The bike I want doesn't exist

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Drop_Center, Jun 22, 2019.

  1. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    In my book, if you're talking about a DL1000, you have ridden a "really high quality bike"; you just don't realize it. I owned two consecutive DL1000s, a 2003 and a 2007. That's a great engine in a decent handling, practical, distance bike. Loved 'em. I dare say the newer restyled V-Strom 1000s are even better.

    Yes, I eventually replaced the V-Strom with my fits-me-like-a-glove KTM 990 SMT (SuperMoto Travel); a more compact and more elegantly "just motorcycle" motorcycle. But that doesn't change the fact that I still consider a V-Strom 1000 a "really high quality bike."

    JET
    #61
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  2. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    Bah. We all do that to some extent. Always imagining and looking for better is what fuels innovation and advancement. It just has to be moderated with practicality.

    In my case, the bike "I want but they don't build" would be the one that does everything my current three bikes do:
    • Is as off-road capable and weighs the same (158 lb) as the Trials bike.
    • Is as street legal and street nimble as the 500 EXC.
    • Is as long distance road worthy and comfortable as the 990 SMT.
    But even that's not enough. It also has to:
    • Be electric.
    • Be real-time solar powered so there is no downtime for recharging, and thereby has unlimited range.
    • Be completely under my own control, except when it instantly and automatically engages its built-in Iron Man repulsor rays to perfectly protect me and it from any damage whatsoever.
    • Have a heated seat.
    Since that's not likely to happen in my lifetime, I currently have the three mentioned bikes, and continue to ameliorate my wishes with practical prudence, just as I've always had to do anyway, whether owning one bike or several.

    Having the current three still doesn't preclude my hopping onto one of them in a few minutes to make my customary Saturday visit to my favorite dealership. Today's visit is kind of special because there's a chance I may get a short test ride one of the just-arrived KTM 790s; the first bike to come along that halfway makes me consider the possibility of replacing the SMT. But whether the resulting urge is compelling enough or not, I'll still go home content with what I've got.

    'Cause, after all, it really does just boil down to making our own prudent decisions, and still enjoying whatever bike(s) we have within their appropriate applications. For example, oddly enough in spite of having the three, there's another that has been "haunting" and "taunting" me lately: The new 125 Honda Super Cub, of all things.

    Such is having the "motorcycle bug." It's--as Monk is prone to say, "a blessing...and a curse." The only cure for the "curse" part is to just accept it, and enjoy it, too. ;-)

    JET
    #62
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  3. PARDAL1970

    PARDAL1970 Going somewhere...

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    I can’t believe it but I did it again. Ok, it for a good cause (I didn’t adapt to the MT07) and I began to think the only way I could stabilize was to buy outside the box. I started to investigate all of the possible solutions and found exactly what I hope will be it: I tested and really enjoyed a Moto Guzzi. So now (onde again) the MT07 (sold with 1000kms) has became a Moto Guzzi v7 iii stone . I made a promise to my wife this is it! Ps: they should have rehab for compulsive bikers.
    #63
  4. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    The bike I want now is Triumph Speed Twin with ABS and tubeless spoked wheels from Scrambler 1200 XE. Shouldn't be too hard, one would think...
    #64
  5. schmik

    schmik Been here awhile

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    Like others I couldn’t find perfect with just one bike. So now I have 3.

    Swm rs300r
    Dr650
    Husky 401 svartpilen

    They all have a use and all get ridden regularly.

    The 401 is a daily ride. Zips between traffic and still has a heap of power after 130kph on the highway sections. Takes me to and from work and all over town.

    Dr650 gets the long dual sport rides and the trips away. It’s farkled very nicely and is actually a pretty good dirt bike that is also happy at 130kph for long stretches. If I am doing 10hr day at 350km of mostly dirt the I just roll out of the shed on the 650.

    Then there is the swm. She goes on the back of my 4wd and gets taken to the bush. Pure dirt for her. Often does 100 to 150km over 8 hours. Sometimes less on tough tracks.

    The trick is to know what you like to ride and buy bikes accordingly. I love riding dirt. I love tough touring on dirt and also riding tough tracks until exhaustion! I have that covered.

    The husky is a necessity for getting through traffic fast.

    I don’t have a big fast comfy rd tourer. I have little desire to do long rd tours. And I have very little desire to punt a 250kg on dirt roads.

    No one bike is enough!
    #65
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  6. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    Egads! You goofed up there.

