The Long Way Home.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Where's Harold?, Apr 5, 2021.

  1. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Sunday, July 15th - Monday, July 16th

    The town of Ciudad del Este is a frontier town where a lot of smuggling and goods are sold, this is also the point of entry for guns entering Brazil.

    This made the town the best place for us to get parts changed on our bikes, I ended up buying some tires and a chain kit. We luckily had Gordines, a member of Abutre's MC who took us around and even brought us to his favorite burger joint ($2). After a bit of organizing and repairs, we were ready to hit Iguazu Falls tomorrow. A different kind of relaxation.

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    The falls were amazing, from the animals to the beautiful landscapes. The Iguazu falls are located in the center of three countries Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay, but to really see the falls you want to go through the Argentine side since they offer you a better view of the falls, access to a bigger park, and more waterfalls as well.

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    In the park, the walks to reach each landmark were long, but the monkeys and coatimundi gave me something to shoot as I polished my photography skills. After a lot of exploring, we left the park, but not before seeing signs warning us to not drive less than 60 kph. Pumas & jaguars lurked in the forest en route to the park. We sped off. We didn’t want to risk being an animal’s next meal.

    We were able to get more of those $2 burgers, and in the process I almost got arrested after running to the currency exchange before they closed. The cops there were overzealous, yelling at me for being a foreigner and even pulling a gun at one point. I got out of there before I became the star of an episode of Locked Up Abroad.
    #41
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  2. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Tuesday, July 17th

    Current Location: Abutre’s MC; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay

    Destination: Choppero’s MC; Asuncion, Paraguay

    Sebastian T. and I headed out to place the tires and chain kit on my bike. Upon arriving, I saw that the mechanics were younger than I was. But, they knew their way around a bike. They changed everything for me, and even threw in an oil change. The total was $78 dollars for parts and labor.

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    After that, we all decided to head out to Asuncion and stay with our friends at Chopperos MC. My bike felt so much smoother now that my tires had more grip, and we began flying to the next town. We even attracted the attention of the cops, who continually called the next town to stop us, but we passed through by the time they got the news. It wasn't until a few towns over that they got smart and called a few towns ahead. They put up a roadblock for us.

    The officers immediately took all of our papers and passport and we seemed to be in a world of trouble. That was until one of the officers saw my helmet cam, and warned his partner about me recording them (my camera battery had died). The officers immediately gave us our papers and let us be on our way. The fear of catching them trying to extort us helped us in the end.

    We arrived at 9 pm to Asuncion to a great BBQ where we were able to relax and regroup. The plan was to leave tomorrow, but I doubted it since we always felt rude and awkward leaving after one night, especially when they wanted to show us a good time and have a banquet. I still had 2,600 kms before Cusco, and about a week before Nicole arrived. So, time wasn’t really on my side.
    #42
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  3. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Wednesday, July 18th

    I realized we weren’t making good time because we always took advantage of the great hospitality, and stayed longer than we thought. So, I decided to suggest some to the Galera da Estrada. I thought our best course of action was to camp outside and leave as soon as we woke up every morning. It would allow us to make the most of our time on the road.

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    For now, we all just hung out for most of the day in a mechanic named Chappie’s garage, which was full of bikes, we rode them around and posed with some guns he had. Unbeknownst to us, Chappie had a surprise for the group. He brought two prostitutes for all of us. I was gonna see Nicole soon, so I had no interest whatsoever in being with those women. But, what did strike me as weird was the fact that the women immediately hated me once they found out I was born in America. Something so insignificant could make people look or act differently around you.

    It began to show me how pointless nationality and race were. If I was born in Japan, they'd say I was Japanese. But, in America you are from whatever country your parents come from. So, in America I am Colombian. But, in South America everyone makes it a point to remind me that I am American and not Colombian. It was confusing sometimes, what people considered race or nationality in different parts of the world.



    Thursday, July 19th - Friday, July 20th

    Current Location: Choppero's MC; Asuncion, Paraguay

    Destination: Some gas station; Argentina

    We decided to set out and enter Northern Argentina since the route to Bolivia through Paraguay was rough, and would eat everyone's tires up, all except mine since I had the only dual sport bike. We opted for the smoother ride, and more beautiful plains.

