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The GCRAD1-ADVrider approach to the HONDA XR100

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by GCRad1, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. GCRad1

    GCRad1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    525
    Location:
    costa mesa, ca., usa, earth, sector-28
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    Original goal: Purchased two Honda XR100’s for my daughters to learn how to ride.
    Secondary goal: Have one that I could ride along with my younger daughter, thus have it set up so that I could ride it.

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    When I was shopping for these two bikes, I ran across one that listed as having BBR adult springs front and rear with Pro Taper handlebars, thus I jumped on this one quickly! My older daughter gave up on riding once a job and car came into being. But my youngest daughter is still riding so, I have an excuse to ride one. riding the XR100 is great as I can stop and take photos and easily maneuver around her and is simply fun. And I’m not spraying her at every corner with my XR400 or ATK605. I get to see the obstacle and terrain from her perspective.

    But when I’m not riding with her, am I riding the XR100? YOU BET! All you have to do is re-think your approach to riding a “mini bike.”

    Most of you would not be seen out riding a little mini-bike, especially by yourself. But why do a lot of MX pro’s have them and why do they ride them? I finally got my answer, in that I was told that it forces you to learn how to carry momentum through the turns. OK, but I have no aspirations to even ride on a MX track, much less, be a MX pro.

    From an ADVrider state of mind, why do I ride a XR100? IT IS SIMPLY FUN! Beyond that, I can ride technical trails that I would rather not take the 400/605. I have ridden the same trails on the bigger bikes, but time and time again, I like to take the XR100 just for the shear fun! It’s more fun to ride a smaller bike at 120% of the bikes limit versus a larger bike at say 75% of its capability. Lets be honest with here… I am not a pro. I have ridden bikes my whole life, but at what level? I road around in the woods with very little input from the outside world. I had a bike and I road. My father gave me these simple rules about riding in my “front yard” of the Talladega National Forest of Alabama; don’t run out of gas and don’t get hurt. So, my level of riding is not of some great skill level of say Gary Bailey or Dick Mann.

    With that, am I still learning riding technique? While I am 48, still hope so! Either way, I am riding and having fun! And at the same time, I think I am helping my daughter be a better rider as I'm riding with her, getting her out there. And I am not afraid to drag her into stuff that I would most likely not do with her if I was on the big bike. When I say “drag her into,” I have a couple of riding places that have steep ravens and tight twisty trails that are fun to ride off into just to see were they go. I didn't have this opportunity to ride with my father in the woods growing up, so I would only ride within my capabilities, not pushing any boundaries other than the unknown dirt road. When you visually see someone else do something that your first instinct tells you not to do, this helps your learning curve progression. Getting my daughter out is a whole learning experience in return with MASSIVE reward!

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    And once the bike becomes dedicated to one's self... more fun begins! What can be done to these things? What is needed to set it up for more adult fun? What more can be done? And from an ADVrider's perspective... I don't know all the answers, but that is part of the journey!

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    In the mean time, I will be nursing this little puppy as I was having way too much fun this past weekend riding the XR100 on the Cajon Pass!
    #1
  2. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,574
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    As long as YOU are having fun , who cares what others think......my thoughts exactly regarding my Yamaha TW200 and my Honda pcx150 !!!.
    #2
  3. GCRad1

    GCRad1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    525
    Location:
    costa mesa, ca., usa, earth, sector-28
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    When I purchased these bikes, one of the first things that needed replacement was the fork seals as they were leaking fluid out especially when captain fat butt was on the bike!

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    Working on the little XR100 is rather simple and the front forks are super simple compared to full size forks as there are NO shim stacks - NO SHIMS EVEN. Fork cap at the top allows the fluid and spring out and the allen bolt at the bottom holds the shaft in place. I think, I don't even know exactly, but that is how simple it is! This makes for a great first-timers project for yourself and with your kid and you get to include math for measuring of fluid levels!

    Here is a comparison image to the KTM 950ADV fork parts being rebuilt at Precision Concepts.
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    As you can see - LOTS OF PARTS!

    If you are looking to do this project and want to beef up your XR100, BBR has the springs that they say are, "Custom developed by BBR for adult riders and fast kids. Preset and stress-relieved for long life. Fits stock forks."
    Front Springs: http://www.bbrmotorsports.com/Products/products.aspx?Prod=650-HXR-1005
    Rear Spring: http://www.bbrmotorsports.com/Products/products.aspx?Prod=660-HXR-1005

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    OK, with the seals replaced, add the appropriate amount of fork juice::deal
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    For the XR100 I used Maxima's 10 Weight Fork Oil.

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    As the instructions say, no spring - fully compressed, add fluid.

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    Then carefully poke the toothpick.

    While the front wheel was off:
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    I did a little service work to the front axle. Emory cloth or scotchbrite pad will do the trick and the idea is to have the axle nice and smooth. This is something I read about Baja preparation by the Honda team. I think they do it for ease & quickness of front tire changes so I always thought that if its good enough for them to pay attention to, it was good of me to do the same!
    #3
  4. GCRad1

    GCRad1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    525
    Location:
    costa mesa, ca., usa, earth, sector-28
    So the next little area to address:
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    The sad state of affairs happening off the backend of the bike. Here is the stock chain guide that was already cracked when I bought the bike. With XR100 wheel centers & ground clearance closer to the ground than say, 19/21" wheel bike, things are going to get beat up more. Keeping the chain moving in a forward direction is important as the aluminum cases can be severely damaged if the chain goes off the track and into the case. BBR has done a really great job on addressing chain guide issues on the HONDA XR100, when most others stop at the CRF250.
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    Thus, I present to you, my first functional bling! The BBR Chain Guide. This design fully wraps the chain with a massive PTFE/POM thermoplastic material with aluminum side plates on both side. The whole of this design is to guide the chain onto the rear sprocket.
    #4
  5. GCRad1

    GCRad1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    525
    Location:
    costa mesa, ca., usa, earth, sector-28
    [​IMG]
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    Got my favorite Progrip 714 Rally grips wire tied on!
    I just love these 714rally's! I usually give a shot of spray paint to get the grips on and wire tie for secondary backup and visual functional bing.
    #5
  6. GCRad1

    GCRad1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    525
    Location:
    costa mesa, ca., usa, earth, sector-28
    [​IMG]
    I really don't want to come off as a BBR broke record, but while I was ordering the BBR Chain guide, I really needed the Sub Frame Cradle for my fat butt!

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    This is with the stock skid pie pan removed. You can see how the frame uses the motor case as a major weight bearing structure.

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    The BBR Sub Frame protects engine and helps prevent frame stretching as the motor is part of the frame structure. This also makes for a more robust skid plate as well as the stock plate is more suited for pork chops and potato salad!
    You can still get to the drain plug without removing the subframe as well. I've already put it to good use and its interesting the sound that comes off of it when rocks and such ping it just right. But the most important part - its doing what it's suppose to do before I crack an engine case!
    #6