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The CRF1000L Africa Twin problem thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by twinrider, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. TequilaSqueela

    TequilaSqueela Been here awhile

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    May 8, 2018
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    It looks like they’re replacing my kill switch assembly under warranty and said the bike dying is due to a clutch switch that messes up the ecu in the throttle body and fixed it for no charge. It didn’t make sense to me, but they are very confident and said they flogged it after to test so I am hopeful.

    They couldn’t figure out the wheel bounce from the front end, but checked the tires, wheels, and bearings. At least I have peace of mind and might be overthinking it.

    I will say though- damn has that bike spoiled me. I’m on a loaner cruiser right now and don’t have my heated gear hookups, madstad windscreen or luggage.

    I have been so cold and wet the last few days. Back to my roots. I’ve been on this sissy nerd luxury bike for too long. I’ve gone soft.

    Good god, though. Being back on a cruiser is soooooo slow.
    Getnout and Junglejeff1 like this.
  2. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    The AT feels more nimble as it's about 30 kg lighter than the S10, but the S10 also has a low CoG and combined with the 19" front wheel it handles well enough that I am not any slower on it than I was on the AT in the twisties. It also has a balance and stability that the AT, at least my '16, lacked when loaded with luggage and/or a passenger. Where the AT has the advantage is on dirt if you are an aggressive rider and do more than easy dirt roads. People that ride a lot of dirt would probably prefer the AT. Those who do a lot of road touring solo or two up might prefer the S10.
    Ginger Beard and Getnout like this.
  3. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    I've found bikes with soft or under-dampened forks do this when there's more weight in the back. A stiff headwind or rough pavement can exacerbate that. Do you use a topcase and are your forks OEM?
  4. Quercus petraea

    Quercus petraea Been here awhile

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    Is it a DCT bike?
  5. Mercenary

    Mercenary Mindless Savage

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    If your AT only hits 110 down hill then there is something wrong with it. I've been above 200 KPH a few times on mine and its never been a problem...even with my fat ass on it.
  6. Olde Phart

    Olde Phart Olde Phart

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    Mar 3, 2018
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    Yeah, 126 mph @ 4500' ASL without panniers and 117 mph with panniers is what I get ...

    Good fast scenery to ya!
  7. Dave77459

    Dave77459 Been here awhile

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    My KLR had front end problems with too much sag in the back. If your rear end is too low, the geometry is wrong. I had a touch of the same on the AT, so I cranked up the rear and it went away. If you have front end issues, check your sag.
  8. William Wolfen

    William Wolfen DR Guy

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    I hit 120 on a slight uphill with a headwind. ~300' ASL.
  9. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    You guys ride these big bouncy girls fast! I hit 95 mph once and felt like it was a near death experience. The sales man that sold me mine also had an AT he was 60yo and said he hit 125 with his wife on back.
    Nihon Newbie likes this.
  10. William Wolfen

    William Wolfen DR Guy

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    Adjust the suspension. It'll still be soft, but it won't be bouncy.
  11. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    Today I was cruising back from the ride on the interstate and traffic was not light and was moving at 87mph. Lots of buffering dirty air. Glad I didn’t get a bike that was less road worthy. I’m totally comfortable with this thing up to 90ish.
    Muddler and bbanker like this.
  12. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

    Joined:
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    @twinrider well put. AT is definitely leans more towards the bumpier roads, whereas the the ST is better suited for the smoother stuff, longer distance.
    I couldn't do this on my Tenere...I'd be walking home with bits of oil pan.
    The AT can be ridden at speed over some really dodgy shit. That said, I had to smash out a 1000km day to get myself back home. It did it just fine.


    @TequilaSqueela lasquilla

    The AT feels a bit lighter than the ST. The bigger wheels and higher ground clearance makes the COG about the same as the tenere.
    Tenere has basic TC. AT on the fly TC is much improved.
    I did a write up a while back..
    https://thetenerist.wordpress.com/2...bye-bye-super-tenere-hello-honda-africa-twin/

    The OEM tenere (non ES) Just has an edge in stock suspension components. They are ok.
    I eventually revalved the front, and tossed out the oem shock for a yacugar.
    Ditched the tenere, after a happy 90k km, to gain ground clearance. AT fit the bill.

