The art of packing ultralight

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by smackyface, Oct 8, 2021.

  1. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod I want to do right, but not right now Supporter

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    I wonder if they're concerned with the weight of a Reckless 80. I was really close to pulling the trigger on one of those until I realized they weigh almost as much as hard luggage.
  2. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I have an older version of these that collapse to 24". I haven't tried carrying them with my Mosko Moto luggage, but I think they'll work.
    https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/product/alpine-carbon-cork/

    There's some discussion about non-trekking pole options on the Drop page.
    https://drop.com/buy/drop-dan-durston-x-mid-1p-tent

    Poles from here should work fine.
    http://rutalocura.com/?page_id=5904/

    Another option. Instead of an adjuster, a rock could be used to shim the pole, if needed.
    https://zpacks.com/products/48-carbon-fiber-tent-pole
  3. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    All the trekking poles I know of do collapse. Some are aluminum, some CF, but all are 3 or 4 sections long. Think about how long the pole needs to be to fit human ergonomics and divide that by 3.
  4. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I bought the R80 set so I'd be able to carry my backpack in one holster without having to break it down (Zpacks Arc Haul). It's a heavier soft system, but from what I've seen, hard luggage plus the requisite rack system weighs considerably more.

    The R40 bags are sized better in some ways, and I may eventually buy a set, since they can be used with the same underpinnings as the R80.
  5. Sunaj

    Sunaj Been here awhile

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    Did not know that, never used one. Perhaps a replacement with tentpoles allows for a pole of four shorter parts.
  6. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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  7. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    There are some UL fixed length poles, and some that break down with shock cord connecting the sections, rather than telescoping.

    For a shelter designed for use with trekking poles, some method is usually desired to adjust the pole length to account for variations in terrain, and/or sagging material.
  8. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Size is the biggest concern... I hate my 17" tent poles... love the bikepacking poles that collapse down to 8.5" a 24" trekking pole is a non-starter for me -- where on earth would you strap that?

    i'll look at some of the non-standard options you fellas linked... I do question how well the trekking-pole tents stand up to windy/rainy conditions? def. like the size/weight and relatively reasonable price
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  9. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    Tent builders need to understand this. 8” x 12 is easier to pack than 6 x 18
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  10. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    Generally speaking, fewer sections make stronger, lighter, cheaper to produce poles.

    Tent designers utilizing trekking poles are also designing for people that use trekking poles, so a longer packed length is immaterial to them. They usually aren't selling poles.
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  11. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    I’ve read a lot of really positive reviews, especially in regards to performance vs price. Seems like availability is really limited though, which is a bummer.
  12. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah, it's a batch system, and under 'rona rules, relatively small orders like those probably get shoved aside for major manufacturers.
  13. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator Super Supporter

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    Assuming you just need a pole to support your tent, not a real trekking pole, I have been using these when I need to take a tent: https://zpacks.com/products/48-carbon-fiber-tent-pole

    They fold up to a length of about 11 inches (28 cm).

    Or you could just bushcraft your own, but then you need a hatchet, jungle knife, and tourniquet.
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  14. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator Super Supporter

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    Of course I have a collection of exotic metals - I store them in the form of pins and plates secured to my bones; hardly notice the weight at all.
  15. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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  16. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    Thats a tiny sleeping space if you average sized or roll around.
  17. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Yup... the R80 is 16lbs empty.

    I'm sure their stuff is very rugged, but my impression is that it's seriously over-engineered... The R40s have these ultra heavy-duty pouches to carry the included dry bags. Beyond adding unnecessary protection, they further limit your ability to stuff the dry bags and/or use bigger dry bags. On top of that the system is replete with extra layers of padding and stitching and little attachment points. Which results in the R40 clocking in at about 11 lbs empty (36L total). The Wolfman B-base + 3x medium rolies (2 side, 1 tail) comes in at 7.2 lbs for the identical 36L
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  18. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    It's definitely a 1 person, but I'm not sure I'd call it tiny ... it's pretty similar to the Big Agnes Fly Creek bikepacking, and presumably other sub-3lb 1P tents.
  19. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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  20. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    No weight advantage, but Hilleberg's are much more robustly built and very easy to setup. My riding buddy has the Fly Creek 2 -- I love how light and compact it packs, no question about that -- but it's a real fussy little thing to setup and overall doesn't inspire confidence in terms of sturdiness.
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