The Off5icial 2015 DAKAR pre-event preparation coverage.

Discussion in 'Racing' started by troy safari carpente, Nov 19, 2014.

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  1. wingnut11

    wingnut11 generally strange

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    I'm pretty sure all the minis are diesel. I know Nani Roma drove a diesel one last year, and I can't imagine that they'd have more than one kind of engine.
  2. garfey

    garfey Scruffy Adventurer Supporter

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    From: http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1095446_eight-mini-all4-racings-to-take-on-2015-dakar-rally

  3. nry

    nry .

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    So where are all the customer / Privateer Hondas ? Lots of new KTMS, Honda not finished their bike enough to sell them yet ? Maybe 2016.



    Cesare watch.


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    :clap Man he looks happy to be :D (and mildly overawed)
  4. troy safari carpente

    troy safari carpente Team f5oolery

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    All the X-Raid MINI's have always been BMW diesel powered, as were the X3's.

    garfey gets an A+ on research. :lol3
  5. troy safari carpente

    troy safari carpente Team f5oolery

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    I know where you're coming from CBV... and your affinity for the "marathon" spirit of old; when the Paris - Dakar had it's home in the sahara etc.

    But as far as I can recall* I don't remember many Dakar's where the total selective distance exceeded the liason total distance?

    *maybe one of the early P-D's up to @ 1988...? but I can't put my finger on any definitive stats just now.

    So aside from the "exact numbers" for all of the years since 1979 (would be interesting if anyone does have them? :ear) generally, I agree that in recent years the percentage of "selective" as related to the total "rally" distance has diminished, also the nature of liason has gone from (often in Africa) desert/terrain conditions, to formed roads - even highways, linking the special stages.

    Conversely, it seems that the selectives themselves have become more technical (even if somewhat shorter) with the course planners contriving and accessing the more challenging terrain that they have available.

    Looking over the schedule and stage briefs for this year, there seems a concerted effort to make this years route/schedule quite demanding... I actually predict that THIS years DAKAR might just provide the LOWEST finishing percentage of the seven south american "El Dakaro's" to date. :ear

    I don't believe that in this day and age, it is possible to run a rally on the scale of DAKAR, over the distances and scope of geography involved and maintain more than (feasibly) 60% competitive distance, as related to the total.

    Maybe in UAE where the terrain afford the opportunity to "loop" around in relatively uninhabited corner of the desert, or (to go back to the old Master Rallye concept) across the Russian steppe and expanse of Mongolia... but in Sth America (where it seems the ASO are playing their cards in forseeable future) under todays land use and logistical constraints... I agree with you, it seems that DAKAR is headed more and more towards a "long WRC in the desert" format.
  6. iggs

    iggs Been here awhile

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    Even in the short time I've been in the UAE the pace of fence building has been very noticeable. It makes me think of what happened in the Wild West and the stories of cowboys complaining about barbed wire dividing up the plains. A friend has been writing a mountain bike guide but they keep tarmacing his trails! I used to work a bit in Kenya and the days of the animal overland migrations are gone.

    The Liwa is now reasonably populated with the Shah oilfield and new train track developments

    The worlds wild places only exist in pockets
  7. Myway

    Myway Long timer

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    They are shipping

    and

    others

    get their new bike

    picho829
    <TIME class=timestamp data-reactid=".0.0.1.0.0.0.0.0.0.1.0.0.0.0.1.2:0.0" data-timestamp-short="13u" datetime="1970-01-17T09:30:05.947Z">13 hours ago
    Gracias a kawasaki Uruguay por la nueva kxf 450f 2015 &#55357;&#56397;&#9994; ya en viaje a villa giardino Córdoba para que @lelli_competicion la convierta con el kit rally
  8. too old

    too old Keen supporter Supporter

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    Ha ha, I've both been in the Middle East too long and not paying attention - what is the norm in Europe in terms of diesel power is still quite alien out here and strange to even think about it :freaky
  9. troy safari carpente

    troy safari carpente Team f5oolery

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    </TD><TD style="BORDER-RIGHT: #575757 1px solid" id=td_post_ class=alt1><!-- icon and title -->dakar info
    <HR style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #575757; COLOR: #575757" SIZE=1><!-- / icon and title --><!-- message -->Hope this works,good info on stages etc

    http://netstorage.lequipe.fr/ASO/dakar/2014/historique/historique-dakar-1979-2013_us.pdf
    <!-- / message -->



    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    Johno get's an AA+ with honors for that link.

    Probably as definitive record as you'll find these days (all in one place) as far as Dakar facts and figures goes (all the way back to 1979).

    I had a quick skim back through (some of the early Paris - Dakar's) and for sure back then, there were some epic stages and distances. While there have been a few editions with very high percentage of selective stages as part of the total rally distance, for most of the Dakars history a large percentage of the route is comprised of liasion stages.

    It is fair to say although (in defence of CBV's point made) that back in the day (Africa) even the liasons - on many occassions - were every bit as challenging, long or arduous as the specials... the only difference being; the liasons were not timed to the second and were set at a (somewhat) attainable average. But there are many examples of participants DNFing the liason stages... especially back in the 80's.

    In general, the Dakars of the 80's and 90's in Africa were more "linear" in their route layout and stage character. By the 2000's, with all the more restricted access to certain western Safaran countries the routes became somewhat less "point to point" in character, using all more common stages from year to year. (Dakar - Cairo in 2000 is an exception to this).

    Latter half of 2000's the event stayed all the more in proximity to the Atlantic coastal countries (not the interior of the continent as had been the case in Sabine's day), till ultimately 2008 it was no more to be in Africa.

