The Hilleberg Tent thread

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by Jedi5150, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    For 99.9% of us, modern 3 season tents from Exped, Eureka, etc. are more than enough. They are well thought out, well made, & reasonably priced. The tents from Hilleberg represent wild overkill.

    BUT... They don't call them the "Roaring 40s" for nothing. Environments like Patagonia & the Aussie Outback are just where the extra expense of a Hilleberg might just be justified. I'd cringe more at the extra pack size, than the price.
    stevedo likes this.
  2. bjorn240

    bjorn240 Good with a map!

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    I grew up in a rainy country... but the simple fact that you can pitch the inner and outer simultaneously and avoid rain on the floor of a Hilleberg is a big advantage in my eyes. FWIW, my Nammatj is from 1997 or 1998, and the cost per night in that tent is well below a buck. I agree that the black label tents are expensive, but for winter ski touring and alpinism, and long term/distance touring by pushbike or motorbike, I think they’re the right solution.
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  3. stevedo

    stevedo Been here awhile

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    Hi guys, thanks for your input :-), certainly helping me to clarify my thoughts. I'm probably suffering a little analysis paralysis. A black label Hilleberg is definitely in my future (August when I return home for a short visit before continuing our travels to Patagonia). Probably a Keron 3GT in red. The only nagging doubt I have in the back of my mind is the overall length of the tent at just over five metres or 199 inches. It may just be too long for some formal pitches???
  4. Bug Dr.

    Bug Dr. Extroverted Loner

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    Yes, it could be too long for some. However, it will surely be nice for the ones where it fits. My guess is that it will fit in more spots than you might guess. Also, I'd bet you will tweak and adapt where needed to make it work.

    With tents, I'd much rather have too much than too little in both size and quality, especially, in remote country such as Patagonia.
    Mike
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  5. bjorn240

    bjorn240 Good with a map!

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    It also doesn’t really care if the vestibule is pitched a little wonky. Long as the tent is flat, the site will work.
  6. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    Might be a problem up here in heavily forested New England, but the open Pampas of Patagonia? I think not. Same probably true in the Aussie Outback.
  7. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Amen to that, We have had a Macpac tent for ~15 years that uses a similar system, an absolute no brainer IMHO. (anybody looking at a Nallo 2 but turned off by the $$$$ should check out the Macpac Minaret BTW) Now the Minaret is starting to show it's age we are thinking about a Nallo 2 GT - quite similar to our trusty Minaret but with a bigger vestibule for the pile of riding gear or for cooking in.

    Cheers
    Clint
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  8. MTBRALPH

    MTBRALPH Been here awhile

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    Staika- had it for 6 years now. Just as good as new. Used snowshoe touring in the Rockies and motorcycle and car camping. I do use a 2 pound single person for lightweight backpacking in moderate weather.


    17966B04-3265-4223-BA5D-DC523B4A7C46.jpeg D6BEB490-F67E-43E6-8305-9B21FB569FD3.jpeg
  9. RJAMT

    RJAMT Who remembered the winch? Supporter

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    ^^^^ overkill in pleasant weather but I do love my Staika in cold or stormy weather.

    I was at a motorcycle rally in March and a big storm blew through at night. I didn't even realize it was strong until I heard the folks with the collapsed tent crying/cussing next to me. My Staika didn't budge.
  10. Cheaperthanyou

    Cheaperthanyou n00b

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    Thanks to this thread I used my new Staika a couple of weeks ago near Saranac Lake NY. The weather was not the best but the tent E7F01B04-671D-4A57-8C12-83C6E76ACB47.jpeg worked great. Thanks for everyone’s input.
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  11. Paladin53

    Paladin53 Adventurer Supporter

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    It's like horsepower.
    You don't always need the full capabilities, but when you do its there.
    OZ7fS3k3RB+aGDKjlI7I6g.jpg
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  12. AdvMoto18

    AdvMoto18 NORDO

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    Or Baja Mexico along the Sea of Cortez north of Bahia de Los Angeles. My Hille Unna was the only tent that survived 60MPH+ winds one night in May 2017. At least 15 other tents were shredded.

    Or Wyoming plains where the wind was in excess of 50 MPH last spring.

    If you moto camp out west, its only a matter of time before you run into 50+ MPH winds.

    Your tent is your shelter and if it fails, you will be potentially cold, wet and miserable; or worse.

    A Hille tent is truly a survival shelter. But, it comes at the expense of high price, weight, and packed form factor (the latter two certainly a consideration when traveling by moto).

    "represent wild overkill".
    As a retired airline pilot flying mostly international, it reminds me of a passenger comment. The passenger was reflecting on the notion that pilots were paid too much for what we did. Of course, that day was beautiful and full of sunshine.

