The monster Monster thread! (formerly Why not a Monster)

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by JustKip, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    I'd say almost any sport touring tire will serve you well. Especially on a nimble light bike like yours.
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  2. prince_ruben

    prince_ruben Long timer

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    I say go Michelin 2ct. The dual compound tire will last, and supply the edge when you feel sporty. Strong work for keeping the M750 alive.
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  3. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I had been putting sport touring tires on mine the last couple sets - Metzeler Roadtec Z1s, which I do recommend. Problem is, the last set came off due to age and not wear, and this current set it probably going the same way. Since I don't really do long trips with that bike anymore, I will probably go back to a sportier set next time around.

    I've had Pilots in the past and was happy with them, but I'll likely put a set of Pirelli Diablo Rosso III's on for the next set.
  4. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    Thanks guys...good advice. I'm in the same boat as the existing tires have plenty of tread but I wouldn't doubt they're 10 years old.
  5. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    I wore out a set of earlier generation Rosso's in just under 2000 miles on a Monster 1200S. Replaced them with Angel GTs which worked perfectly well even at a track day. Novice group but still. I sold that bike and the tires still looked great at 2000+ miles. I have some form of Rosso's on my 851 also but they will age out before they wear out on that bike.
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  6. Oldebonz

    Oldebonz Been here awhile

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    Diablo Rossi III to replace the original tires on my 2005 800 S2R?Found it with only 800 miles,originals look perfect ,durometer( my fingernail!) leaves a mark like on my vintage road race rubber,feel fine on the road but 16 years is a long time!
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  7. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    A636D065-708F-434B-90E7-C32C26E6EF00.jpeg The obligatory "I rode today" pic. Sounds mundane but riding in Wi. in March is a rare treat.
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  8. Rick G

    Rick G Ranger Rick Supporter

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    Need advice from the Ducatistas here.

    I am looking for a bike for my Son In Law. I have the opportunity to buy a 2007 Ducati Monster 695 with only 600 miles at a very good price.. In fact the 600 mile service was never performed. It has sat unused for at least 6-8 years since current owner parked it. He is getting on with age, and is liquidating his bikes.

    So far what I know is, it is bone stock. 600 miles. Not ridden in long time. Was told he was having the tank swelling issue that I was aware of. Said some sort of fix was done, but don't know if it worked.

    I know all fluids will need to be changed including flushing the brake lines. Will need new battery and probably tires. Cables will need lubed. Gas tank drained and filled with fresh gas. Maybe run some injector cleaner.

    Now, I am not much of a tech, and will probably have a shop perform all maintenance before giving to my SIL. The price I can get this bike, will make it worth it.

    So what do the Ducati faithful say? Am I looking at major issues bringing this barely used bike back to life? What about the bike itself? Was the 695 a good bike? I know that it was only 1-2 year model before the 696. My SIL is a reentry rider so I am comfortable with the modest HP of the 695.

    I appreciate any advice.

    Thanks!

    Rick G
  9. kickstandsup

    kickstandsup Devout Atheist Supporter

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    I don't think there's anything particularly special about bringing a Duc back to life compared with any other bike that has sat that long.

    However, I'd have to dispute the "6-8 year" calculation; this is a 14 y/o bike that was ridden 600 miles, so even in the first 7 years it wasn't really "ridden" if you get my drift. You may be in for a complete fuel system rebuild; it is certainly possible the gunk is beyond any injector cleaner capability. Parts can always be replaced, just factor in the cost. Might want to ask your shop what that might be. Same is true for the brake system.

    I'd also want to be sure the motor spins and that nothing is seized, especially since the oil was never changed and the bike just parked.

    How was the bike stored? Garage, outside, shed? Rust issues? Chain replacement?

    I would absolutely replace 14 y/o tires.

    Good luck whatever you decide!

