The CRF1000L Africa Twin problem thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by twinrider, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Drum Dog

    Drum Dog Been here awhile

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    It will go together but the rotor rubs against the pads. Mime did and is what made me realise something was wrong. This placed straighten me out and I made the correction in the book.
  2. DCTFAN

    DCTFAN VIN# JH2SD0451GK000002 '16 CRF1000LD

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    not backwards, the printed illustration has the "tophat" spacer going into the caliper side,
    instead of the correct sprocket side.
    .
  3. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    I found mine on the internets..then killed several trees at work printing it out!
  4. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    There was a story somewhere on another AT website that a guy put in backwards and got back home after taking her out for a spin and the brake rotor was cherry red.
  5. DCTFAN

    DCTFAN VIN# JH2SD0451GK000002 '16 CRF1000LD

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    The rear has a floating caliper (moves with the pistons)
    Even if you put the spacers in wrong, you are still able to turn the wheel.
    That's why people ride off with it and pay the price.
    But the report of cherry red rotor seems
    like a campfire story ; )
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  6. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    Prince, or the artist formerly known as Prince, (also RIP) wrote a song about the cherry red rotor. About a Corvette rotor though.
    roookie1 and DCTFAN like this.
  7. Wood1

    Wood1 Long timer Supporter

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    I thought that song was a euphemism for something else entirely.
  8. ameen

    ameen Adventurer

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    Sep 29, 2011
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    64
    I need some help figuring out why my 2017 AT is running like shit at altitude.

    Basically on passes over 4000 meters (13000 ft) the engine will stumble and run poorly. At first it seemed like it would only happen when cold but getting up to 5000 M it would have issues even hot.

    It stumbles and coughs almost as if it is running way too lean (opposite of what I would expect) and can’t rev above 5K rpm even in neutral.

    I am riding with a friend on a 2018 ATAS and he has no issues.


    Today it seemed fine climbing the mountain and started having issues only after I shut the bike off for a couple minutes. But this time instead of disappearing as it warmed up the problem continued until I got below 4000 meters.


    Any ideas?
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  9. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    crap...not from me no.
    How is the air filter? would a partially plugged filter not cause that..or make it worse at altitude?
    I know the filters are not sweethearts to get to, but might be an idea.
    Could it be a fuel issue? or fuel filter? if you're both filling at the same stations (likely) then that rules out fuel quality.

    But it's good under 4000m?
  10. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I'm thinking what Greg is.... How many miles on the bike?
  11. ameen

    ameen Adventurer

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    42k Kilometers on the bike and I cleaned the air filters and (even checked the valves) the problem persisted.

    Different gas and the same issue. Runs fine under 4000 M....makes me think it might might be something like dirty injectors either. It should need less fuel at altitude, right?

    Only other thing I’m thinking is a bad O2 sensor or some issue that is presenting itself only with the cold...I unfortunately can’t separate altitude and cold weather right now. Lower altitudes are warm and high are cold (close to freezing)
  12. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    What octane fuel do you use? Can you source an additive like seafoam?
  13. ameen

    ameen Adventurer

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    64
    Running 95, and have to see what additives I can find. In ritual south west China headed into Tibet and finding gas has been even a pain
    Amphib likes this.
  14. O'Hooligan

    O'Hooligan Ken Dodd's dads dogs dead

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    Seeking a little help here. I just sold my 07 R 1200 GS. I'm looking at buying a used either r1200gs lc or an Africa twin. I read somewhere that there areproblems with the AT forks is this a major problem or is it isolated. Any advice on potential problems I should be looking for on a used one?
    Thanks
    Gerry O
  15. mb300

    mb300 Been here awhile

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    2016 - 2017 forks are flexy, lose their plating, and get very frictiony to the point that they feel bound up. Very noticeable on pavement. In addition they are undersprung and poorly damped for anyone over 150-170#.

    2018 standard Africa Twin's have the same hardware, but with an improved plating. There have been a few reports of the new plating wearing off.

    2018 Africa Twin Adventure Sports (ATAS) have a thicker outer tube and improved plating. TBD if they will also fail, I'll let you know in 4000 more miles.


    As an owner of a 2016 AT with A TON of suspension work (including 2018 ATAS forks), I would recommend buying a ktm 1090 instead. Even with the new forks the front suspension is not particularly compliant on the street, nor is it adjustable enough to maintain decent support when offroad.

    If you aren't going to go offroad get a vstrom or super tenere or another GS.
    twinrider likes this.
  16. PhaseShifter

    PhaseShifter Been here awhile

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    I agree with mb300 !
  17. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I have put about 14,000 miles on my 2017 since new, purchased about a year ago. I am not experiencing any problems at all. I would absolutely purchase again. I've been riding for almost 30 years and this has been my favorite motorcycle to date. For me it does it all, I generally like Swiss army knife like things and this bike is exactly that. I'm in western north carolina and am surrounded by great riding, and have been ecstatic with my choice. I can't recommend it enough.... if it's scope is what you're looking for.
    DCTFAN and Veetwin like this.
  18. bbanker

    bbanker Been here awhile Supporter

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    +1 on what @Amphib says. 16K on my 2017 with stock suspension and no problems. I am #250 and 6'1. Touring, on and off road it does it all pretty well. I absolutely love the motor and the ergonomics. It does feel a little soft if I hammer it hard offroad, but if I slow down it's great. The traction control is a little too intrusive on level 3 (max) but it's great at level 1 or 2. I added Oxford heated grips, batzen adjustable windscreen brace, full altrider crash protection, Denali lights, SM Motech evo racks and panniers and still paid less that I would for a similarly kitted 1090. Plus I rode the 1090 for a while and it cooked my nuts waaaaay too much. KTM 790 and Yammy T7 both look great too.
    Wood1 and Amphib like this.
  19. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    Those two bikes (GS vs AT) are very different, to the extent that forks should not be the deciding factor. For the price difference you can get the AT and re-do the whole suspension.

    I've ridden the r1200gsa lc and there's no way I would take it beyond a (dry) gravel road. Too big, too heavy, too expensive to fix things, far too much power (motor spins up too fast and loses traction), even their suspension isn't that durable (blown seals and that tube separation issue). When the front shock blows you're looking at a $600 rebuild - not unlike getting ATAS uppers on the AT. My friend who had one for a couple seasons is selling to go back to a non-lc version. But for on-road use these bikes are excellent - responsive motor, stable chassis, sticky tire choices (19 front / 17 rear).

    Like typical Honda's, the AT is a solid bike with an achilles heal. Just like the VFRs were bulletproof except for the R/R, the AT is bulletproof with the exception of the fork wear.

    Someone mentioned a KTM 1090; I've heard many horror stories about reliability and parts availability, but perhaps that's not a KTM brand issue, but a bike-specific issue? Strong motors and nice suspension ... but at what cost? For the price difference, can one start with an AT and then get an outstanding suspension installed?

    I have about 16k on my 2016 and once in a blue moon, at a stop, I'll notice some stiction in the forks (I do run stronger springs). Otherwise no issues.
  20. cblais19

    cblais19 Long timer

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    I'll also note that the AT offers the DCT transmission, which is a unique thing and now that I have one has made my general purpose riding far more enjoyable (especially when I'm dealing with DMV area 95 or other highway traffic).