the DR200 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by klxrdr, May 13, 2007.

  1. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #61
  2. beerjonny

    beerjonny Planning mode...

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    Willow Grove, NB Canada
    Can someone tell me why the 2004 DR200SE I just bought has solid bars?

    I went to install a set of handguards last night and found the bars were filled with metal. I drilled for about 20 minutes but got tired and went to bed :rofl

    Anyone else experience this or do I have a set of cheap aftermarket bars here??
    #62
  3. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Instead of having bar end weights, they welded some solid metal inside the handlebar to dampen vibrations.
    #63
  4. beerjonny

    beerjonny Planning mode...

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    Willow Grove, NB Canada
    That is what I was afraid of.

    So if I want handguards I am to keep on drilling then... that sucks. I drilled a pilot hole to check the depth, and it is longer than the bit...
    #64
  5. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Maybe easier to scrounge up some different handlebars.
    #65
  6. gdeiss

    gdeiss Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    north-central Idaho
    Speaking of handlebars, those on my '97 DR200Se are very slightly bent and new ones are pretty cheap as long as I stay away from interesting alloys. If I'm replacing I'd want something that was a little taller, but I don't want to have to do anything to cables, etc. Any recommendations? How tough a job is it?
    #66
  7. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    30,482
    Location:
    Western Mass
    Just get some aftermarket bars. Even if you keep drilling, are you going to be able to keep that big a hole concentric?
    #67
  8. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I managed to do it once with a GS450E, but it was pretty messy.
    #68
  9. wickedsprint

    wickedsprint Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,386
    Location:
    USA
    We found some aftermarket bars at the dealer, I forget what they were for, but they went right on, howevever the stock throttle cable housing has a plastic tiny nub that fits into a hole on the stock DR200 handlebars, just grind this piece off, it will be blatantly obvious if you try and tighten the throttle housing down on the new bars and you'll see right away what you have to file down. No biggie. The DR200 uses the common bar size, so just find an aftermarket one that is pretty close, I think they were renthal.
    #69
  10. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,286
    Location:
    Golden CO
    Yeah pretty much all bikes made except big crusiers and a few higher end mx bikes use 7/8" bars. Pick out whatever you like, aluminum is lighter and stronger. Either shave the nub off or drill a hole in the new bar.

    have fun
    #70
  11. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    The nub does a good job of holding the switchgear and so on in place, so when you shave it off, you lose the locating feature. The controls slip around on the bar more easily. After shaving off the plastic nub, put a layer of electrical tape on the bar where the control housing clamps down on the bar. That way the controls grab the bar real firmly without having to tighten them excessively.
    #71
  12. A.solgaard

    A.solgaard Norwegian Monster

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    Hey,

    I've found a dr 200 - 96 or 98, I forget, with 600 kms for $2300 canadian. I believe it to be a pretty good deal. my only question is, how bad is it really on the highway? some people on this thread say it's okay, some say not so much. is it really whining out at 100k - 60 miles an hour? I was thinking about doing a trip to baja later on this year, riding from somewhere in SoCal, down, would this bike be sufficient? I have no doubts about it on the trails as far as nimbleness and lightness goes, but the highway thing is my only concern.
    thanks.

    adrian
    #72
  13. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,286
    Location:
    Golden CO
    I don't really know, but my DR250SE is quite tolllerable on the highway. I rode it to work today (40 miles of highway). Mine is stock save a 16T front sprocket. The 250 does have a 6spd and probably a bit more power than the 200. You might be best served finding a DR250SE or DR350SE - cost should be about the same.
    #73
  14. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    If you weigh 130 pounds soaking wet and travel with a minimum of gear, you could change the sprockets so the rpm's aren't so high at 60 mph, and the bike would be all right to go road tripping. But if you're a guy like me, 200 pounds, and want to carry camping gear, the motor is just not big enough, unless you're content with cruising at 45 mph on the highway.

    The 200 would be great once you got to Baja, but getting there would be slow.
    #74
  15. iWander

    iWander Adventure Geek

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    63
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    I weigh 200 pounds and I commute 40 miles to/from work every day with my '05 DR200. With the stock rear sprocket and no engine mods, I found that it cruised happily at 42-45 mph. Sure it could get up to 60-63 mph on the highway, but it buzzed like a damn saw and the vibrations made it feel like it was going to explode at any moment. The sweet spot where it could cruise all day long without pushing the engine too hard was definitely just over 40.

