The Running thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by slackmeyer, Oct 23, 2016.

  1. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    This place needs a running thread. If only to keep me and a few others from polluting other threads with our running gospel, I do understand how annoying it can be for people that only understand running as something to do when being chased by aggresive megafauna.

    I've been running fairly regularly for a year and a couple months now- and regularly is not nearly as much as some people run, but I usually get out a couple times a week. Sometimes once, sometimes 3 times, occasionally none, but that's ok- it's not punishment or a chore anymore, it's a nice thing to do to get out, work up a sweat, clear my head, and be back. I usually run at night, because I'm not a morning person, and I have a little kid that I like to spend time with while he's awake.

    Over the last few months, I've been trying to take some longer runs, and to build up weekly mileage enough to support that. My weekly mileage is still lagging- probably around 15-25, and being honest, even that is kind of cherry picking my better weeks. Somehow the long runs are still going ok- today's run was 19.6 miles, about 2500' elevation gain, and mostly on trails and fire roads. I was pretty worn out the last few miles, but that was partly from getting steamrolled by a running black lab at mile 15- it hit me right in the kneecap.

    My wife is a better and more dedicated runner- she ran her first marathon yesterday, a trail race, and came in 3rd woman, in under 4 hours. It's helped a lot to try to keep close to her abilities, and our competitive natures make it a lot easier for me to get out the door at 9 pm and go run intervals for an hour.

    I'd like to do some sort of race at some point- I'm normally a solitary runner, but the idea of picking a 50k or something in a really nice area on trails that I might not otherwise run or hike, and then using that as a training focus and a roadtrip sounds pretty good. Ultramarathons are appealing to me because I think I would more enjoy run/hiking/walking for a whole day, with finishing as a goal, than trying to run a good time in a larger event. Subject to change depending on my mood.
    #1
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  2. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie Supporter

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    I have a buddy who does
    Some ultra running and s load of
    trail running.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #2
  3. ydarg

    ydarg Miscreant

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    I *can* run some decent 5 and 10k times, 15k isn't out of the question. But you start talking marathons and 50k....shew, that's a whole other ballgame. Mrs. ydarg can do 1/2 and marathon distance trail runs and loves them.
    #3
  4. AZIFFEL

    AZIFFEL Been here awhile

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    I always run for myself, compete against myself. I one point I could average sub 6 min./mile for a marathon, now I'm at 6:52s, that's what age does. Running lets me clear my mind and unload the work day and personal demands for a while. It also helps keep the weight off that comes from my addiction to good food. It's fun at times to be part of large events such as Boston but I prefer the smaller local runs of 5k, 10k, and half marathons.

    I have found that shorter more intense runs during the week paired with a longer run on the weekend has kept injuries to a minimum. If I tried to run 50 miles a week as I did in my youth my body would break down.
    #4
  5. RolyKBiker

    RolyKBiker Road Worrier

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    I'm not competitive but get out three times a week for about 6 miles. I find it good for the mind and the body.
    I ran the London marathon back in 1995 in just under 4.30.
    #5
  6. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Wow. Much respect. I'm working towards breaking one 6 minute mile, on a track- hopefully by the end of the year.

    I have a question about your running pace- have you ever taken time off of running, like more than a few weeks? I'm curious whether some amount of speed stays with you, because of body mechanics and muscle memory and so on. I can take a year off of cycling, and still not have much problem going out for a 30-40 mile ride at a decent pace. With running, I feel like every little speed increase (i.e., getting my 10k pace closer to 8 min than 9), is hard fought, and I worry that I'll be back to square one if I slack off. I'm probably worrying about that too much, but I don't feel like a natural runner. At least I didn't, I don't have to think about it much now, and it's much better.

    I'm trying to do one short, intense run per week, and spend the rest of the time just getting more base miles, hopefully slowly increasing the pace of that easy base mileage.
    #6
  7. AZIFFEL

    AZIFFEL Been here awhile

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    Running is a limited repetitive motion, the amount you can do that movement is your measure of endurance. You won't lose much in 10 days away, some studies have shown there can actually be a benefit for recovery. If I go more than a couple of weeks without a run my leg turn over doesn't feel fluid and the effort to run is harder.

    If I do have to limit my miles I hit the pool and do laps, your cardio system has to work harder to propel your body with your arms than your legs. If time is limited to a short run I do repeats on a half mile long hill near my house. If you can find such a hill with a slope that lets you maintain your race goal pace for say three minutes, use it. Gravity is a cruel trainer but the results can't be argued with. When you can do this repeat 10 times at your goal pace go back to the track and check your mile time.

    Most runners that have never been coached to run distance events use to much of their quad muscles and fail to engage their lower legs and glutes for a quick foot turn over. I've never seen you form but a gait analysis can help your performance and health.
    #7
  8. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    Running hurts, and it makes my heart rate spike, then it sucks, and I slow down.... damnit. :hide
    #8
  9. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    You probably should slow down, dammit. Do some running at a conversation-carrying pace. Don't under estimate the amount of muscles that are working to propel and stabilize you, muscles that aren't working on a bicycle.
    Oh yeah, and show some respect for how efficient it is too to wear yourself out in a limited amount of time with running. You'd have to ride your bike around for hours to get that sort of workout. :lol3
    #9
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  10. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    Duly noted; I shall comply... begrudgingly. :bluduh
    #10
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  11. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    I think I've got a 50k trail race picked out for myself. It's late April, which is a little farther off than I'd like, but it is my birthday weekend, so that's good. I'm already fairly confident about the distance. And I'm already fairly worried about the elevation gain (6300' up, and the same amount down).
    #11
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  12. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    I think I know how you feel, it's hard to go out and run slow for an hour, I tried to start running and failed several times because I was too anxious to run fast too soon.
    #12
  13. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    I think my problem is that I don't have a basis of comparison for what slow vs fast is... at least for me. :dunno

