the DR200 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by klxrdr, May 13, 2007.

  1. steve gs

    steve gs Been here awhile

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    If you like everything less the seat call one of the many "seat" guys and have it reworked. They can do wonders. I'm only 5'7" and 150# so I don't have the seat react in the same way as you heavier riders do.

    For riding in a recreational trials mode I really liked the bike and even peg top seat dimension but not the large tank (the only circumstance where a big tank would be a negative) which gets in the way of the knees when standing on steep climbs. We all know the 200 is in no way a woods or trail blaster and I don't expect mine to be. It's a reasonable compromise that I can accept.
    #41
  2. no

    no way man no how

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    I had good luck with a thick sheepskin seat cover as mentioned by our aussie friend above. A sheepskin seat cover will make a bad seat okay and a good seat great.

    Surprisingly, my butt did okay on the 200 with the sheepskin on the seat from Minnesota to western North Dakota and back.
    #42
  3. no

    no way man no how

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    I've been running K270s. Here's what the rear looks like after 1500 hard miles:

    [​IMG]

    Here's what a new one looks like:

    [​IMG]


    It's almost used up. This trip was about 500 miles gravel and a thousand miles paved at typical speeds of 40-60 mph. But keep in mind I weigh 200 pounds and I had camping gear on back.
    #43
  4. no

    no way man no how

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    If anybody tries to tell you these are of low quality or cheap in any way, they just picked up a load of baloney from the wacky crackpot store. I ran it wide open on the pavement a lot of the time with a heavy load up grades, in bad headwinds etc. It just hummed away like magic for 1500 miles and didn't use a drop of oil. When I let the revs drop to idle after a hard run, it just fell back into its perfect popping idle.

    [​IMG]
    #44
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  5. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

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    so, there's a ride report coming, right?

    :evil
    #45
  6. no

    no way man no how

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    6:00 am in Wahpeton, North Dakota:

    [​IMG]

    The Dakotas are very wet this spring. There's water in the ditches everywhere. A waterfowl's paradise. I tried to dodge the ducks but one flew into my left arm while riding at 50 mph. He was stunned but recovered and flew away.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Lake Sakakawea:

    [​IMG]

    The lake was big enough that there was a lake effect...a cold breeze off the lake.

    [​IMG]

    The badlands:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    It was 40 degrees with fog and mist on the way back east through North Dakota:

    [​IMG]
    #46
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  7. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

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    :thumb
    #47
  8. no

    no way man no how

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    I'll think about posting a proper ride report at some time in the future, but these are probably the best pictures. I was having camera trouble. More accurately, the SD card got scrambled.
    #48
  9. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

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    my wife's sd card got hosed (more specifically, i hosed it :cry) and we sent it to some place that managed to recover all the photos.

    i don't remember who it was; we googled around.

    i'm quite impressed with the mileage and timing.

    nice trip!
    #49
  10. steve gs

    steve gs Been here awhile

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    And another item one might want to consider are good quality cycling shorts. I'll have to try that sheepskin cover. I wonder if the shorts when combined with the cover would improve the comfort further.

    Klay, didn't expect you back so soon, you must have been doing 300-400 mile days. What was your longest (mileage) day. Also, what were your average cruise speeds on the surfaced vs graveled roads.

    After your experience with the Kendas how do you rate them. Not much left after your trip. Will you refit again or look elsewhere.



    Looked like a great trip, thanks for the pics.

    Another great ride...:ricky
    #50
  11. no

    no way man no how

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    Oh, and one more thing. This happened during my mini-tour:




    [​IMG]

    10,000 miles on my little thumper. :ricky<!-- / message -->
    #51
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  12. Tantrum

    Tantrum Condescending Nag

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    :clap Congrats! It's cool that you recorded the event. Neat ride pics too.
    #52
  13. no

    no way man no how

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    I rode a slightly shorter distance than I expected and covered more per day than expected. Hence the early return. I averaged about 280 miles per day. (the first 90 miles on the Kendas happened before I left)

    My longest day was Saturday, 361 miles, from Dickinson, ND to Sisseton, SD. I took gravel and secondary roads all the way. It was 40 degrees when I took off. After a period of time I realized I had better stop somewhere and warm up, because my feet and hands were going numb and I realized I was making mental mistakes like thinking the trip meter said 80 after I just looked at it, then looking down again and seeing it was indicating 69. I ran up to a cafe on I94, warmed up and ate, then went southeast again. This was the most memorable day...it just felt like magic with the little thumper humming along flawlessly through the mist and fog amongst the green hills and the weird red and gray erosion formations that crop up here and there.

    Some of the gravel was as good as asphalt and I ran 50-55 mph. The worst was like three inches of sand and I didn't want to exceed 20 with my camping stuff on the back.

    I really ran into bad luck with the wind the first two days. The first day was straight northwest into a powerful gale. I was only able to cruise at about 40 to 45 mph with 1/2 to 2/3 throttle. I recorded a perfomance achievement of an all time low of (drumroll) 44 miles to the gallon. Good thing the DR has the big tank. Reserve was at about 2.75 gallons.

