The art of packing ultralight

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by smackyface, Oct 8, 2021.

  1. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    I'm thinking more about luggage, and the convenience vs. stability question, and thinking maybe it has become a moot point as I reduce the amount of crap I carry. I realized that I really don't access my luggage regularly anymore, except to add/remove layers throughout the day. That part is kind of a pain with the soft rack and dry bags approach, which means I'm less likely to stop when I should to adjust my layering.

    Anyone have any easy, fast, secure solutions for this? I can just use kayak or voile straps to lash my rain shell and heated gear to the rear rack, but I'm always worried they'll snag a branch on a tighter trail or get blown off at freeway speeds.
  2. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    Put a 10l drybag in your pocket. Use it as needed.
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  3. Cheshire

    Cheshire Been here awhile

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    @smackyface I really like the smallest (24"?) Rok straps for securing my daypack to the back of my seat. I used them on Friday for a 600 mile ride of mostly interstate to interstate-during-insanity-hour speeds (65-90mph). Backpack contained set of layers, rain suit, water bottles, & essential riding bits: bungee net, side stand plate, earplugs, etc. Nothing moved.

    edit because I forgot: I always pick backpacks with external pockets: front, top, open/elastic bottle pockets on at least one side. I try to arrange the straps so the ones I want easy access to don't require taking the whole thing off.
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  4. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    I saved over 200g today by going from a Wera Zyklop 1/4" ratchet set to a 7" T-handle in a cordura pouch. Using the T handle meant I could ditch my 3" extension and the smaller 4" T-handle I used for high-torque stuff.

    IMG_3516.jpeg

    The best part is that I already owned the T handle, and I sewed the pouch and 3D printed the bit holder, so the only cost was the $7 socket rail from Home Depot. I cut it short, drilled a small hole, and ran a zip tie through it to stop the sockets from sliding off. I'm as excited about space saved as I am about weight:

    IMG_3517.jpeg

    This has me rethinking how I pack my entire toolkit. Small combo wrenches aren't likely to wear through a tool roll, so I could move all of those to their own ripstop roll. That would only leave a few longer items, which wouldn't need an entire full-sized tool roll all to themselves. By moving into smaller rolls/bags I can take advantage of smaller storage spaces around the bike, like the fender bag, and free up space in the saddle bags.

    I need to play around, but I think I'm getting closer to fitting everything into two 10L dry bags. If I sleep in my clothing, I can probably get away without my down liner down below 40F, and maybe even down below freezing. Thinking I'll go out for an overnight this weekend and experiment.
  5. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    What kind of jacket do you have? Several ADV-oriented jackets have a dump pouch on the lower back large enough to accommodate rain gear. I LOVE this feature on my Klim. I never have to dig for my rain gear or worry about it getting other stuff dirty/wet. Plus it sits low enough on the jacket that it doesn't "hang" off me, resting instead on the seat itself -- thus not adding any weight/drag on an already heavy jacket (it's not heavy enough for me to notice it when I ride standing up).

    might be a way for you to incorporate a similar solution to an existing jacket if yours doesn't have this feature?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  6. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Neat. I'm wearing a custom Motoport that doesn't have that pocket, unfortunately, and their liner is pretty bulky. This got me thinking though - I wear a backpack it would probably fit in now that I've emptied a bunch of other useless cruft out of it. I'll have to try that out.
  7. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Neat toolkit. I’m in doubt on the knipex in my toolkit, it’s the heaviest tool in pack. Have not used it for myself, only to fix stuff for other people.

    I haven’t worn a jacket in over a year now. Only miss the pockets really. But this was all with good(ish) weather, none of the real winter stuff.
  8. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    I've spent a lot of time recently thinking about carrying tools on the off chance someone else will need them. I've never used the recovery gear in my Jeep for myself, but I've pulled people out a few times, and other people have pulled me out a few times, and that makes me lean toward being prepared to help. But I also don't carry extra food or water on the off chance someone would need them. I'll absolutely help in emergency situations with first aid, or would share anything I'm carrying, or use my beacon for someone who was truly screwed. I'd absolutely ride back to civilization for someone who needed a hand and was out of options. I don't think I'm going to carry extra tools around all the time just in case though.
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  9. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    New custom tool roll! 75g lighter than my old one from dirt-bike-gear.com, but more importantly, it's a lot smaller. I'm working on a set of crash bar bags and hoping to reduce bulk to the point where I can get rid of my tail bag. I'm on a mission to move all the weight I carry as close to the footpegs as possible.

