The GS keeps getting Heavier...would you switch to a lighter bike like the KTM 790?

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by rforrester, Nov 8, 2018.

?

Would you trade your GS for the new KTM 790 Adventure R? (and pocket a few thousand)

Poll closed Nov 18, 2018.
  1. Yes, I want a lighter bike and the 790 ticks all the boxes...

    100 vote(s)
    65.8%
  2. No, I want to keep my GS and possibly buy a new one.

    52 vote(s)
    34.2%
  1. BubbaMcCranky

    BubbaMcCranky Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Oddometer:
    35
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, USA
    Amen! How did you arrange to keep the bike near SLC?
    #61
  2. CeNTeRed

    CeNTeRed Congadude

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7
    Location:
    Eastern Australia
    No, I want to keep my G/S!

    Attached Files:

    #62
    tomdubz likes this.
  3. adventurelarry

    adventurelarry n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1
    For me a bike must fit like a shoe. My best bud has the GS and I think its the best on the highway, aside from knee scraping. I bought the KTM 1190 because my vstrom 650 was not really capable in the dirt. I took it everywhere anyway but it still weighed about 460lbs. My 1190 is ferocious but in the dirt it feels like a dirt bike and on the street it handles like a sportbike. Its not as confy as the GS but if KTM makes a bike that feels like a dirtbike and is a smooth traveler on the road Im going to buy it. After all I have traveled everywhere on the Vstrom.
    #63
  4. Out of Range

    Out of Range Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Richmond
    IMG_0102.JPG Lighter Bike??? Total ride weight Unknown! I shaved 45lbs off my ride with P90x! Now no matter what gear I put on or take off the ride is 45lbs lighter!

    Attached Files:

    #64
    joelee, Grounded and krussell like this.
  5. J2I

    J2I n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    22556
    Since you have 800, 1200, and 1600 I wanted to get your opinion. I have 1600gtl, which I commute on to work 80 miles each day on highway. This is the most comfortable bike I have owned for the interstates. My buddy and I are planning to do a trip to AK in 2020, so I start considering trading my bike for 1200 GS, but afraid it will be too much of a compromise. Meaning, it will not be nearly as comfortable on the highway, but also too heavy to go offroad. My other idea is to keep GTL and add 790. What's your take?
    #65
  6. Beairmo

    Beairmo Keeping it real Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    427
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    The K1600GTL is an AWESOME machine. No debating that. But it sucks bad on gravel roads. You can't stand up and its not geared for really slow movement to point out the obvious.

    I have found that my R1200GSA is even more comfortable for highway riding than the K1600. I have a Sargent seat and Puig windscreen which enables me to ride 20+ days (did the Butt Lite in July... 5500 miles in 7 days). It is a little buzzy compared to the 1600 of course but I have no reservations to set the cruise at 80mph. And being able to ride standing up extends my riding significantly.

    The one thing not discussed much in this thread is the PERCEIVED weight of the bike. One thing about the boxer engine is that it really lowers the COG. So much that I honestly thought the 1200 was lighter than the 800.

    I have no regrets with loosing the 1600 and don't miss it all. I mostly had it to take the wife with me and she lost interest in that. I don't think you would have any regrets. But get the GSA, not the GS if going to AK. The extra fuel capacity is so nice.

    [​IMG]
    #66
    joelee likes this.
  7. J2I

    J2I n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    22556
    Thank you for the reply. I am waiting to test ride 1250. One thing I did not like about 1200, is it felt like a tractor after smooth 1600. My understanding it has been addressed to some degree with the new bike.
    #67
  8. szramer

    szramer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Indianapolis/ UE
    if u a hardcore adv rider u already have 990/1090, gsa folks stay away from offroad so doubt they gonna switch :jack , but im down to replace 990 with 790 after they sort it out first year of production :y0!
    #68
  9. Aldiana

    Aldiana n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1
    I wouldn’t switch. Tried a few KTMs and the roughness is just not for me. But again, everybody likes different stuf.. thanks god...:)
    #69
  10. hubilado

    hubilado Motoquiero Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    729
    Location:
    New Mexico
    ++++1
    This looks like the true modern day replacement for the old 640ADV.
    #70
  11. FlyLow

    FlyLow Just Ride Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    150
    I realized that my 2017 GS was too heavy for dirt roads - for me. Sold it. Inseam of 30" was part of my considerations. I am getting either a KTM 790 or Moto Guzzi V85 TT because they are lighter bikes. I understand the differences between he two bikes, and will get the one that "talks" to me the most. Plan on traveling a lot of dirt roads, and having fun at the same time.
    #71
  12. RAGrote

    RAGrote Fishin w PICO

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,034
    Location:
    Colorado fire road wandering....
    Yes. I would.
    #72
  13. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,761
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    Why would you consider anything but your 1600gti for the Alaska trip? It's paved all the way to any of the primary destinations.

