The art of packing ultralight

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by smackyface, Oct 8, 2021.

  1. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    How do you like the OR Helium? Seems like it has the potential to be the best bang for the buck ultralight shelter. What do you do with your gear while you sleep? Is condensation a problem?
  2. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    You're right about the tent. That looks like your cheapest avenue to save the most weight. What replacement are you considering?

    You may also be able to shave some respectable weight off of the NatureHike. Replace guy lines with lighter cord, change to lighter stakes, ditch a ground cloth or replace it with a lighter material, remove zipper pulls, etc.
  3. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I see you have a two-person tent now. Have you slept in a bivy sack?
  4. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Nope, never have but I’m super interested. I almost always travel solo and just stop to sleep when I’m tired, so the fast setup and light weight are really appealing. I just can’t figure out the logistics of keeping fire ants, scorpions, and rain out of my boots at night.

    Ditching the ground cloth is a great idea. Gonna do that. It’s bulky and doesn’t offer much benefit.
  5. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    If you decide a bivy sack will work for you, finding a lightweight bag for your boots won't be too hard. The trick will be keeping it ventilated so the boots can dry out. If you have some overhead cover to keep rain out, a tightly woven mesh bag might work.

    Lots of bivy sack options out there. I've only tried an old one, and didn't care for it. If bugs are a concern, I'd rather have more room with a tarp & mesh nest, or a lightweight oversized 1p tent.
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  6. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Holy crap my ground sheet weighs half a pound! Ditching that dropped my overall shelter weight to 1860g / 4.1 pounds.

    I also ditched my larger fixed-blade knife. I’ve been carrying it as a survival tool for really bad conditions, like building a fire in the snow. That doesn’t make a ton of sense if I’m carrying my whole shelter / sleep system though. If I got stranded I’d just make camp.

    Aaaand I finally ditched my shameful, shameful rechargeable sleeping pad inflator. It makes me happy but it’s 100g I can live without. I already carry a pump sack as a backup.

    All this brings my total to 24.69 pounds! Of course that doesn’t include rain gear…
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  7. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    lol - Yeah, that's a win right there.

    If you want a footprint, this works well.
    https://www.amazon.com/3M-Indoor-Patio-Insulator-1-Patio/dp/B0000CBJ80

    upload_2021-10-21_23-3-16.png
  8. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

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    I'm a bivy sac user. I had a couple over the years but switched to tents for the last several years. The latest is the REI Quarter Dome SL2 which is roomy for one and weighs around 2 1/2 lbs. But it's bulky to pack and in wind, you have to tie out a bunch of guy lines to keep it up. One big advantage of a bivy sack is it's more wind proof than any of the light weight tent/tarp things I've tried. As an experiment, I tried just sleeping in my moto gear in a bivy sac (1 lb) - that was in the mountains and I'd guess the temps dropped into the 30's. I was fine but it wasn't a comfortable night. I wore out the old bivys and have purchased the Outdoor Research Alpine bivy which has a hoop and a bug screen. Those should help with condensation and keepy creepy crawlies outside. For camping on sand like in Baja, I add a piece of tyvek maybe 5' X 7' (unknown weight but probably say 8 oz) which helps keep most of the sand out of the bivy and also makes a handy quickly deployed sun shade. For luggage, I'm using the Mosko Moto Reckless 40 or 80 and I put my boots upside down in the bag holsters that stay on the bike. Helmet in the tank/handlebar area. In fair weather, I hang jacket and pants on the moto. In crummy weather in small tents, I've put the pants and jacket on the floor of the tent and put insulating pad/sleeping bag on top of those. I haven't tried that in the bivy. Yet.
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  9. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Here some interesting stuff: https://therollinghobo.com/2019/06/under-10-kg-enduro-expedition-gear.html


    And just weight everything. Leaving stuff out is bullshit. Clothes, first aid, spares, tools, just add everything. And if it turns out no one is able to do a long term trip in lesser conditions that base weight of 25# should be changed.

    So I propose to count everything, except what is worn on the body.