    The Argentinian border guard said I couldn’t enter because I didn’t have a notarized copy of my mission, aka my route. But, she let me through once she said I was simpatico. Now, Spanish is my first language, but sometimes words escape me. I thought she meant I was sympathetic, but in Spanish it means attractive. I guess good looks can benefit you in times of need. Not long after, we drove to a gas station to rest.

    Once we set up our camp, we met two Argentines traveling in an RV. It grew cold, and we were able to keep warm with them since our tents didn't have much insulation. They smoked as well, so we just stayed there and spoke about our trips. Before going to bed, I gave them some weed since they had none, and we went to prepare for the long day ahead (Day 1- No shower).

    In the morning we woke to the rain falling hard on our tents, and we packed quickly. We hit the road, and in the rush I didn’t tank up. I thought I could do it at the next station. I was so wrong.

    I ended up running out of gas in the middle of nowhere. Luckily, Sebastian T. was able to push me to the town over where there was a gas station. We were on the homestretch until we noticed something weird about the road. There weren’t speed bumps, but the roads did have deep dips. Before we knew it, Sebastian T. had pushed me into this dip, sending me flying and snapping my back luggage base. Now I had no gas, a broken base, and on top of that the gas station only accepted cash.

    I ran around the small town trying to sell American money to someone. That's when I met Davila, who was astounded by the sight of the new $50 bill. He changed it for 1300 Argentine pesos, which allowed me to tank up my bike and even buy some rope to tie down my luggage.

    We drove closer to the border and ate before camping outside of another gas station 5 km from the Bolivian border. Tomorrow, we would enter country number six and get that much closer to Cusco (Day 2- No shower).
    #43
  4. BuiltnotBought

    BuiltnotBought Perpetual Project

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    495
    Location:
    Ontario
    You sir it seems have had a heck of an experiece. I can honestly say I've never seen a South American ride report like what you have done. You'll have a boatload of memories out of this trip thats for sure!
    #44
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  5. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    Keep it coming. I seem to be subscribed to this one.
    #45
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  6. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Saturday, July 21st

    Current Location: Some gas station; Argentina

    Destination: Abandoned bus station; Tarija, Bolivia

    We woke up and didn't have to travel far to reach the border. The guys began having problems since they didn't have their route notarized by the Bolivian Embassy prior to arriving, but were still let through. I thought the worst was behind us until the border agent denied me entry into the country. Her reason: I couldn't have a motorcycle with a different nationality than myself, even if I had proof of purchase and a notarized paper from the owner allowing me to exit the country on the bike that I bought with my own money.

    She told me my only option was to turn around and go through Chile to enter Peru. I never felt like throwing up so much before. I walked up to the guys to let them know the bad news, and my voice began to crack. I gave up. But, they said to keep moving forward. We'd still try entering the country, and would handle any situation as it presented itself. It was the first time I had ever entered a country illegally, so I was expectedly scared and nervous.

    We reached the first checkpoint, and after Daniel A. & Daniel P. passed with no problems, Daniel P. hopped off his bike and handed me the papers for it. I was the last in line to be checked by the border police, and I handed him the papers. The officer only gave them a quick look over and let me pass by. Then and there, I became an illegal alien in Bolivia and I had no idea what they would do if anyone found out. But, I didn't plan to get into trouble during my short stay in Bolivia, so I thought I should be okay.

    The border town of Bermejo was our first stop. We exchanged money, and I also bought thicker gloves for the colder climate. We noticed a lot of people were chewing leaves, coca leaves. We didn’t know it at the time, but coca leaves have been used by the Andean people to not only help them keep energized, but to curb their appetite and help with elevation sickness. For only 50 cents a bag, we thought they might be useful. How useful, we had no idea.
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    After running some small errands, we were ready. We tanked up for the drive to Tarija, but in joking I asked the group if we should try hitchhiking there to save money and to relax. My luck must have been through the roof today because the first person I asked was a man named Hillario, and he agreed to take us for free. After packing five motorcycles and eight people in the back of his truck, we were off.