    Are you planning to intentionally find places to ride that aren't paved for some reason?

    ...ken...
    #73
  14. J2I

    J2I n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    22556
    Maybe it's my misconception about AK. I just always thought it is gravel at best with bunch of potholes
    #74
  15. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,761
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    I've been up there twice, unfortunately never on a bike. Twice I flew to Anchorage on business and rented a car specifically to run around the vicinity and see the sights. Loads of excellent paved roads. And the ones going into some of the more common attractions that aren't paved are still excellent for ordinary cars and street bikes.

    A third trip we drove up from the Canadian prairies (southern Saskatchewan) headed for Whitehorse (Yukon Territory). It was a spur of the moment trip and we didn't allocate enough time for it. So we hung a left a few miles west of Watson Lake, south down #37 highway. That was the only road we took that had unpaved sections, about 2/3 of it. That was a few years ago and I understand they have paved even more of it. Even if they haven't, I would not hesitate to take a touring bike or compact car over it. The only minor issue we had was that it was a bit dusty in places when a big truck came by. We even took a beautiful side trip from Dease Lake along the Stikine River into Telegraph Creek. Not paved but still something I wouldn't hesitate to take street bike or car on.

    The point with respect to driving/riding to Alaska is that most folks preconceptions of the roads they'll be dealing with is quite misplaced. Talking to the locals in Watson Lake was that the highway over to Fairbanks and down to Anchorage was no different to what we had already been on. We were driving a 2000 Honda CR-V at the time and never needed the ground clearance or all wheel drive.

    You do have to be conscious of fuel and food stops because there can be significant distances between sometimes.

    If there are particular places you want to see, you do have to check a map in advance to see what the roads are like. Just like you do in Montana or Texas or Kansas or California or the Carolinas or Washington or British Columbia or... :-)

    ...ken...
    #75
  16. Iraj

    Iraj Geezer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15
    Location:
    Bay Area
    I admit I read page one and then went to page four, so my points may have already been made. My prime reasons for keeping the GSW (after an '09 GS oilhead) are two: Fuel consumption and driveshaft. I consistently get just below 50mpg, fully loaded, irrespective of whether I'm chasing the twisties or honking on a highway. (70 and above will cut into the figure but I'm not on the highways that much.) The KTM Superduke figures online show below 40. When I get off the bike in the evening, after ten hours and 300 to 400 miles, the last thing I want to do is work on a chain. Yes it's a fat cow, and yes I have trouble putting it on the center stand, but its other civilized qualities fit me perfectly for the mostly on-road touring I do. I've taken it onto trails (most recently the "hill" from Bella Coola to Williams Lake, BC -- in below-40 deg. rain; and the '09 to Inuvik), and it's quite competent for that, but I would take my R80ST/GS or another of the smaller purpose-built bikes on real off-road adventures.

    In response to Ken and J21, the ride to Inuvik (via the Dempster Highway) is 500 miles of pea gravel. Think what riding on marbles would be like. It's not technical but, for me, it was a constant battle to relax and let the bike have its head. Beasts of every sort will do it or the Dalton to Prudhoe Bay. The most frequently seen bikes on the Demptser (in 2012) were big GSs and KLRs. Apart from the two 'destination' routes, expect long straight roads in Canada and Alaska, for which you'll be happy to be on a fast, comfortable bike. The Cassiar Highway presents some fun, but not really challenging twisties, and the road from Dawson through Chicken to Tok is also fun. Off-road is another world I haven't explored in the North.
    #76
  17. J2I

    J2I n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    22556
    Thank you Ken :) I guess I am keeping my GTL
    #77
  18. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,761
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    #78
  19. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,761
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    Thanks for adding to it Iraj. Yes, the Cassiar (#37 between Watson Lake, Yukon, and Kitwanga, BC, is not a challenging riding road. But it's one of the prettiest drives I've been on. We took 5 days to do just the Cassiar in the trip I mentioned above. We spent a full day on the side trip from Dease Lake into Telegraph Creek and back. Then we spent a day on another side trip to Stewart, BC, and Hyder, AK. The glaciers on that drive are spectacular viewing.

    A friend and I have long wanted to do "the hill" from Williams Lake to Bella Coola but it's always been really crappy weather whenever we've been in the area so we still haven't managed it. :-(

    A long time riding friend has done the Dempster. He did it in a Toyota FJ a few years ago and said he would never do it on a bike for just the reason you mentioned. That, plus the dust.

    ...ken...
    #79
  20. JohnnyWaffles

    JohnnyWaffles Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    749
    Location:
    Aurora, CO
    TLDR

    I'm not sure why a GS rider would switch to a 790. All the GS stories on page 4 talk about gravel running on cruise control and 5500 miles in 5 days. A 790 will never match the GS mileage eating ability and comfort.
    #80