The Honda Aero 125 Thread

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by RedArrow, Nov 14, 2013.

  1. Fiftygrit

    Fiftygrit Been here awhile

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    I've never owned an Aero, I just like this thread, civilized conversation, nice.
  2. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Well, I did buy that Liftiing aid - hell of a price new at £1500 but looking on eBay I found one advertised as being ex-ambulance issue having an asking price of £550 ....I offered £450 and got it! It’s a good piece of kit and well made that will last for years and is complete with new batteries and charger, of course it’s operation needs two reasonably athletic persons to position a body onto it and then inflate each of four sections secquentially while assisting the casualty to remain upright, when at full height (about 30”) the casualty can be moved carefully onto a nearby chair....
    Somewhat difficult to use by me if I’m collapsed on the floor - but nevertheless it’s of great assistance if any help can be captured locally.


    Jim
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  3. CMS

    CMS Been here awhile

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    Uncle !!!!!!
  4. BandBGuy

    BandBGuy Been here awhile

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    I popped in here early on in 2013 when I got my Aero and still have it. I have found lots of info about replacement piston magic, belt replacement and a handful of advice on all of the nuances of this neat little piece of history. This thread is hopefully forever archivable to the remaining folks who are still interested in keeping these going. I also enjoyed all of the banter back and forth new vs. old. Health is a major player in here as well, I lost both of my parents last year one right after another and they were young 70 & 71. I will stay here as long as you all wanna hang out. My Aero was purchased in Sept 2013 with 4500 miles and today -has 5300 miles!! At this rate, it should go forever :lol3! I just don't ride it a lot. I did pick up a minty 1995 Ninja last July that I could not resist for a few hundred books. I like it a lot and really needed almost no work! I live among super steep hills and valleys the Ninja is just so much fun. The Aero will hold 40 on any hill but you know... @Squar I can relate to the concept of selling off prized possessions. I have the same situation with New York Yankee memorabilia I have some super valuable pieces. I would want to be in a position where I could legislate the passing on such incredible pieces. Those pieces become a part of us. It would be unfair for me to ask my sister to ebay off my Yogi Berra Rookie card or Babe Ruth signed baseball. Nothing is really owned in this world, we just have temporary custody of them. And maybe most importantly was all the Puch Moped chatter lol, in the 90's I built 64CC w/ 15MM carbs Maxi/magnums for all the rich kids in the neighborhood. I used to order bore kits, at the time they were called Speed Kits. There was a crude B/W trade magazine called mopedmart where you could find and buy these kits made by "Zeta" My parents were shocked that I was running a moped tuning shop out of the garage. The parts came from New Zealand but they would not ship to the US so I had them sent to my friend who moved to Toronto because IBM made them move very common in the 80's 90's. He cleaned up the package and mailed them to me haha. I eventually got in a lot of trouble DOT violations, illegal trade, etc they made me wait for 18 months to get a car license. good thing I was 15 years old when this happened -now I'm a boring 45YO.

    Attached Files:

  5. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Good to see you again BandBguy, together with your Aero that Pusch is a dinger,- and a kwacker too, nice collection. We each have many ‘collectables’ that hold memories of life’s good times, in my younger days I spent more time under cars (and bikes) than in them - friends would say “jim’s got his gloves on again” referring to my often oil impregnated hands, those WERE the days but it seldom happens now that I’ve reached 82, many were the days when working on engines and machinery in general that income generated would be used to accumulate flying hours towards my PPL (private airplane licence), days brought to a close when I first had severe angina attacks in the mid nineties which have since progressed to two heart attacks which are currently held in check by eight stents but also a weaker body. Part of my life was spent as a firefighter for 28-1/2 years, a great contrast to what my life is today - but there you go!

    I still haven’t parted with any of my bikes - they are all road worthy (cept one) and just beg to be ridden.