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    The ride was smooth until we hit another checkpoint, and then my heart dropped. This was where they would take my bike, ending my trip right there and then. They began to look at the papers of all the motorcycles, and upon reaching the last bike, they must've been tired or bored because they let us through without looking at the paperwork for…you guessed it, my bike. All we got was a $3 ticket for the driver not having a vehicle transport permit, which we paid for him once we got to Tarija. Along with thanking him, we gave him a little money for his troubles.

    It was day three of camping on the road (Day 3- No shower). We set up camp in an abandoned bus station. There we found a corner we were able to close off and stash all of our bikes, bags and tents in. It was right then and there that I realized why homeless people stuck together. Being in a group while going through hardship made the experience more bearable. We sat around our gas stove, making rice and laughing the night away.

    I know that if I were in the same situation alone, I would be scared and stressed about every noise I heard as I slept. We watched some movies on our phones, listened to music, and before we all went to sleep we even hot boxed one of the tents.

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    #46
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  7. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Sunday, July 22nd

    Current Location: Abandoned Bus Station; Tarija, Bolivia

    Destination: Fernando Sarmiento; Potosi, Bolivia

    I started my day early and went in search of a mechanic to fix my luggage (I was afraid it would fall off any minute). I passed three shops that were all out of business, and it being Sunday didn't help my cause. Then, I found one called Moto Mendez. But, it ended up being a residential house. It turned out to be the owner's house, who at first said he couldn't help me. But, after telling him my story he was more than eager to help a friend in need.

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    He didn't have any new parts, but he did suggest that we fix it MacGyver style, to which I agreed and left the rest in his hands. The man left me in his home while he went to find screws and bolts to help fasten the base. Then we took two pieces of scrap metal to provide the base reinforcement. We worked on the bike and we spoke about his love for motorcycles as well his plans to hit the road in the future. I encouraged him to do so. Some people may not know it, but there is a lot of support for motorcyclists on the road. I myself had no clue until I hit the road and began meeting people who connected me with help along the way. That was what I never expected, the camaraderie amongst people who shared a common interest: traveling on a motorcycle.

    After Juan finished, I asked him the cost and he said it was free of charge. Before I left, I thanked him and exchanged information with him so that I could help him out in case he hit the road one day. I returned to camp where everything was packed and ready for us to hit the town of Potosi.

    The landscapes of Bolivia were very alien. As I drove I felt like I was on a different planet exploring new frontiers. En route, we all got separated because some of us went faster than others, and the elevation affected our carburetor bikes differently than the fuel injection one Sebastian T. had.

    I was the first one to Potosi, but since I couldn't get in contact with any of the guys I assumed they went ahead. So I did too. It wasn’t until after I contacted them that I realized my mistake and headed back to Potosi where I met up with Sebastian T. and Diego. We began driving around trying to see if we could find any of the other guys, but we saw none of them. We did find a french woman named Melusine who was also traveling like us, but alone. She blew us away with her huge bike. It had stickers and patches of places she had been to. She visited Africa, Europe, and was heading to the Uyuni salt flats before heading to Mexico.

    It was the perfect chance encounter because right after we finished talking to her, we turned around and saw Willy drive past us. He had just arrived, and had an extremely rough day. His chain popped, and he was forced to walk 7 km to the next town and then return to his bike later to fix it. Now, this wasn't an easy task since the people in Bolivia are a bit cold towards foreigners, so he had to beg people to sell him something since their stores were closed.

    Unbeknownst to us, the rest of the guys had found a place to stay already, which understandably made the rest of us who were frantically trying to contact them a bit mad since we were in the cold while they were nice and warm. After the long day, some of us were miserable. But, our host Fernando fixed all that. Once we got some food in us, we felt better (we were running on fumes). I was so tired. Maybe it was from the elevation, but I was too lazy to shower. So, I guess it became day 4: no shower. That would be the last day of the streak…I hoped.
    #47
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  8. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Monday, July 23rd

    Current Location: Fernando Sarmiento; Potosi, Bolivia

    Destination: Lobo Oruro MC; Oruro, Bolivia

    Last night was extremely cold, I didn't sleep even though I was so exhausted. At some point, I even began to wander around the house until I found some huge thick blankets that I cocooned myself into to finally be able to get some rest.

