The New Motoguzzi V85TT vs Stelvio 1200 NTX

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Berardi3, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. Berardi3

    Berardi3 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    400
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    So went to the IMS in NYC today no show of MotoGuzzi guess they are not interested in selling any Bikes BMW GS has a Strong following.
    #41
  2. Dracula

    Dracula afficionado Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    19,722
    Location:
    Gift Shop
    Theirs is reverse psychology :lol3:photog
    [​IMG]

    my .02 cents anyway
    #42
    davyjones likes this.
  3. Hoak

    Hoak Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,180
    Location:
    Minnesota, Up Near The Arctic Circle
    I own a 2014 Stelvio NTX, did not expect to like the bike, assumed all the 'reputation ' concerning weight, and Italian reliability were true -- and all that is just a lot of FUD I expect spun by marketing companies and egophilic owners of other brand big ADV machines. For me, the Stelvio has been nothing but pleasant surprises (except for my recent crash but that wasn't the bike's fault) and an all time favorite among the many bikes I've owned.
    While I can't say for a fact, it looks to me like the V85 is more of an exercise in cost cutting and marketing then offering real deign and engineering commitment to ADV capability, so if an ADV bike is what you're looking for, compared to the alternatives like the KTM 790, Yamaha 700, and even the Suzuki Vstrom it comes up very short. If you just love Moto Guzzi motorcycles though you might love it.

    Compared to the Stelvio though the V85 for a rider like me there's just nothing there, and unless you're of very small stature, just looking for a 'standard' Moto Guzzi street bike with retro scrambler aesthetics, and mid size pretensions that it doesn't really meet, you might be disappointed as well...

    At 505 lbs wet, the V85 is only 74 lbs less then the Stelvio if you weigh them with the same amount of fuel, and the difference is smaller still if you take the panniers off the Stelvio -- probably not even 40 lbs net weight difference.

    85hp is fine, but on a 505 lb bike with any long haul or ADV aspirations it's not going to be exhilarating, and in some circumstances not even capable (two up, with loaded panniers, long haul, head wind, passing) -- you don't get even decent fuel economy for the performance penalty, and with 3 gallons less fuel capacity the V85 is going to suck if you have any ambition of long legs rides.

    Tube tires, small alternator, tapered small bore forks, goofy foo foo cosmetic affectations like a vented high front fender that doesn't need vents, weird wide thin café saddle, fork protectors that are mounted like MX bike flappy bangers -- are all the obverse of form following function; the fender and fork are going to at best cause vibration at speed, or worse instability, the seat may be comfortable for some but looks like it will terrible if you're more then 4' 5" tall, or ever intend to ride the bike off the beaten path -- all this will cost money to fix or change if you don't like it.

    By contrast the Stelvio is not a version one consumer beta, it's a mature robust design with seven years of refinement (and decades more in the powerplant and transmission) not only gets all these things done right out of the box, it offers a lot of features with real benefits you might not think about going in: really good panniers are part of the package, as are middling fog lights, the CARC that offers really supple performance for a shaft bike, single sided swing arm, and the ergonomics of the Stelvio fit a lot of people of different shapes and sizes happily.

    As well having been around for a while; all Stelvio service detail and the minor issues any motorcycle will have are very well documented and easy to take care of, and there's a sizeable aftermarket of parts and farkels to tweak the bike to match your DNA.

    That Piaggio & C. SpA/Moto Guzzi reps have said that the V85 is not the bike intended to replace or supplant the Stelvio, and that bike is still a work in progress for later release seals the deal as far as my interest in the V85. That you can still own a new Stelvio NTX for less then V85's will go for, tells me I have to get my ass in gear and save more money so I can buy a second Stelvio before they're gone.
    #43
  4. Berardi3

    Berardi3 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    400
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    Wonder if there are any new ones left out there?
    #44
  5. Hoak

    Hoak Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,180
    Location:
    Minnesota, Up Near The Arctic Circle
    There are, but if I posted it here, and someone got to all of them before me... I'd have to kill myself... :D

    I should probably add, the Stelvio is in no way a perfect motorcycle, but it just happens to do a lot of things right that are important to me in for a bike in the heavy ADV class, ymmv...
    #45
  6. Vagabond68

    Vagabond68 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2016
    Oddometer:
    40
    I’m quite content with my stable:
    2016 Stelvio NTX
    2016 V7 II Stone
    2002 V11 LeMans Tenni

    Each serves a purpose. There is significant crossover among the three but when the need calls I have a great tool for each job.
    #46
    triumphsidehack, Hoak and motrhead like this.
  7. Hoak

    Hoak Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,180
    Location:
    Minnesota, Up Near The Arctic Circle
    Nice! However, some aren't so lucky, financially endowed, or lack wife approval factor that makes owning more then one 'do-it-all ' motorcycle impractical. While not the case for me now, I've been that guy for most of my life, and empathize with the hard and practical choices many have to make.

    If it's really an ADV motorcycle someone in this situation wants, it's probably not too difficult a choice as there aren't that many bikes to choose from, and each offers definitive advantages and compromises -- making the opportunity cost equation pretty easy if your practical and honest about what you need and want.
    #47
  8. Vagabond68

    Vagabond68 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2016
    Oddometer:
    40
    Thanks! I wasn’t trying to brag about my bikes (if it came off that way) and I totally get that multiple bikes isn’t a reality for many people. I meant that since I have a variety of options now, the V85TT isn’t likely a ‘need to have’ bike.