    I just replaced the rear sprocket with a 40-tooth from Rebel Gears. There's a 4-month lead time on the steel 39-tooth, so I went with their recommendation and bought aluminum. It may not last as long, but they're running them on everything and they swear their aluminum isn't soft. Anyway, after 70+ miles I can say that it made the bike much more road-worthy. As near as I can tell, it adds about 12 mph to the bike and it feels like I've added almost one additional gear to the top end. I can cruise all day at 55 mph, and even when I push it to 60 I don't feel the vibrations. I'm sure my mileage will improve as well, but I don't have any numbers just yet. On the low end, I have no problems starting out because that engine has so much torque. It's a little like starting out in 2nd gear, but not quite because my new 1st gear still has more power than my old 2nd gear.....if you can follow that.:confused

    It's important to note, however, that my top speed on flat pavement is still around 63 mph because of the reduction in power. It'll go faster if I tuck or lose 50 pounds (my wife says just cut my head off), but that really wasn't my goal. I was looking for a way to keep up with traffic on some of our rural highways, and I got exactly that. I don't climb trees with my bike, so the "loss" of my lowest gear is a non-issue. I couldn't be happier with the results.

    Now I just need a DR350/650 to cover the interstate and long-range touring, and then I'll be all set.:D
    #75
  16. steve gs

    steve gs Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2004
    Oddometer:
    432
    Location:
    Anchorville, Michigan
    As a matter of fact I just ordered a 40T and expect to receive next week. Expect this final change to bump my cruise from 42-45mph to 45-48mph. Just hope the roll-off is reasonable.

    I'm lucky in that I have the 200 and 350 and can do back to back comparisons. I'm also lucky in that I only weigh 140 and pretty much figure that my total touring load (including me) is about 220-230 lbs. The funny thing is that I prefer the 200 for touring and the 350 for dirt road and trail blasting. However, I will probably tour the 350 this year once I get my packing system sorted out. The 200 certainly wears panniers better than the 350 so I will most likely go the "U" bag route with the 350. Will also have to go with a larger tank as well to get the necessary range. Found that the 350 meets or exceeds my 650 in nearly all categories and leaves me with little reason to keep my 650.

    My 350 is set up with knobbies and the 200 with trailwings. I can take the 200 (if knobby shod) anywhere the 350 can go but just not as fast. The 200 is quieter, has a lower seat height, is simple to service, has fantastic range and economy, and it's easier to do "on the road" oil changes.

    :ricky
    #76
  17. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    30,482
    Location:
    Western Mass
    No, you should have more doubts. How tall are you? Anything over about 5'-6" and the DR-200 is too small in the seat to pegs distance, as well as the bars being too low. The seat to pegs size matters a lot for actual off-roading (not just off-pavement) since an off-road rider will be (should be) transitioning from sitting to standing hundreds of times per ride. (Unless they just stand the whole time!)

    If the seat is too low in relation to the pegs, then the transitions are overly tiring. And for anyone escpat a rather small person, the DR-200 is too small for off-roading. But it is okay if you are only gonaa sit yer butt on the seat to go down a dirt ROAD (off-PAVEMENT but not off-ROAD).
    #77
  18. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    19,993
    Location:
    caro, michigan
    if i could have only one bike, this wouldn't be it. i love my dr200, but unless you are willing to travel slowly it's not the best bike.

    i have a 39 tooth sprocket to install to get the rpms down at highway speed, but i don't have any illusions of interstate blasting once it's on.

    and like viverrid says, if you're taller then getting up on it will be a problem. i'm 5'4" and it's almost a little short when i stand up on it (which isn't too often).
    #78
  19. no

    no way man no how

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    114,316
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I've been wondering about that myself a little. I don't have anything in the 350-400 cc range. So far, I have decided that if I could only have one bike, it would be the 650 thumper. Alas, while the 200 is a nonpareil commuter/utility/light-touring bike, it just doesn't have the long-distance capability of the 650. If I had a DR350, maybe that would be my favorite.
    #79
  20. green hell

    green hell yawning or snarling

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    19,993
    Location:
    caro, michigan
    i have a couple pair of cycling shorts.

    never worn them on the dr, but they are ok on the f650.

    don't spend a lot of money on cycling shorts if you buy them. i have a cheap pair and an expensive pair and there is really not much difference.

    and, uh, boxers don't work well under cycling shorts. an unfinished basement is generally preferable.
    #80