    AT suspension.
    Revalved and resprung front, OEM forks shat the bed prior to 10k km, replaced under warranty with 2018 tubes, eventually shelved, and on to 48mm ohlins
    Rear shock needs work. Didn't bother with it, and went with a Tractive shock.
    The OEM shock will not cope well with overloading, hence giving a light/twichy front end.
    Ginger Beard likes this.
  13. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    I've never had an issue with my S10's TC other than wishing it could be turned off OTF. My DCT AT's TC would kick in all the time if I goosed the throttle hard in first gear even on dry tarmac so I made it a habit to either turn it off when I started the bike, or at least dialed it down from the default setting.
  14. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    All bikes have issues.
    Used is not always the answer.
    Sure it takes care of initial depreciation, but it could be a new owner, getting rid of a bike that's giving them issues, that they can't solve.

    My 2017 bought new has given me grief over the forks. That is it.
    It's been properly pounded, and I will likely keep it till about 75k km or so, and move on to another ADV bike.
    I almost bought a 1090. The issue i would have had:
    -Possible dodgy air boxes
    -Front fairing supports breaking
    -some possibly dodgy electrics, including a fuel pump, or some reported tank issues

    What I wouldn't of have dealt with is a crappy OEM suspension, and a motor that delivers silly grins..but then had flip coin of:
    -zero wind protection on the highway
    -excessive heat off the twin
    -poorer fuel economy...go figure..

    My 2012 Tenere bought new, only had one major issue, kept till 90k.
    I rebuilt the motor at 80k km. Poor piston ring seal, and valve seals were culprits.
    I had a friend help me with the rebuild, as I never touched anything past the valves.

    Rear drive seal went, due to a swing arm plug that fell out. If I knew about it ahead of time, I'd have glued it in place, and not have the issue.
    I also dodged a bullet with the shit OEM cam chain tensioner.

    My headlight wiring melted well before the recall. Fixed it myself.

    What will I buy in the future?
    Not a honda. Kwak-a-saki doen't build an ADV bike. Suzuki is road only.
    Might go back to Yamaha, or buy something orange, or that chainsaw maker that starts with H and roll the dice.
    I will entertain 1 or 2 yr models with a few accessories thrown in, and discounted. Check the service history and cross my fingers.
    Trolling the classifieds, there's loads of ATs, 1090, that get bought, accessorized, and either sit, or the dreams don't become realities, and get moved on.
    That will be true of Yamaha T7, KTM 790Rs etc.
  15. TequilaSqueela

    TequilaSqueela Been here awhile

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    Yes and yes!
  16. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    the default setting on the AT is dumb. I've got the TC switch on mine, and it defaults to lowest TC setting. Good to go.
    On the tenere, having to stop and turn it off, was just dumb on a ADV bike.
  17. TequilaSqueela

    TequilaSqueela Been here awhile

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    Manual
  18. TequilaSqueela

    TequilaSqueela Been here awhile

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    I got my bike back. The shop couldn’t find a problem with the wheels so I’ll talk to my suspension guy. Doesn’t die now, but I still have weird throttle response. If I hammer it, the power seems to have “detents” on the way to redline. Haven’t seen it on anything else and feels like a mapping issue as it is consistent.

    Glad to have her back though- between the luggage, wind protection, heated gear, power, and nimble response im glad to be off that loaner naked cruiser with a backpack. It’s been in the lower 30s for my Highway commute and that sucked.

    I’ll take a look at sag, compare weights and no weights in the top box, and talk to my suspension guy and see what I can do.
  19. MillennialFalcon

    MillennialFalcon Improvement starts with self

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    Any reason you wouldn't consider moving to a 19" front rim? Woody's Wheel Works will gladly lace you up one and I have a feeling that would be the drop-in solution, albeit not the compromise desired by everyone, to our bouncing fork issues. That or entirely different forks or hey why not just an entirely re-designed bike. It will be interesting to see if the 2020+ model years have the same issue however minor the redesign. My bet is they will have the same issue.
  20. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Yeah, I don't get Yamaha's obsession with the idea that being able to change the TC on the fly is dangerous.