    Then the next day was good as I rode north up the Sheyenne River valley on a run before the wind. This was a lot of twisty gravel, 40-45 mph. Speed limit 25? Nonsense.

    [​IMG]

    After a nice run north, I reluctantly turned west on a beam reach at Carrington. There was a nasty, gusty gale from the south that was blowing the little bike around and she could only manage 40-45 mph with 2/3 or so throttle. This was very fatiguing. I called it a day in McCluskey.

    I know better than this; I should have just gone wherever the wind wanted to blow me. I should have let the wind blow me up to Moose Mountain, where I've always wanted to go exploring more. Another lesson re-learned.

    I picked out roads that were so desolate that I never had a hard time with too many cars coming up behind me and trying to pass. I saw very few motorcyclists.

    The rear Kenda is almost used up, but I like the grip and low, low, price so much that I will get another. The front tire sustained virtually unmeasurable wear.
    #53
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  14. no

    no way man no how

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    :D tnx
    #54
  15. no

    no way man no how

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    Great pictures, Python!
    #55
  16. no

    no way man no how

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    I've never gotten close to 100 mpg. But I can see how if I was really careful, I could pull that off. Usually I ride the 200 with abandon around town and on trails and it turns in 70 to 80 miles to the gallon. If I add in highway and freeway speeds for short bursts the mileage can dip to the 60's.

    Flogging it down the endless road out west against a head wind can really drive the mileage down. Reminds me of my DR650 in that respect.
    #56
  17. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    We had a rider on a DR-200 in yesterday's 3rd Annual Massachusetts Dualsport ride. I don't know if she did any of the Hero Sections, but then a lot of the 1200 GS bikes didn't either. It is ironic or sumthin' to see the 200 and the 1200s riding the same event.
    #57
  18. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

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    minor update:

    i drilled out the plug and backed out the pilot about 1/4 turn. i don't have a ton of miles on her, but after she warms up the throttle response is improved and 55 seems to come up a bit quicker.

    the hesitation is gone when the throttle is opened.

    the idle seems a little off though. i adjusted the idle screw based on feel, comparing it to the f650 since they are supposed to idle at 1400~1600 rpm. once warm, with the choke out, the bike seems to race a bit. warm up is pretty quick though.

    i think 1/4 turn might have been a bit much; i'll play with it and see how 1/8 is.

    overall i think it's an improvement. still needs a some fine tuning...
    #58
  19. steve gs

    steve gs Been here awhile

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    With a good set of knobbies and the OEM 15:45 (or maybe a 15:47) final I would NOT hesitate to take the DR200SE anywhere in the dirt. It's chassis is not up to high speed trail blasting but in the tight technical stuff the torquey engine just climbs like a mule.

    I currently have my bike more biased to the roadways using 15W fork oil and the shock preload set to max.

    Yes, it is the truth; 15:42 final, 4500-4800 rpm cruise (which equates to 42-45mph) 280-290 miles before hitting reserve with stock engine. I'm not bashful about throttle use in accelerating to cruise. Klay, looks like you hit the same reserve point. I fill to the bottom to the filler neck.




    I don't want to be misunderstood on this point but with the common advice out there for beginners to start with a 650 for general adventure touring I have to agree. I was fortunate to begin riding in the dirt and backroads on a 175 2 stroke but many others start in suburbia and need the ponies to be able to stay with and manage traffic. They need a MSF course and a solid well performing bike. A beginner with a small bike in heavy traffic could be a prescription for disaster.

    Now to my point; I see the smaller machines as the relm of the experienced rider who have the skills and knowledge to manage whatever is presented, be it man or nature. They have come to the realization that bigger is not always better and are seeking other solutions for their adventure touring needs. Some of us call this Minimalist Touring. Thanks to all of you for your contributions.



    Another great ride....:ricky
    #59
  20. no

    no way man no how

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    Another North Dakota picture.

    [​IMG]


    I got drowsy while headed west and rode into an abandoned farmstead for a little shelter from the high winds. I lay down in that tall green grass and took a nap. When I woke up, I took a look at the abandoned farm house. It looked like it hadn't been lived in for 15 or 20 years. I could tell it had been beautifully constructed and was still solid. I walked inside. There was a combination electric/wood cooking stove in the kitchen. The oven was wood fired and the range top had electric coils. The hardwood floors were deteriorating, but you could tell they were beautiful when new. The ceilings and walls were of plaster-and-lathe construction.

    It was eery to consider what happened to the people. Why was this beautiful house abandoned? What were the hopes and aspirations of the people who lived here? What stories were lost? This house was built to last a century or two. Why didn't someone else move in if the original people left?

    I forgot to look in the cellar. It was too spooky anyway, with the wind sighing in the windows only accentuating the deep silence of the place.

    Eventually my curiosity of what was over the next hill overcame my interest in the abandoned house and I was off down the road again on the little thumper.
    #60