    Jim

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  6. Fiftygrit

    Fiftygrit Been here awhile

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    Morning Red and Scooterboy, just in case you peek in.
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  7. bmwloco

    bmwloco Long timer

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    Still here too... and Sacrabeo marches on. Only adds have been synthetic two stroke oil (Motul), air in the tires, and gas. I'm amazed the belt hasn't popped and the Pirelli's on it still have great tread!
  8. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I wish Red or Scootrboi would pop in and make at least one post to let everybody know they are ok. I understand their getting tired of social media. But they have each other and lots of stuff to do. I am divorced and my kids are grown, plus being disabled, I spend a lot of time at home. I don't mess with facebook, so forums are about my only contact with the outside world.

    That yellow moped is a JC Penny Pinto. The engine was built by Puch, the rest of it was made by a company called Kromag. Nobody knows much about them, even on the Moped Army site. It has always been one of my favorites because of it's looks.

    I'd replace the belt on that Scarabeo. It's no fun to have a belt break even if you are only a few miles from home. You have to get it back somehow. The belt is the weak point in a CVT transmission.

    I bought a brand new Ninja 250 back in 2007. I would up selling it to get a new Vino 125. I should have kept it a while longer. It was a very fun bike, and I was in better condition back then. I could ride it 100 miles wit very little pain, take a break and ride it another 100 miles back home. And I live right next to the end of a perfect 100 mile long sport bike road. You could have tons of fun and never break the speed limit.

    I have contemplated selling off most of my fleet of bikes because I ride them so little, and it's only going to get worse. But Squar has a point. I have room to keep them, and I like having them around. Once gone it would feel like an important part of my life was gone, and you can't buy bikes like I have any more. They no longer make them. Seven bikes, not a single one of them has a computer.
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  9. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Eye, bikes were real bikes in those days, ‘puters hardly existed, even motorcycle ‘repair shops’ were few and far between encouraging us impecunious guys to learn how to Do It Ourselves and look after our own bikes like they were Ofspring.
    Most of today’s bikes like most cars, run on computers and make it extremely difficult to do home maintenance on them hence many folk scream at repair shop costs and associated repair times but this is today’s world....
    We HAVE TO personally care for our ‘classic’ bikes because most - or at least many repair shops only recognise computerised bikes with repair tasks guided by specialist shop manuals to the exclusion of our classics of which they have minimal knowledge. Our knowledge, built up over many years is mostly locked up in our minds and could die with us - unless we can encourage younger generations to develop an interest.


    Jim
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  10. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    While some things are better today, we have lost an awful lot. Many feel that not having to do things themselves is good. I don't think so. Some of us actually like to ride and drive and do our own work. When I was in school, they taught us how to write and do math on paper. Now it is typing and math using calculators. It works, until these computers fail, and nobody knows how to fix them. A certain auto manufacturer just recalled well over half a million vehicles that were equipped with a computer controlled system to automatically apply the brakes if it detected anything ahead. But the system failed, and would apply the brakes for no reason, causing several accidents. And this sort of thing is only going to get worse, much worse. We are heading into science fiction territory, where one day computers may be able to control us. Just look at those two Boeing 737 Max crashes. The pilots fought the computer all the way to the ground. Everybody on board died.

    I don't see younger people ever becoming interested in normal bikes and cars. The few enthusiasts left wouldn't know a carburetor if they had it in their hand. They now use electronic tuners and computers to work on their vehicles. And those vehicles are becoming more and more dependent on computers. It's not just EFI anymore. Computers are taking over all kinds of functions that the rider/driver is supposed to be doing.

    I don't like being old, but at least I will be able to live the rest of my life without having to deal with this crap. I wish I had been born about 30 years earlier.
  11. CMS

    CMS Been here awhile

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    Red, I'm having withdrawal symptoms, you have to post, quickly,
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  12. oldhippie1