    You'll be quoted on that from now on. ;-)

    JET
    #66
  7. AdventureTrail

    AdventureTrail Wannabe Adventurer and YouTuber

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    Agreed. 2014 Strom here, and I love the bike.



    I still lust after a 1200GS or 1250GSA though, which is where I'll eventually wind up.
    #67
  8. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I'm a cheapskate, so I try to solve the issues the cheapest way possible. For instance, my bike has a very short range. 75% of the time, that isn't a big deal. My solution for the other 25% was to buy a small tool bag and a couple of MSR fuel bottles. If I think I'll be riding somewhere the gas station spacing is too long, I attach that little kit. Now I have a solution to an occasional problem that only cost me $20 and I can stop obsessing about it.
    #68
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  9. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Get hold of the liner from a coffee box (like a wine box liner but double-walled with some sort of insulation in-between). It's sufficiently fuel resistant for temporary use and can be rolled up and tucked away when you don't need it.

    I took two with me to Alaska. Never needed them myself (My big KTM proved it could easily manage 250+ miles between fuel stops, even on gravel roads) but I loaned them out to someone with an R100GS "just in case". He proceeded to blaze right past the Yukon River Bridge fuel stop and needed the extra fuel 50 miles down the road.
    #69
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  10. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I wouldn't have guessed a food grade bag would be fuel resistant. Good tip!

    Giant Loop makes fuel bags too, but are of course more expensive.
    #70
  11. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I wouldn't keep a coffee bag for years once used for fuel and expect it to still be ok (it might be) but I didn't see any sign of deterioration over a few days of repeated use. The guy I donated them to refilled them a couple of times. He would ride 40 or 50 miles and dump the first one in his tank, then ride another 40 or so and dump the second one in, so he was minimizing the miles spent with a flimsy, flexible bag of flammable liquid strapped to the bike.

    If you don't mind the slight odor of stale coffee, free is most definitely the best price!
    #71
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  12. schmik

    schmik Been here awhile

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    Not free but works well: desert fox fuel bladders.

    They come in 3.5L and 6L.

    I use a 3.5L on the swm rs300r . I usually put 2L in it and stuff it in a back pack. As soon as I have done 40km I transfer it the fuel tank.

    This covers me for the entire day. Range is then 160km. On tough tracks that is enough... takes all day.

    It’s rated for fuel and being under filled it’s unlikely to burst.

    Unfortunately the only after market tank for that bike is 19L, expensive and requires husky plastics. 10L is what I need. The bladder was $90.

    There is no perfect bike. Why can’t this bike come with a 10L tank?
    #72
  13. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    DR650 is about as close as you're gonna get. Drag it through the Procycle salad bar, with a focus on lithium, aluminum, and titanium mods to shave some weight. Adapt an electric motor to the chassis and you're golden.
    #73
  14. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    Been there, done that. Don't miss it.

    JET
    #74
  15. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    Just imagine how tough it'd be if the bike you wanted for years was one many others want, while the manufacturer drags it's corporate feet, releasing a three-wheel abomination that sits in showrooms like it's glued to the floor. Looking at you, Yamaha and the T7 and Niken.
    #75
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  16. mr72

    mr72 Been here awhile

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    I am beginning to think this is little different than anything else in my life: cars, guitars, friends, bicycles, motorcycles, you name it. There's no such thing as perfect, and even if we could get what we think is perfect, we wouldn't like it. Human beings are inspired by imperfection. You just have to find that imperfect thing that inspires you. You need something with things you love about it so much that you overlook the things that are not right.
    #76
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  17. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    No, I'm pretty dang sure I'd like it.

    I very much like my Honda-Montesa Trials bike, and that's not for its one niggling imperfection: If it had an electric starter, it would be perfect. And I'd like it even more.

    JET
    #77
  18. Toddv

    Toddv Been here awhile

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    Love my Tracer 900 GT probably more than any other bike I've owned as an all around fun and reliable bike and there's been a few. Now just waiting to ride a 790 Adventure R...
    #78
  19. jfauerba

    jfauerba Been here awhile

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    Still don't understand why mfg can't put belt drives on more lower power street bikes, 300cc-900cc, like the z400. I understand the need for chains on high power bikes to squeeze all the power out and lower the weight. Also the need for chains if taking it on gravel roads.
    Would also like cruise control on more mid size bike like 600-900cc.
    #79
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  20. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Now with more sarcasm

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    Bikes (pretty much all of them) are amazingly good now.
    #80