    Edit: one unique Ducati item: change the belts
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  10. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    I've owned my 750M for 20 years now, and it's been a fantastic, low maintenance motorcycle. I've only put 13,000 miles on it, and in that time it's received one valve adjust and two belt changes. I did the belts myself the 2nd time and it was way easier than I imagined. The rumors regarding Ducati's are just that...rumors. Yes, maintenance on a high strung Testastretta engine may give you sticker shock, but the regular Monster's area as easy to work on as a Honda and just about as reliable. My brother's 01 M900 Chromo has been abused as no bike should and it just keeps going at 35K+ miles. He went 25K miles without a belt change and they still looked OK when I changed them.
  11. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    That might need a ton of work to bring back. Thats a long time to sit around with gas in it, not to mention the possible tank issue.
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  12. redlabelmoto

    redlabelmoto Been here awhile

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    This will be an easy wake up. Change all the fluids. Install new timing belts and a battery. Put in fresh fuel. New spark plugs if you’re feeling fancy. Press the button.

    It has one cable. The throttle. If you wish to lube it feel free but I can guarantee it works like new right now haha. This generation doesn’t have a secondary safety return cable.

    •edit• Well actually it does have a fast idle lever that has a cable. So in fact the bike does have 2 cables. If you actually lube that we need a picture.

    I’ve been down this road with countless Ducatis. Including a Monster 695 the same year and exact same condition/mileage as the one you describe just last year. After I did the above it ran and worked like new.

    Yes the tank will be swollen. Just run it like that. Down the road buy a new one and have it coated before you put fuel in it. I have a hookup in Italy with fantastic prices on oem duc parts if you need that.

    Make sure it has keys... this generation has an immobilzer. Although nowadays even that problem can be overcome.

    Don’t listen to the naysayers just do it. The mid 2000 era Ducatis are the sweet spot for simplicity and rideability.

    87A3B044-FB81-482E-977F-1C06173E198C.jpeg
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  13. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    Best thing about a 695 is they sound just a nasty and snarly as an 1100 :ricky
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  14. Rick G

    Rick G Ranger Rick Supporter

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    Thank you for your advice. I was already thinking your way. My SIL likes to work on cars and wants to do the work himself. I trust him to do learn how to do what is needed or get done at dealer. I think I may just send him your reply.

    Rick G
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  15. redlabelmoto

    redlabelmoto Been here awhile

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    @Rick G the SIL sounds like a worthy addition to the fold. He’ll have a lot of fun. An M695 is a very simple straightforward machine. Once he has the timing belt covers off he will see how ridiculously simple it is. After watching a utube vid or 2 on changing them he will be an expert.
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  16. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    I wouldn't even spin the engine over by hand or otherwise until the timing belts were replaced. Call me paranoid, but it's not worth stuffing a valve into a piston because you got impatient. Very easy to replace the belts on the engines with that exhaust routing.

    Once the belts are new, treat it like any other bike that has sat forever, and probably dump a teaspoon of oil into each spark plug hole before you try to spin the engine.

    I'd also be worried the fuel pump and injectors might have serious problems after sitting that long -- it really depends if, when it first sat, it had gas in the tank.

    For reference, in 2019, I bought used 2015 TU250x. This is an EFI bike. It had 69 miles on it (nice), and had been sitting since 2015. After putting a new battery in it and verifying the fluids, it started ok and seemed to run ok. It wasn't until after I did the second oil change and flushed out the brake fluid, etc, that I started having serious problems with the fueling. It randomly would not start -- it would crank and crank, and it would take up to a dozen tries to get it to fire, then it would very reluctantly come to life, and before that, while cranking it was acting like there was no fuel in the cylinder at all. I treated the tank with iso-heet (water remover) and fuel injector cleaner. Continued to have the random no start problem, and then it started stalling when you tried to blip the throttle from idle. There was no visible rust in the steel tank, but the aluminum components of the fuel cap were covered in white corrosion fuzz.

    About the time I had convinced myself I needed to replace the injector and fuel pump, the various snake oils seems to eventually clear things up, but it took about 500 miles worth of gas and fuel treatments before it started running normally. However, 5000 miles later, the fuel pump doesn't sound super healthy at key-on. So, this was on a bike that sat for four years -- now imagine a twin cylinder bike that has sat for twice that long.

    Sitting without use is the enemy of every machine. Proceed with caution.
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  17. kickstandsup

    kickstandsup Devout Atheist Supporter

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    It really all depends on how much he likes his son-in-law.





    :hide
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  18. kickstandsup

    kickstandsup Devout Atheist Supporter

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  19. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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  20. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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