to get down to just the Great Basin for short trips.
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  17. greasyfatman

    greasyfatman Long timer

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    What bags are they?
  18. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    20 liter SealLine Discovery Deck Bags held to the rack with a couple of 32" XL Voile straps and a 6' NRS Tie-Down strap. Total cost was under $200 US for 60 liters of waterproof soft luggage. The top bag is an older version of the dry bag that I've used with a few patches for over fifteen years. It's held on with a couple of ROK straps that are handy because they expand if I want to temporarily strap on a gasbag, water bladder, or a six pack.

    I used to use a 40 liter GL Coyote along with the 20 liter dry bag but the rack on my KTM is too wide for the Coyote to fit so had to come up with a new system. The three dry bags strapped directly to the rack carry the weight lower and are more stable than the Coyote was with the additional bag on the back.

    [​IMG]
  19. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

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    book mark pg 29
  20. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    If I don't expect to hike, sandals. If it's a short hike, toigh it out with my riding boots. If I expect a serious hike, take for-real boots, and if 'travelling light' becomes 'travelling slightly less light', that still beats 'not travelling because of a trashed ankle'.
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