    The 2009 - 2014 editions in South America while still very tough (technically) on the special stages, have seen the rally (logically) use much more of the road network infrastructure in the countries the rally crosses, as liason stages and for the logistic transfer of the bivouac and support crews. This in turn has altered the "look" and congeniality of the bivouacs compared to Africa (Agadez... I'll never forget you :lol3), where the overnight stop locations often in proximity to larger towns/cities - with their self evident amenities.

    So for all these reasons (and more) the Dakar has changed from the rambling bedouin motorsport caravan it once (romamtically) may have been remembered, to the enourmous high tech motosport circus that it is today.

    The changes (good or bad... depending on your perspective) have certainly created one fact that cannot be refuted... today the intensity, and pace amongst the top competitors (both moto and auto) is consistently much closer to the maximum - in order to take stage victory - that what it has ever been. And I anticipate that 2015 edition will continue that trend. Combined with some long days, marathon stages and tough technical terrain... the DNF column is not likely to be any shorter this January than usual.
  10. Bluebull2007

    Bluebull2007 Adventurer

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    That link does not work Troy, URL is cut off. :deal

    CVB come and race the Amageza, next year. This year we had 2100 km in just 5 stages of which only 100km way black top to the finish in Cape Town. Stages are long as well. Next year is 7 stages at least.
  11. troy safari carpente

    troy safari carpente Team f5oolery

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  12. Balkan Boy

    Balkan Boy Long timer

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    Wow, what a document. :eek1
    It's even in English!

    AdvRider should start charging access during the Dakar. :wink:
  13. Deadly99

    Deadly99 Fast and Far

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    The Evolution. Perhaps a better name than The Odyssey.

    All things evolve, safer (relatively...no more traveling through war torn countries, people being lost for days on end, etc) more progressive equipment, better trained athletes, etc.

    This holds true not just for Rally Raid but for all sports. To think the Dakar should stand still and not evolve is a bit naive.

    Sure the ASO could have the Dakar in the middle east. Afghanistan, Iran and Syria would make for a heck of a destination :D

    20 years from now people will likely look back on these years as the "good old days" of Dakar. "They used gasoline engines on their bikes and their riders gear didn't have airbags!"

    So long as the attrition rate remains the same, the spirit is there. With modern technology being what it is, making the terrain more challenging is inevitable in order to maintain a level of difficulty. Adding high altitude specials is another, removing mechanics (marathon stages), etc.

    Personally I think the ASO is doing a stand up job in regards to keeping the Dakar as true to its roots as is possible given the inevitable evolution they are up against.

    I'd like to see a few subtle changes (forces bivouac stays for athletes, the removal of motor homes, etc), more marathon stages, etc...

    Without the long, paved, transits the race couldn't offer as diverse special stages. A Dakar entirely played out in the Atacama? Doable I suppose. As challenging and unique as seeing the white sand in Argentina, crossing the Andes, the Salt Flats in Bolivia, jungle stages in the Amazon (my bet is this is coming in the near future), the coastal dunes in Peru......no, I think the long liaisons are required so that the race can offer up what no other race does.


    Just my two cents :thumb
  14. Myway

    Myway Long timer

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    with 4 ladies at the start

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  15. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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  16. Uller

    Uller Done with this BS

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    Just a thought....I have read quite a few posts the last few days, and last few years for that matter, that relate to the riders/drivers post stage support. One of Deadly99's comments above made me ponder this.

    I don't know if I really have an opinion either way about the Marathon Stages and no RVs.

    With the stages these days being, essentially, an all out sprint for the front runners; why do we expect them to recuperate/rest/sleep/prepare for the following stages without modern conveniences and technology?

    They are definitely putting their bodies through more than those of past years due to the speed of the riding and the more technical terrain that they are riding over. Via modern medicine, we have a more in depth knowledge of what it takes to recuperate from that effort and energy expenditure. It seems to me that the teams are just using those new tools to "fix" the riders each night. How often did anyone get an IV to replace lost fluids quickly back in the 80's?

    Why should we expect them to physically work harder without the opportunity to have the work done to their bodies afterward? In a way, they are the other half of the race machine at this point and need maintenance too.
  17. beechum1

    beechum1 Dandole Gas al Burro

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    Great observation.
  18. HogWild

    HogWild Scott Whitney

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    It's an all out sprint partly because the race has gone soft and technology has eliminated many of the challenges. The next argument might be that they need GPS map screens and voice directions inside their helmets because paper roadbooks are outdated. After all, why would we expect them to use paper directions instead of the modern conveniences and technologies like GPS and voice commands? And while they are at it, think of how many crashes and injuries they could avoid if they just eliminated the big bumps and rocks by keeping the stages on pavement or very well maintained gravel, with speed limits of course. It's not supposed to be easy!
  19. iggs

    iggs Been here awhile

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    Just wondering how much the event is for the riders participating or for people like us spectating

    Spectators are the driver of sponsorship. Event organisers AND teams need it to fund er........everything
  20. BC61

    BC61 Long timer

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    Really depends on the point of view as to what the evolution of the Dakar should be. The Dakar has been a test of endurance and perserverance for man and machine. It still is for the masses but does not appear to be as much for the top riders. Technology is hard to reign in and will always be pushed to the limits. It is much easier to reign in the human being than the machine. Elite atheletes will always be prepared, they are paid to be. But once the race starts controls can be used to limit them. Take away the posh accomidations, access to doctors, nutrionalist and masseuse's and it will change how the elite rider's race.

    Does the Dakar evolve to a two week chain of sprint races or maintain as the ultimate endurance race?
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