the DR650 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by sleepywombat, May 1, 2006.

  1. Copracer288

    Copracer288 How hard can it be?

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    Well said.

    You know, I’ve been through my share of bikes and I have a nice bunch now but the bike I can ride with the most skill and that I’m most comfortable with, BY FAR, is my work bike, a ‘13 Harley Police Electra Glide. I am more comfortable and more confident on that 900+ lb pig than my 260 lb Beta. Why is that? Seat time. Riding it every day and also training and competing with it (if you’ve never watched videos of “police motorcycle skills competition”, check some out). I know that bike so well that when I get on it, it honestly feels like a part of me. As corney as that sounds, it’s true. I know exactly how that bike is going to react to any control input in any situation and what’s more, it’s all instinctive.

    We spend so much time trying to find that unicorn (and I am as guilty of that as anyone!) but if you just get a bike and put in the seat time, quality seat time with some good training, you would be amazed at how skilled you can become.

    I really should take my own advice with my off road riding! :hmmmmm
  2. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud Supporter

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    When I lived in the DFW area years ago and was an MSF instructor, there were two DFW airport police officers as students in the experience rider course one weekend. Both were on their KZ1000 police bikes, and were required to take the MSF course as a prerequisite to becoming instructors themselves.

    I'm sure for the reasons you stated, their skills were amazing. They entertained the rest of us during breaks when they'd practice their slow speed turns and side by side riding techniques. That's when I realized that motorcycle officers are likely the best trained riders that exist.

    During one of our exercises, where each student was supposed to reach 20 mph before braking on my signal and then turning, one of them pulled out his radar gun while awaiting his next run. He'd call out everyone's approach speed, and yell "Get 'em John!" when anyone was either side of 20 mph. :lol3

    Great fun that day; one of the best classes I ever had the pleasure of instructing. Another was the local women's HOG chapter, and that a whole 'nother story. :D
  3. Copracer288

    Copracer288 How hard can it be?

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    I first went through the 40 hour police motorcycle certification 12 years ago on a BMW GS650 (our department had two of those for patrolling City parks). A year later I went through the course again on the Harley went I got accepted into the Traffic Unit. Those 40 hours are grueling and by the end you are flat worn out.

    Several years ago I went through one of the toughest police motorcycle instructor schools in the country and it was, without a doubt, the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life (and I’ve done some shit!). Since becoming an instructor I would love to expand the course to 3 weeks but honestly, I don’t think most guys could do it. It just drains you and wears you out. You would be surprised what we do with those bikes including fair amount of off road work.
  4. cyberdos

    cyberdos Easy Bonus Loop ♦♦

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    I'm in heaven.

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  5. Weldman

    Weldman Long timer

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    Awesome! Two attachment points makes so much sense.
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  6. Weldman

    Weldman Long timer

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    So I wonder about cutting a few inches off the length of the hitch arm and then redrilling the hitch pin hole, in essence choking up on the length a tad to put it closer to the tailgate. Or better yet just relocate the hole so the whole arm, untrimmed, slides in farther. If it will do that without bottoming out.
  7. AlH

    AlH Long timer

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    Oh man the memories- spent many an hour digging around in ASR 33's complete with paper punch and reader. Back in the 70's again.
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  8. psmcd

    psmcd Long timer

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    I think that's possible specific to the bike (or bikes) you intend to haul. Handlebar width and slope of your rear topper window are immediate limits but also rolling the bike up the ramp and and the front (between bike & truck) tie down point come into play. There's a good bit of rocking that goes on as you load and tie down. I think the hitch hauler builders have built in space to accommodate all the variables and we can reduce the lever arm somewhat for our use. Even securely tied down the bike will still bounce on the suspension and rock forward so you still need space between the bar end and window. For reference my bar width is only 30".

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  9. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    I like mine a lot. Installation is simple. Keeps the wind pressure off my chest but it might increase the air turbulence a little around my head. I also like that it makes a little dash area to toss gloves in on top of the cowling.

    FYI I am 6' plus a little and ride on a Procycle seat. If you look for posts by me here or on the picture thread you'll see it installed on my bike.

    My only complaint is I wish it were more easily removable for occasional rides without. I guess I could get a second cowling for that purpose...
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  10. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    @NC Rick, There is a call from OSHA on line 1. Rick, OSHA on line 1...
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  11. Dalmatino

    Dalmatino Been here awhile

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    Yea it's a 6 pro dual sim. It was $230 ca on Amazon. Excellent phone! Got a A2 lite also. It's nicer in some ways but for some reason I still prefer the Pro.
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  12. MrBob

    MrBob Cisgendered Supporter

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    These guys put on a good show. I hope they were getting OT for doing it.
    Denver trained its motor cops in a parking lot along my bicycle commute to work, so I got to watch them progress from Day 1. Eventually, they could toss those hogs around with abandon. It looked to me that during their tight cornering practice they covered the rear brake and the clutch to maintain control.
  13. Weldman

    Weldman Long timer

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    Yeah I don't want to break the window on my cap. Another thing to consider. Thanks.
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  14. drmiller100

    drmiller100 Long timer

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    Peak combustion pressures occur at peak torque, by definition. above that RPM you don't get complete cylinder filling due to lack of time with valves being open, below that the cam overlap allows charge to leak back out.

    Detonation DESTROYS air cooled motors very quickly. Air cooled can have VERY high cylinder head temps. Low speed, up a steep hill, or idling seems to cause my bike to get the hottest.
    Crappy jetting causes lean spots just off idle with the stock POS shaped needle.

    I reshaped my needle per the aussie mod. I have a HC piston. My bike pulls cleanly from 2000 on. No bucking, no noises MOST of the time. When it is HOT, and I'm at low elevation (below 3500 feet), I don't run below 3000 rpm. When life is good, and I'm on single track, I'll tractor along at 2000 rpm for quite a while.

    The engine bucking IMO tears stuff up. Smoothly pulling like an EFI bike does not
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  15. drmiller100

    drmiller100 Long timer

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    Mine will.
  16. Sonny S.

    Sonny S. Long timer

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    You'll do that in 5th gear?
  17. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Yep, its the key to low speed control. Maintain drive with a steady throttle, modulate clutch if needed due to gearing, and control speed with the rear brake, not the throttle.
  18. Sonny S.

    Sonny S. Long timer

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    But why? What's the point of 30 mph in 5th gear?
  19. drmiller100

    drmiller100 Long timer

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    I bought one. It broke when it fell into my garage door at my house.
    I mounted it an inch off the plastic cowling cuz that is where a previous homemade shield already caused holes to be drilled.
    I'm 6'2. Wind hits me in the mouth, absolutely no turbulence. It is never in the way off road.
    I'll buy another happily.
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  20. drmiller100

    drmiller100 Long timer

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    A well tuned carb lets you go super slow, consistent, in first gear in bad terrain.
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