    Once we all woke up, we went to get food. All except for one of us Daniel A., who was on the ground and couldn't seem to get up. It wasn't until Fernando saw him that he knew what it was; elevation sickness. He was the only one of the group who didn't chew coca leaves. With us being in one of the highest cities in the world, it hit him hard. We gave him some coca tea, and he felt a bit better. But, it was taking too long.

    At this rate, I wouldn’t make it to Cusco before Nicole did. So, I told the guys I was going to go ahead of them to stay on schedule. Our host, Fernando, even connected me with his friends, the Lobos Oruro MC in Oruro, Bolivia. I left at 3-ish and arrived at 9 pm.

    They accepted me with open arms. We drank and chewed coca leaves through the night. It got late and before I hit the hay we celebrated the birthday of one of their members. We showered him with flour and cracked eggs on his head. I would've kept the party going with them, but I had a 15-hour drive ahead of me the next day. That was all that stood between me and Nicole. I was asleep by 2am.


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    Current Location: Lobos Oruro MC; Oruro, Bolivia

    Destination: Nicole Ramirez; Cusco, Peru

    In the morning, I set off to the Bolivia/Peru border. I was so nervous. I had made it up to this point with no problems, but I had still entered the country illegally. The border guard himself was really confused because he couldn't find stamps or even paperwork for me or the bike. My lucky break was when he said, "since you’re leaving my country it's not my problem.” He passed my papers to his friend from the Peruvian border, and I was good to go.
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    I ran around a bit as I changed some currency and got a bite to eat before the final stretch to Cusco. I was worried about getting to Cusco by 10pm. Once I entered Puno, I had 3 hours left, but it was in complete darkness. All the twists and turns, and the high beams of oncoming traffic made the last leg of the drive grueling.

    Then, as I was closing in on Cusco, only 20 minutes before I was to meet up with Nicole, I got hit by a car. I was behind a truck. It began to drive to the right side of the road, and I took that as my chance to pass him on the left. Almost immediately, the truck made a hard left and sent me flying. Time seemed to go slow as I flew through the air, thinking of two things:

    1. I was a goner.

    2. My mother was going to kill me even though I was already dead

    I hit the ground, and was relieved to still be alive. But, now the fear of having something broken set in. I began to flex my body, and after feeling no immediate pain I picked up my bike and kept moving forward. The other driver was nowhere to be seen, so laying around waiting for help didn't seem useful.

    I drove the rest of the way with bent handlebars, but I made it safely. It had been a sixteen-hour drive, and I arrived at 11pm with a swollen pinky, hip, and arm. The Airbnb Nicole was staying in was extremely difficult to find. After another fall, I finally found it. I was bruised, battered, and bleeding, but not defeated I made it to Nicole.

    She ran to the door and gave me a huge hug, and we kissed. After so long without her, I was happy to finally have her there with me. I was even a day ahead of schedule. I could relax. No more long drives, just Nicole and I taking it slow.
    #48
  9. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Wednesday, July 25th - Thursday, 26th

    Current Location: Nicole Ramirez; Cusco, Peru 23FF90A7-4B68-490A-B2B6-53D2A0650C41.jpeg

    The next day, the adrenaline wore off and my entire body was in pain. I could barely walk, so we took it slow the next few days as I healed. Since I couldn’t really hike anywhere, we ended up doing the next best thing; eating. We had alpaca, cuy (guinea pig), vegan food, Peruvian food, candy and drank beer.
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    One of our favorite things Nicole and I did together was go eat at new places. It was almost like I never left and after almost three months of not seeing each other, we were a couple of lovebirds on the road. I especially loved seeing her familiar face in an unknown place. She planned to travel with me for a while, so now I needed to find saddle bags to make room for all of us. I also had to fix my bike after last night’s accident. I couldn’t risk her getting hurt.