    oldhippie1 Been here awhile

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    Squar---The bike with the MH 64 on the license plate behind your Helix. Is it a BMW? By the way your Helix looks super nice. I have two as you know. A 94 I bought new and an 01 with 7030 miles.
  13. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Oldhippie - nay that is my 1952 Sunbeam S8 (shaft drive) # XMH 864, it’s a lovely bike that I’ve had for more than 50 years, its licenced and ready to just jump on and go, comfort gave way to speed in those days where it’s max was around 60 mph, today one cruises it around 50 mph and it’s exhaust just burbles away quietly- its a real Gentleman’s cruiser, glad you like it, occasionally I attach a photo of it taken a few years ago when I made some improvements including fitting a hydraulic operated clutch (making it a one finger operation), fitting Quartz halogen lighting front and rear and indicators for more safety in modern traffic; the whole bike is original steel - no firerglass replica parts anywhere, paintwork is original black stove enamel, while fitting the hydraulic clutch I took the opportunity to upgrade the light switching to a combined unit with the hydraulic clutch lever mounted on the left h/bar, so far as I’m aware it’s the only Sunbeam so modded, it could easily be returned to original cable operation along with associated stiffness if one felt a dire need but I wouldn’t change a thing.

    The Helix I love and am bringing it back to as near original as I can having already renewed many parts damaged by a previous owner, I have one major jobbie outstanding which is to renew the motor hangar and its rubbers with a replacement unit bought from the States a while back, hopefully this will rectify the present heavy vibration that is present at all speeds. - Its a ‘ROUNTUIT’ Job I hope to do as soon as I can get topside of my chronic heart failure condition that has bugged me for so long, - recently had two additional coronary stents fitted ( total now 9! ) which has reduced my chest pain to almost zero so here’s hoping.....



    Jim

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  14. oldhippie1

    oldhippie1 Been here awhile

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    Squar your Sunbeam is awesome. Not many around. Your doing great with your Helix. Wish I had your mechanical skills. I change belt, oil, clean screen, change tires, rebuilt carb, adj valves, rebuilt clutch but that's about the extent of my skill. Hope your health improves. Aren't you about 80 years old? Phil
  15. Fiftygrit

    Fiftygrit Been here awhile

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    You need a nice green S7 to match that S8 ,very nice shape, the gentlemans ride.
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  16. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Hi Oldhippie (Phil), Thanks for the compliments, age was actually 82 in October last but I wish I was much younger and free of the health problems that now beset me. I have become so attached to the Sunbeam that it’s loss would create an unfillable hole in my life.

    You’re doing well with your Helix(s) they’re a great machine and worth looking after, I certainly would never part with mine which had 30,000+ miles when I bought it just over a year ago, I should have persevered with my original Helix bought in 1989 and sorted out its problem of falling to the left when the bars were let go, instead I sold it with just 7,000 miles on it about 5 years ago.

    Jim
  17. oldhippie1

    oldhippie1 Been here awhile

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    82 is no spring chicken. Your getting up there. I hope I make 82. Phil
  18. Squar

    Squar Jim

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    Up until about 4 years ago I felt fine and could do most jobs around the home including climbing ladders to do roof jobs, since my heart attacks which began in 2014 I’ve gone steadily down hill to the present where I can just about walk 100 yds - but one time only which tires me for the day, I am hoping for the day when I feel good enough to work in the garage like I used to.

    To me ageing is very unwelcome bringing with it all the problems I could do without. Value your health Phil its the best thing anyone can have.

    Jim
  19. Dan V.

    Dan V. Been here awhile

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    Jim, I know nothing about the UK for the most part. I have been watching this show called "travels by narrowboat" or something like that. I was unaware that that the UK has these canals that allow one to boat all about the country. I recall you mentioning your boat - so did you travel by canal or some other waterway?

    Was thinking that the narrowboat going from city to city just needed a 'ped or small bike to visit the cities when moored along the canals. Would be such an amazing adventure.
  20. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Jim, I am 60, and have been plagued with medical issues for more that 10 years. I have more than a dozen different medical conditions. Only three of them could actually be fatal if not cared for properly, but the rest make my life miserable. I watch my 73 year old ex father in law doing things I can only dream of doing. The conditions that prevent me from doing a lot of things I want to do and used to love doing continue to get worse. I doubt I will make it to 82, I'm not sure I want to if I have to be in a wheelchair or lay in a bed in a nursing home. Befoore I wound up in this condition I was very physically active. I do my best to stay positive, but it is difficult sometimes. My oldest daughter comes over to visit every once in a while, complain about the motorcycles and scooters in the house, and helps me with housework. I have a friend and former coworker I have known since I was 18 come over once in a while and help me with yardwork. You take care of yourself. Jerry