The KTM 690 Enduro Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. JoeMongo

    JoeMongo ¿Por dónde? Supporter

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    I believe that the rubber on the CS sprocket is only to reduce sound to more easily pass regulatory requirements. It has nothing to do with "driveline shock". That's what the cushdrive is for.
    j.
  2. francs

    francs Been here awhile

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    On 2008:
    14 do accelerate wear, but it's not kritical.
    No issues with the 48 and the chain guide (guide on lower position) .
    I did reuse the bolts.
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  3. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Yep, I've always understood the rubber on the CS helped reduce drive by noise db when they test those sound levels. Bikes existed for ever w/o that rubber before that lower sound level requirement.
  4. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Sounds like 15/48 - 116 link is what I'm looking for. Thanks everyone!
  5. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Is the reason to use OEM front sprocket because it's precise fitment that aftermarket might not have?

    And are there any of those issues found on the rear, say I use JT steel sprockets?
  6. NoelJ

    NoelJ Long timer

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    That's the reason. The thickness is critical to achieve a proper seal on the shaft. The rear is just a sprocket, any decently made one is fine.
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  7. Sweedegravel

    Sweedegravel Ridefulness

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    I run 15/48 gearing on my MY-14 690E. Of all the mods I’ve done this is by far the best one. This gearing puts the bike in its ”power sweet spot” IMO. Predictable and controlled 3rd gear power wheelies over crests etc...great fun...
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  8. Oddfellow

    Oddfellow Beasty Rider Supporter

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    I just redid my sprockets and chains and went to a 16t on the front. I did the OEM KTM damp d one and am happy with the result. I tend to “tour” in Mexico and the 65-75mph range is now very smooth with the 16t. Haven’t really found it to be too tall for off road adventures. I tended to be feathering a 15t a lot and it translates well to a 16t. YMMV.
  9. Trailryder42

    Trailryder42 Long timer

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    I imagine a 16 tooth allows you to stay in first gear longer, letting you ride at a more comfortable pace thru technical stuff than what you can do in 2nd with a 15 tooth. Guess I'll have to order one, tho I don't think my wheel/axle will go any further forward in the swingarm.

    I have not found in the owners nor shop manual a spec for # of chain links in the stock chain of my 2020, but I see 116 thrown around a lot. I may have to break the chain and throw in a master link.
  10. mtbdemon

    mtbdemon Long timer

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    New to me 690 2017. I need a decent rear rack for the occasional item and perhaps my giant loop bad. Any recommendations?
  11. Stephen

    Stephen Long timer Supporter

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    I have heard that OEM are more precise width (as mentioned), more precise fit to splines (reducing slamming and wear) and softer than countershaft--thus wearing the sprocket instead of the shaft. I don't know that any of this is true, but I do recall some aftermarket outfits claiming longer life than OEM. I'd rather sacrifice the sprocket.

    On the 950, I went a tooth smaller, still OEM yet no rubber on it. Didn't sound any different. Certainly made for a better riding motorcycle. I bought an aftermarket rear sprocket only because it was all that was available when I replaced the chain. The first one's holes were in the wrong places. Got a different brand and it was fine. Have to say that the experience pushed me towards just getting the KTM parts, if only to save the bother. Not much difference in money. I've found that a really good chain is worth what it costs. And holy moly modern chains amaze me. A modern chain on the motorcycles I started on would have outlasted the bikes.
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  12. Trailryder42

    Trailryder42 Long timer

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    I always ran the OEM Sunstar CS sprocket on my old XR400 because of the slop in CS spline mesh of the cheaper aftermarket options. Being able to cock the sprocket a slight bit on the shaft is normal but there should be little to no rotational slop between sprocket and shaft splines.
  13. moto74

    moto74 displaced

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    Perun Moto rear rack IMO. My GL Coyote sits over the fuel cap but using ROK pack straps means quick to access then button back up.
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  14. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    I use a SWMotek one. But I just carry a rotopax and a tail bag on top of it. I had a Nomadic for a few years, but it broke due to too much weight and bad bumps.

    As to "feathering". I thought that was one did to get the revs up on a hard section when you are geared too high. I don't understand how going to a larger countershaft sprocket would help that.
    But maybe feathering means something different.
  15. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    Really happy with my Perun rear tail rack.
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  16. Trailryder42

    Trailryder42 Long timer

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    Your thinking is right.

    For the slow speed technical stuff I've ridden so far on this 690 with the stock 15/46 gearing, for the speed and rpms I try to keep it in, first gear runs out too soon so I shift to 2nd. 1st can also be too twitchy throttle-wise. To ride more of a proper speed thru that terrain, 2nd gear requires constant feathering of the clutch to keep the rpms where they need to be, but not ride too fast for the conditions. My thinking is that the higher gearing in 1st with a 16 would allow me to stay in 1st longer before it runs out, letting me get closer to the proper speed I want to ride the terrain at, less twitchy throttle response compared to 1st with a 15, and without having to constantly feather the clutch like I have to in 2nd.

    It's something I'm going to have to experiment with. It may all become a mute point once I install my Rekluse. We'll see.
  17. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    I can't imagine using a 16/45(46) in anything but smooth dirt roads & paved roads. I have a different bike for the easy stuff. When things get more challenging I find stock 15/45 to not be low enough in 1st to ride smoothly.

    This is where I feather the clutch and a 16 would be alot worse.
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  18. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Thanks. I'll stick with the oem 15t one then.
  19. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite Supporter

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    16/45 with Rekluse is great for the speeds/riding you've described.
    Some go the other direction, with smaller bikes for harder stuff. Personally can't understand why anyone would want to ride one of these porkers like a dirtbike.
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  20. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    I kind of agree. If I am going on a primarily tough dirt bike ride I take the 500.

    But I use the 690 on long trips that I plan myself. I try to include about 20 miles of fairly challenging stuff in a 200 mile ride day. The stock gearing works fine for me over the range of pavement, easy dirt, medium dirt, and hard dirt segments in the course of a normal day.

    I rarely if ever feather the clutch in 2nd gear, normally just downshift. I had a KLR before the 690. There was a big spacing between 1st and 2nd. I had to be really rapped out in first before shifting on a steep uphill and when I did 2nd would be too low rpm to get the job done.