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    #49
    rudy4pl, Spigatelli and knight like this.
  10. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    I'm glad to hear/ read that you are okay, if battered and bruised after your crash. Never overtake trucks that are turning.. ... they need so much room that they may turn the opposite way to what they first appear to be going.
    I can remember shouting in my helmet at a riding companion not to overtake the slowing milk tanker in dairy farming country. There was no way he would have heard me, and he got lucky, he overtook the truck with about 50cm to spare before it would have hit him.
    #50
  11. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Yeah, I learned my lesson brother. Luckily, I am resilient.
    #51
  12. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Friday, July 27th

    We moved into our new Airbnb, and I also found a mechanic to help me out. A man named Danny Marquez really lent me a hand, from fixing the bent tire rods to changing broken parts. In the end, he only charged me $60 for all the help. It was a godsend. The next day was going to be a holiday, so Danny moved fast to make sure everything was ready to go, even going as far as hitting up other friends to help us out. I felt bad for him having to rush, so I told him his help was enough, and to not kill himself trying to fix it fast.

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    Regardless, there was no rush because the next day Nicole and I were going to Winicunca Mountain, aka Rainbow Mountain. It would be my first real hike since the accident.


    Saturday, July 28th

    We got up at 4am to wait for our pickup to take us to Rainbow Mountain. They were a bit late, but we made up for lost time. The drive was long and bumpy. It was cloudy, and loud with children screaming and jumping all over the place. After two hours, we finally stopped and were able to stretch while we had breakfast. Then, we rolled back out.

    The last hour was full of beautiful mountains and overrun with llamas, causing traffic for us when no other cars were around. When we arrived, the hard part had begun, now we had to go up this mountain. The walk wasn't steep, but the elevation was what hit you. Every step felt heavy and if you spoke even a little, you were out of breath before you knew it.
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    Nicole began vomiting and had to stop occasionally because of the altitude. I was also feeling it, but since I was chewing coca leaves the effects weren't as rough. When she took a break, I offered her some coca leaves but they didn't help her much. So many people were riding up the mountain, but for us riding a horse was out of the question.

    We thought that reaching the top by horse made the whole ordeal less of an accomplishment. Sometimes you have to go through hardships, to appreciate the accomplishment that much more.
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    Once we reached the top, it was all worth it. The beautifully colored mountains were capped with snow, and the llamas made the whole hike worthwhile. I went crazy as I photographed rams, lambs, alpacas, and a condor. The fact that something like this existed on this Earth was breathtaking, literally. And just like we thought, the people who went up on horse did not appreciate it as much since most of them immediately went back down once they reached the top.
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    On the other hand, Nicole and I explored more than anyone else in our group, and we almost got left behind. As cold as it was, we left with a sunburn and our legs felt like jelly. But, it was all worth it. Now, it was time to prepare for Machu Picchu, the reason most people come to Peru in the first place. To say I was excited was an understatement.

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    #52
  13. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    WOW! A condor! I've been fascinated by those magnificent birds since first reading about them as a kid nearly 50 years ago.
    I'm envious.
    Keep us updated.
    #53
  14. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    It was a sight to behold for sure. There were times that I was driving and tearing up. It was literally heaven on earth but sometimes we are too busy or distrcted to notice.
    #54
  15. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Monday, July 30th

    We messed up big time. Machu Picchu was in the busy season and all of the morning spots were booked. But, we couldn’t go to Cusco and not visit Machu Picchu, that's like having sex with out kissing. You’re missing the best part. Instead of wasting time, we explored Cusco.
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    The good news was that the Colombians arrived in Cusco that day. Well, only four did: Daniel P., Daniel A., Sebastian, and Andres. The other three Willy, Diego, and Sebastian T. were already en route back to Colombia. Since we split up in Potosi, we had all been through hell. Sebastian T. and Diego had chains pop while they drove, and almost couldn't fix it. Willy ran over a dog & crashed, only to be robbed by the people who came to help him. Daniel A's radiator cracked, and Andres had motor trouble. Luckily, we were all in one piece.

    I decided to meet up with the remaining four after Nicole went to bed. We caught up and ate pizza. But, as we went to pay, a worker there named Jhon approached us and offered to pay for our meal. He said that if we needed any help to let him know. I mentioned Machu Picchu, and he said that his brother worked for an agency and could help us out. We might be in luck!


    Tuesday, July 31st


    Nicole and I took it slow because she had to get a replacement passport (she lost hers), and I had to go pick up the bike from Danny. I also went in search of saddle bags to make our trip more comfortable. Once we finished all of our errands, we decided to hit up the Sacred Valley where we took photos and laid by the riverbed. It's crazy how the world can make you feel so small and insignificant, but it’s also a beautiful thing to experience these moments together.

