The Australian Metal Detectorist thread

Discussion in 'Australia' started by sidetrack one, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Bobk0

    Bobk0 MacGyver Minded.

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,122
    Location:
    Around that over there.
    True that :topes
    AUSSIEADV likes this.
  2. Bobk0

    Bobk0 MacGyver Minded.

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,122
    Location:
    Around that over there.
    So guys, as when it comes to metallurgy, has anyone considered electrolysis? I have done this on a few very old iron pieces with pretty amazing results. Caution: though, the water and the gasses given off can be toxic. Do not do this in your kitchen....

    What is involved?
    Let's go further into that if interest. There are hazards.
    20190907_223034.jpg

    The end result though is a once-custy artifact becoming an 1800's recognizable piece of history.

    20190908_123759.jpg
    Suncoaster likes this.
  3. Suncoaster

    Suncoaster Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,277
    Location:
    Where the girls are green and the grass is pretty.
    Can you explain the basics ?
    What are you using as an anode ? Are you using soda etc ?
  4. Bobk0

    Bobk0 MacGyver Minded.

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,122
    Location:
    Around that over there.
    Yes Sir, so the power we are talking about here is direct current (D/C) which is much more dangerous at high current or (A) amps. It might work in A/C? I do not know. I am using basic baking soda as the electrolyte, in heavy quantities.

    The Anode (+) is the positive portion of a direct current (D/C). In my case I used a piece of 2"x2" regular angle steel about 6" long. This is not the best conductor, however... this is important because there is not an element of heavy metal included in the composition of this steel. Iron and carbon. Using something like stainless steel or lead brings a higher conductive anode.. but will break down in this dissolution into heavy elements. This is not good as chromium and other things bad to cells are present.

    The anode will pull the impurities away from the cathode. In my case this is something I can hang into the dissolution from the cathode. (the artifact).

    Let me back up too about electrolysis. What we are doing here with D/C is the breaking down of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Or in this process better known as HHO gasses. While these molecules dissipate back into water..for a moment, HHO is extremely explosive. Not to cause alarm because HHO does not build up into clouds of neighborhood-leveling proportions, however it is something to be aware of when turning water into HHO. In this process. If messing around with electrolysis, dont smoke...shit might explode.

    So anyhow, the cautionary tale in electrolysis, is...The anode should be simple steel, the cathode (-) should be your artifact, and the surface of your water and the gasses given off should be treated as toxic.

    Last note: this experiment was done on 3 Amperes, many ppl might recommend battery chargers..those can be way higher power and kill you in wet areas
    ... be careful.
    nevgriff64 and Suncoaster like this.
  5. Suncoaster

    Suncoaster Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,277
    Location:
    Where the girls are green and the grass is pretty.
    12V 3A ?
    How long did it take ?
    Bobk0 likes this.
  6. Bobk0

    Bobk0 MacGyver Minded.

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,122
    Location:
    Around that over there.
    So being an experiment I think it took about 4 hours, with changing the water about 4 times. The 3A current was supplied by an old external hard drive power supply. When I started to see the bubbling action subside, I changed the water and added new electrolyte. Here is a comparison:
    Stir19.jpg
    I have only done this on one other piece so far, this was a very obscure piece of American history:

    fogg.jpg

    I had no clue what this was when I dug it....it looked like a piece of lead, but when I cleaned it and then "electrocuted" it, what I found was that it was a piece of very very obscure American history. This is a part of an "exhaust whistle" which was made in the early 1900's for the Ford Model T. The best I can tell this is a flap made of bronze which closed on the whistle part of the "Signal horn" much like a boat or ship. Before automobiles had actual electric or air horns....this was part of the device which attached to the tail pipe of model T. The exhaust gasses would blow through the whistle with a foot pedal actuation....making the car whistle.... It was the early car horn....I have yet to find the exact model... but this is the idea below: same company:

    Jericho.jpg

    Probably my favorite find so far...just because it was such a wtf is this thing. :D
    nevgriff64 and Suncoaster like this.
  7. bikeymikey70

    bikeymikey70 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Temora, Australia
    Need that electrolysis for my rabbit trap...

    A few more finds at the local goldenfields, an interesting site, lots of old broken bottles and crockery, and heaps of rubbish, so hopefully some interesting finds amongst it all

    IMG_1704.jpg
    nevgriff64, DARK-SIDE, Bobk0 and 2 others like this.
  8. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV 2wo left foots

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,878
    Location:
    Ned and Wild’s fight site
    molasses and water.
    Suncoaster and bikeymikey70 like this.
  9. bikeymikey70

    bikeymikey70 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Temora, Australia
    Cheers, vinegar worked really well on my old spoon

    IMG_1705.jpg