    I remarked, instead of you flying on this fine day, it's your wife and kids onboard. It's night, blowing snow, high winds, we've had an engine failure and an associated hydraulic system cease to function. The plane is a handful to fly. Do I make too much money now? Of course, his reply was absolutely not. Our training and skills are not "overkill". They are for when the unplanned becomes the current event.


    So everything should be put into proper context. You can plan for the best weather using middle or bottom shelf tents and have a fine time. But, what happens when things do not go as planned and the weather turns to dog meat? Your flimsy tent quickly becomes your survival shelter. Is a less expensive tent worth illness or death?

    Hille's are expedition tents, no doubt. And there are other manufacturers making expedition worthy tents as well. Fortunately, we all have a choice.

    Your "overkill" is my "norm" with my Unna and Staika.
  13. Cycle61

    Cycle61 making it up as I go Supporter

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    Truth right here. The nine pound Tarra is a handful on most trips, but we spend a lot of time above treeline, and when a big mountain decides to throw down some real weather, you had better be very well prepared.

    I've posted this before, but this was on Mt Rainier a few years ago, somewhere around 10,000 feet, on a highly exposed snowfield. The climb up had been clear and beautiful spring weather, but as sunset drew near the temperature dropped rapidly and it began to get windy. We leveled a platform, set up camp, anchored the tent with ice axes and pickets, and spent the night secure and comfortable while listening to a storm rage outside. Winds at the lodge below registered 65mph sustained, with gusts to 80. Over a dozen other parties on the mountain that night got their tents shredded, and used the tattered remains as bivy sacks, huddled against the rocks in cold and misery.

    [​IMG]
  14. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Hilleberg fan myself, but nevertheless I have to comment on the plane scenario.
    There’s not a single commercial flight that takes off with triple the amount of needed jet fuel, is there? Of course they need to have a reserve to account for a number of different conditions, but within limits.
    climberevan likes this.
  15. AdvMoto18

    AdvMoto18 NORDO

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    Fuel load is determined by distance to destination and reserve fuel as mandated by Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).

    But on occasion, I carried a lot of extra fuel when weather was going to be dog meat at destination and nearest suitable alternate was 1000 miles away.

    I've carried enough fuel on a 757 to fly from Miami to Cancun and back because the fuel at Cancun was contaminated due to a hurricane.

    So the short answer, you bet, I've carried many tons of extra fuel when the weather was bad or had caused significant problems.

    From a pilot's perspective, fuel you don't have is one of the things you always wish you had. But airlines are looking to save every penny to maximize profit. Thus, the Captain cannot merely ask for extra fuel without a valid reason to do so.

    Back in the 70s and 80s, if a Captain wanted 5000# extra fuel just because, he got it. That is no longer the case today. The Finance Department runs every single airline today.
  16. AugustFalcon

    AugustFalcon Long timer

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    If I was going to Patagonia with my Keron 4 G
    T I would definitely bring an extra set of poles so that I could double pole it if necessary.

    Years ago the remnants of a hurricane went through where I was set up and one of my poles broke when the wind shifted. Hilleberg warranteed the tent and pole too I think. And gave me a deal on the newer 10 mm poles. My tent is an older model that came with 9 mm poles.
    AdvMoto18 likes this.
  17. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer Super Supporter

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    I've heard the same complaint about us IT guys...overpaid. My analogy is that we're like insurance. You don't buy insurance for the good times, you buy it for the bad times. When shit goes sideways, all those premiums you paid out are now the best investment you ever made.

  18. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

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    Are you saying the only way to get people to actually do what they're hired to do is to have them overpaid? :ear
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  19. rider1150gsadv

    rider1150gsadv Long timer

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    The MOA rally in Gillette WY was a prime example of why a more substantial tent is a necessity when you're in an area known for adverse weather. I had fully staked out my Exped Andromeda and gave extra stakes (MSR Groundhogs btw) to my neighbor so he could do the same. Our tents survived the 50-60MPH wind-gusts and rain without issue, unlike our neighbors who made fun of us staking our tents out the way we did... Many dozens of tents were destroyed that night..
    Expedition tents may be overbuilt, but I'd rather have it and not need it than the other way around...YMMV
    Cigar likes this.
  20. bjorn240

    bjorn240 Good with a map!

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    I'm taking my 22 year old Nammatj (upgraded 10mm poles) up Shasta this weekend. Forecast calls for 4-5 inches of snow and winds up to 55 mph. I think I’ll be delighted to have the Hilleberg. And yeah, I’m going to dig a deep deep pit first.
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