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    At night, we returned to Cusco to get Nicole’s photo for her passport. We enjoyed the rest of our night with a nice smoke session and a great meal at one of the restuarants in the square.

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    Who's Kid is this?!

    Wednesday, August 1st

    Jhon's brother, Edgar gave me a call as soon as he read my message about Machu Picchu. He wasted no time in telling us the schedules and spots that were available. We could get in an afternoon slot to see the ruins with his agency, and still be brought back the same day. That was perfect because we were already itching to leave Cusco, we just couldn't without seeing Machu Picchu.

    Thursday, August 2nd

    We woke up early to be picked up for the ride to Machu Picchu. It was also my mother’s birthday, so I had to call her and wish her the best on her day. I was glad we took a bus because as we got closer, the roads got crazier and there were no barriers on the sides, so you could easily slide off the mountain.
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    WHO'S KID IS THIS?!

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    The bus left us at the hydroelectric plant where we had to walk almost three hours to get to the town of Aguas Calientes, the town closest to Machu Picchu. The walk was a bit tiring, but as usual the views made it all worthwhile. We arrived at 5:30pm, just in time to meet our guide and have dinner. Then, we got our key and checked into our room. We were still eager to explore the town, so we headed out to eat more and grabbed a drink. At night, we made love and got ready for the early climb up to Machu Picchu the next day.

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    Before I went to sleep, I got a call from my mother who told me that my grandma was going into emergency surgery because she had an infection from an earlier procedure. What a birthday my mom was having. I wished I could have cheered her up. She deserved to be happy, especially on her birthday.
    #55
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  16. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    This is quite the adventure, keep it coming.
    By the way:
    I'm confused by this "popping the chain" you mention. I've had a chain break years ago after I inadvertently mounted the front sprocket ther wrong way around causing the chain to be a long way out of alignment.
    I've also seen one jump off after the inexperienced (and unlicenced international) rider rode it from Sydney New South Wales, to Erldunda Northern Territory, in Australia without lubricating it, causing the dry chain to twist and jump off. The only other cause I can think of it the chain so loose due to stretching that it can jump off.
    A bike chain needs to be loose enough to allow the suspension to fully compress, but not so loose that it will jump off the sprockets due to normal flexing.
    #56
  17. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    The stray kids in your pics reminded me of some of the family photos taken when my brothers and I got together with our then young families. There would be at least one family group pic with a child that didn't belong to any of us or our friends or in-laws who's been invited along.
    Photo bombed by a complete stranger, and a small child at that.
    #57
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  18. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    It was so tight that it popped and they had to MacGuyver it with some chain master links in the middle of Peru, until they got a new chain. Could've been that they didn't lubricate it too, hahaha.
    #58
  19. Where's Harold?

    Where's Harold? Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    New York
    Friday, August 3rd

    Despite the cloud that started to hang over my head, Machu Picchu was surely a sight to behold. The pictures don't do it justice. You just have to visit this place to truly understand the magnificence of the structure and its position high in the mountains.

    On the way up, we met another Harold, a German also traveling on motorcycle with his girlfriend. It was interesting to meet someone so different from me in every way, but similar in two ways: we shared a name, and the fact that we were traveling the exact same route up from Chile. The only thing was that he was turning back to Chile after getting to Ecuador.

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    HAROLD AND HAROLD​

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    The top of the hike was amazing. Nicole and I smoked a joint as we laid back and saw the clouds float above us with not a single building in sight. We even managed to take a small nap. I felt like I was in heaven laying there with Nicole.

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    The climb up was a lot steeper than Rainbow Mountain, but so much easier because there was less altitude. All of a sudden, it was 2:30pm and we began our descent to the hydroelectric plant where our bus was waiting. We arrived back in Cusco at 1am and knocked out. There was no sight of the Colombians when we returned....
    #59
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  20. JohnGK

    JohnGK Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Mackay Queensland Australia
    That sound like a lack of chain lube. The other thing that causes this is the chain being past it's use by date.
    X- ring and O- ring type sealed chains slowly leak the sealed in lube out and tighten up to the point at which the links don't swivel any more.
    Regular lubrication helps slow this process.
    #60
    Where's Harold? likes this.