    In my case additional insolation layers are in the base weight list, as they’re packed most of the time (hopefully).
  10. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    Does the hoop on the OR Alpine break down to a small packable size?
  11. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Hard to recommend -- the hoop for your head isn't free-standing, so unless you have a convenient way to anchor it so that it stays erect you won't have any head room at all, which is uncomfortable.

    There is no where to store your gear -- mine would sit under the picnic table (if available) or I'd cover it with my raincoat. If I was going to use a bivvy, I would take advantage of its incredibly small size/low weight to pack an additional small group cloth or tarp to create a rail fly and put the gear under there.

    I imagine for semi-arid and arid environments it would work fine -- but it won't hold up in any kind of rain without additional protection.
  12. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    But you agree that food and water are excluded, correct? I only carry water on my back, and I only carry food for maybe 1-2 hours per day of my ride. You could make an argument for water, but there's no way I would consider food as part of my loadout.
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  13. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator Super Supporter

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    I have been chasing the gram dragon for a few years now. Stuff I have learned:

    - Backpackers invented this wheel long ago. I have spent a lot of time researching what they have done, especially through-hikers
    - Dyneema (Cuben Fiber) is worth every penny I have spent on it
    - If I add a bolt-on item to the bike, I make sure the fasteners do not require an extra tool. American after-market suppliers often include imperial fasteners, which I replace with metric in a size that matches the stock fasteners/tools
    - Most of my heaviest items are items that never get used, or at least I hope to never use them - tools, tubes
    - The Thermarest Z-pad is one of my most frequently used items
    - However many Voile straps I think I may need - buy twice as many when ordering them - they find their way into all kinds of non-moto projects
    - Moto plastic can be replaced - go ahead and drill/melt/cut into it
    - As explained in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - bring a small (microfiber) towel
    - Cotton has no place in the outdoors
    - A subway sandwich that has spent the last 3 hours bouncing around on the back of my bike still tastes better than a freeze-dried backpacking meal
    - IMO, most "survival" gear is a game of diminishing returns. That is to say, it is more likely to cause, rather than solve, a problem. Number of times I have needed to bushcraft a shelter - zero. Number of times I have almost cut my thumb off with a knife, hatchet or saw???? Now, all the sudden, that tourniquet in my IFAK is essential
    - An important/costly piece of gear will get melted on the exhaust
    - I have enjoyed camping/traveling more, not less, after chasing the gram dragon

    10 days solo, self-support (with gas stations), on the CO and UT BDR. I actually was alone in this campground, so I took a shower with my camel back. Because I was 2000 miles from home and solo, I brought some "just in case" items that never got used - bivy bag, airpad, and rain suit (because it was already packed and I forgot to remove it when I decided to ride with my 3-season jacket/pants instead of my desert garb. Thus, I was about 7 lbs heavier than usual.

    [​IMG]

    This is my ruck when I am traveling close to home in the summer - very easy to keep it at 20 lbs with luggage, but not including consumables.

    [​IMG]
  14. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    What, no Titanium or Aluminum? :D
  15. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Agreed on the consumables, they change every day.

    Titanium, aluminium, hdpe, all proper stuff :)
  16. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    Thanks, that's what I was afraid of. Looks like I'm back to shopping for ultralight 2 man tents at 3x the price...
  17. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Just received a nice package containing a sea to summit big river 13l drybag (128 grams) and an Ortlieb 4 liter waterbag (130 grams).

    These will replace the MoskoMoto Stinger 22 (800 grams), a molle bottle holder (90 grams) and a pet 1,5 liter bottle (40 grams).

    Saving 672 grams while increasing water carrying capacity if needed to 4 liters on the bike.
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  18. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    https://durstongear.com/tents

    I have the 1p and 2p versions. I think they strike a good balance between weight, price, space, protection, and quality. If you want to push more in the UL direction, the upcoming Pro model looks promising, but the cost will increase.
  19. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    problem is where do you put the damn trekking pole... have you found any that actually fold down to a reasonable size?
  20. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Can’t you make a collapsible trekking pole?

    I know you can order tentpole parts.