    IMG_3518.jpeg

    IMG_3520.jpeg
  10. miks

    miks Been here awhile

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    I respect the weight savings. I’m still packing my Wera Zyklop because it’s just so very well made and super functional. However, I did ditch the bulky Wera bag amd bit holder, and then pared down the bits to only those I needed for my bike. I put the bits and sockets in a small ZPacks dyneema pouch and the wrench goes in a different pouch with my stubby wrenches.
  11. richo360

    richo360 Long timer

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    Interesting topic. Sometimes, lightweight and going without is impractical.

    I did a 8000km/5000m trip a few years back on the 690, and was pleased I got all my gear weight incl pannier bags down to 21kgs . Sleeping swag and exped/bag, all food, tools, and minimum 6 litres of water.
    Fine if youre going 2 hours between supplies, but theres plenty of places here in Australia you'll do a full day , 800kms with NOWHERE to resupply.

    That said, I once rode with an ex military guy who was a freak when it came to weight savings. His toothbrush was cut down and had holes drilled in the handle, no joke. He would probably eat cooked roadkill than carry food :lol3

    Freeze dried food is a no brainer for weight savings. Strip your tools down to a minimum. A lot of weight savings can be made in things like bivvy rolls, sleeping bags, even being prepared to take shorts/Tshirt/sandals rather than jeans and jumpers. Nnderwear....lol. take all your old holey ones with the elastic gone, turf them every few days, or send them home in a mail bag to your current or ex wife, depending on your sense of humour.
  12. PilbaraGoat

    PilbaraGoat Been here awhile

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    This is what the thread is for - great work!
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  13. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Yeah, it’s an awesome piece of kit and it was tough to let it go. I’ve managed to blow one up before, which made me stop completely trusting it on its own, and once I was carrying a backup the whole idea kind of stopped making sense. They really are a delight to use though.
  14. Brmax

    Brmax Been here awhile

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    Looks good, and certainly less bulk.
  15. andrewgore

    andrewgore Gôremā

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    278# setup (pallet scale verified)
    Bike without handguards\signals\GPS\bags with full tank of gas weighed in at 248#, so this is pretty close to 25# for tent, sleeping gear, clothes, tools, spares, and cooking supplies. Big Agnes inflatable mattress pad, some 40° sleeping bag, kelty 2 man tent, spare tube, enduro fanny pack with all my tools. Number plate pack had a solar battery thing for charging stuff. I could cut this down quite a bit by ditching the tube and just packing some patch kit. I'd gladly sacrifice 3-5# for a rack if it kept the luggage LOCKED to the bike. But that's me. :thumb

    That said the luggage setup was a total disaster on the trail. Hit any whoops\g-outs\singletrack and the luggage was flopping in the breeze. I also realized I despise anything that restricts my movement on the bike seat (duffle bag). I don't understand how folks ride with things locking them into a tiny cockpit on the seat. But that's another discussion.
    [​IMG]
  16. Brmax

    Brmax Been here awhile

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    Great write up and in sharing your setup!
    I being old, totally support your thoughts on a rack, yet it could easily be double the weight in my opinion, it would be an infrastructural investment. :-)
  17. DSquared

    DSquared Dilly Dilly! Supporter

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    One of these says we'll have to meet up and you can see how slick the Green Chile stuff is.
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  18. andrewgore

    andrewgore Gôremā

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    That'd be great. I've looked at the green chile stuff after I sold the wolfman luggage. However now I'm at the point where if I'm bringing any form of luggage......I'll end up as the opposite this thread:
    [​IMG]

    :lol3 That setup there with nothing in the boxes weighs just a little less than me + the loaded 350.
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  19. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Yep, was gonna say - soft racks and dry bags are the most solid and secure system I’ve found. Highly recommend the Green Chile stuff.
  20. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Saving a few grams in your toolkit: look for the right sockets. They’re not created equal.

    A while back I was weighing my toolkit and found that sockets from different brands, but identical sizes and design, had weight differences up to 40%.

    The bigger the socket the bigger the difference.

    I found that sockets of the brand Bahco are lightest. But of course this is from the sockets I had myself or could find weight info on online. And I like that Bahco makes decent stuff and has not yet failed me ever.

    Did the same with spanners, and found that the classic 2v BMW kit did really well. Same or even better than the Asahi lightools (not the stubs). But I finally found spanners of KS Tools that gave me right size combinations at the same weight as Asahi for a very low price. Now I only need 1 or 2 spanners, while with Asahi combo’s I needed 2 or 3.
    KS number to find the series: 517.1411