    Speaking of which since we are in the realm of want vs need, bike selection seems a little like Miata vs Jeep Wrangler. Both are open top vehicles, can go on or off road and are otherwise not the most practical.

    If I had to pick only one, I’d need to decide (after my daily driver) which I placed greater emphasis on: off road adventures or maybe doing track days. Sure I can do track days in the Jeep or take the Miata off road but neither are ideal for those tasks.

    I guess I’m saying that each buyer has to decide which elements are MOST important to them and buy based on that. There is a lively debate in another forum over whether or not the V7 is (or can be a touring bike). The answers are from yes, absolutely - my brother rode cross country on his Vespa!, to maybe - if you can tolerate certain compromises, to no not really - that’s not it’s ‘intended purpose’.

    For someone looking for an ‘all-rounder’ the V85TT will likely be a stylish new choice among many others. As usual, it’s market will likely be those who already wanted (or have) a Guzzi as opposed to someone cross shopping a Ducati Scrambler (Desert Sled) or Triumph Scrambler. Dealer network and perceived parts availability will factor in as well.
    #48
    davyjones and Hoak like this.
  9. Hoak

    Hoak Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,180
    Location:
    Minnesota, Up Near The Arctic Circle
    No no, didn't think there was anything braggadocious in your post at all. It occurred to me that for anyone that the V85 is a better fit for any reason, one thing that will set it apart from all the alternatives (except perhaps the Stelvio) is it will be an easy bike to work on, and offer more maintenance autonomy then anything that might be considered an alternative -- something that can mean a lot to someone where pennies make dollars and every penny counts.
    #49
    dedecaster and Vagabond68 like this.
  10. Whiskey Tango

    Whiskey Tango 1*

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,054
    I'm thinking a Moto Guzzi will be my next bike; non-tubeless spoke rims are kind of a deal breaker for me.
    #50
  11. WitchCityBallabio

    WitchCityBallabio Guzzi weirdo

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,464
    Location:
    Wales, Massachusetts
    I wouldn't let the rims stop you. It's relatively easy to seal the rims and the they do have rim lock beads, so it'll work no problems.

    As an update to the original posters question...

    I have since ridden the V85. Is it a replacement for the Stelvio? Nope. Not in my opinion. The Stelvio is a tough package to beat. But, the V85 is a really nice bike. Even though as stated by Hoak only 74lbs lighter, it feels a lot lighter than that. The CofG seems much lower. It has the best fueling of any bike I've ever ridden. The clutch is so easy (compared to my Stelvio) that I thought it was broken the first time I pulled it. Power delivery is smooth and linear. It doesn't have the legs the Stelvio has, but IMHO, I don't think anyone will complain about the power. It spins up quickly and is torquey. Even though it has nearly identical specs to the Stelvio with regards to ground clearance and suspension travel, it feels half as high. The contour of the seat makes it very easy to flat foot.

    Handling is terrific. The forks could maybe be a bit better, but I didn't play around with them at all. I don't know how they managed to pull it off, but there is no shaft jacking at all. Without riding it offroad, I can't say it'll track as well as the CARC on the Stelvio or not.

    I consider the V85 a 7/8's Stelvio. I liked it. A lot.
    #51
    davyjones and Lupin 3rd like this.
  12. jwdub

    jwdub Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,251
    Location:
    SW Washington
    What is your assessment of the handlebar vibration? Talking to an owner with about 700 miles on his he states that his hands go to sleep due to vibration near and above 4k rpm. When I rode the demonstrator, I didn't perceive this increase in vibration -- so, don't know if it's his particular mc or if it's general. Also, I'm very aware of the individual nature of tolerance for certain frequency of vibration as I wasn't able to tolerate the Stelivo's.
    #52
  13. WitchCityBallabio

    WitchCityBallabio Guzzi weirdo

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,464
    Location:
    Wales, Massachusetts
    I didn't notice any major vibrations at the bars. In fact I remember thinking that it pretty much felt like all of our Guzzis, to the point, that I was very comfortable with it pretty much right away.

    Iin true Guzzi fashion, I would bet any annoying vibrations will go away or diminish in a few thousand miles as it breaks in.
    #53
  14. OtterChaos

    OtterChaos Guzzi Sud!

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,339
    Location:
    Grover Beach, Ca
    I have not noticed much vibration even at 4k. I have 900 miles on the bike including long freeway runs and no sensation of my hands falling asleep.
    #54
    twowings and TNWalker like this.
  15. Berardi3

    Berardi3 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    400
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    My Stelvio vibrates like crazy
    #55
  16. motomoda

    motomoda Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,728
    Location:
    Oz
    Well it shouldn't if it's tuned properly and isn't falling to bits.
    #56
  17. Berardi3

    Berardi3 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    400
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    was just tuned
    #57
  18. motomoda

    motomoda Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,728
    Location:
    Oz
    By someone who knows what they're doing? If so check all the mounting bolts. Thing is a correctly tuned 8V doesn't shake like a cheap sex aid unless the motor is falling out.
    #58
  19. Berardi3

    Berardi3 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    400
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    ok
    #59
  20. LazyDog

    LazyDog n00b

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    Have an 2013 NTX and rented a V85 in the UK. Both awesome- for me, Ive had bigger bikes all my life, the NTX is the ultimate do everything bike ( unless the roads get too snarly) thats where the V85 shines.. but on the road....yawn
    #60
    davyjones likes this.