    I know part of that problem is the level of fitness cycling has afforded me and it's giving me a false sense of overall fitness for any other activity. While running, any pace slower than 9 minutes feels like I'm almost walking. My HR is pegged at threshold but I don't feel like I'm "running"; if that makes sense. It feels like there isn't a middle ground for what I would call Tempo fitness. Walking fast barely gets my HR above L1 but as soon as I leave the ground and go to what I would classify as a brisk jogging pace, it jumps and stays pegged until my breathing gets out of rhythm and I back off.

    Maybe that's just attributed to a lack of running muscle development vs cycling muscle development but it's damn frustrating.
    #13
  14. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    I think you do know what a casual/recovery bike ride feels like in terms of exertion and heart rate though. You might need to find a way to run at that exertion level.
    Then again, I think you'll get better at running if you keep going at threshold exertion too-just as long as you don't hate it and give up first.

    Edit: and I think the high cadence/low speed runs are a good idea. They feel silly to do, but now that my distances are going up, I do a lot of running with that short quick stride. And I bob around a lot less than I did when I started running, which makes running a lot more comfortable.
    #14
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  15. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Yesterday morning had rain all over the forecast, but at 9:15 it as still dry, though cloudy. I got ready for my run, and in between putting on clothes and getting out shoes, the sky opened up. I waited around for most of an hour, the rain eased up some, and I decided to head out.
    It was raining cats and dogs for much of the run, but it was thoroughly enjoyable. Shorts and a windbreaker kept me at a good temperature for the whole time. I wore the shoes with drain holes, which worked perfectly-some of the trail was ankle deep flowing water, but the shoes pumped out the water quickly.

    I ended up running a bit less than 11 miles, about 4 of that on trails. My legs are a little dead this week since I've been running more days per week, but it was a fun time at an ok pace.
    I think a mellow little run today and then a couple days off would be good for me.
    IMG_20161030_111800710.jpg
    #15
  16. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    I finally had a good run this past Saturday. Decided to do 6-ish miles in hopes that it would be about an hour of running. Not ever pacing myself that distance took some time to get adjusted but I kept the HR below threshold the entire run. Speed relativity is what's screwing with my head I believe. Running at 10+ minutes per mile feels barely above mall walker pace. Also had to stare down and bully a dog back into his yard. Loud barker and chest out puffiness in the road. I learned pretty quickly that if you keep moving away from them, they think they're still chasing and you're intimidated. Turn around to face them, yell NO and making eye contact usually snaps them back into reality. Took a couple of times (and a brush with a car coming over the hill) but he got the idea.

    I'm registering for a 13k trail run to be held in February. I figure 12 weeks should be plenty of time to sort out my running legs for that distance.
    #16
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  17. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

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    I approve of this thread...

    I've been meaning to get more into trail running. Road running is boring to me. I'm typically around 30+ miles per week, but need to switch some of that to speed workouts. I need to find a local track, haven't done a good speed workout since we moved.

    And I agree on running to clear your head. I don't like running with music. I need to be alone, without media blaring at me, for at least some small portion of the week.
    #17
  18. catweasel67

    catweasel67 RD04

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    For me it's the Highland Fling in April - that's my next race. I did it this year but timed out at 40 miles - mainly because of the lack of hill training I'd done. So, this year, and for the next 5 months, it's all about hills and steps for me.

    FWIW last year I ran a few 50km runs (and a shitload of 20-30km) during training but they were flat. Not making that mistake again.
    #18
  19. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Hey, that looks like a cool route. I just listened to a hiking podcast about the West Highland way. And I've got to say, my first thought was "how much elevation can there be on trails in Scotland". 7500 feet makes for a good long day.

    I see there's only 4 aid stations in that 53 miles, is that race like a lot of euro mountain races where there's a pretty serious list of gear you have to carry during the race? The Whiskeytown Waterfalls 50k that I'll probably do has no more than 6 miles between aid stations, but I ordered an inexpensive running vest so that I could try it out on some long non-race trail runs. And by runs, I probably mean fast hikes with a bit of jogging on easy sections so I can get in 30 or 35 miles in a long day.
    #19
  20. catweasel67

    catweasel67 RD04

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    The mandatory gear requirement is tiny - an emergency blanket and a phone. But you'd have to be mad, or a world class athlete, if that's all you took. It's a well walked path and it's not closed for for the Fling so you're passing a reasonably steady stream of hikers during the day. Plus there are sweepers to catch the stragglers. The main risks are over-exertion (one guy completed his race last year and went straight to the first aid tent and said "I've been having some pretty bad chest pain for the last 3 hours") and accidents - a broken arm, a leg or two, a few broken noses/cheek bones - lots of broken toes and toenails falling off - the usual. It helps, a hell of a lot, that it's in April - nice and cool. The start temperature was about 0 (at 6am), rose to about 9ish during the day, but not much rain and no snow.

    FWIW I use a Salomon S-lab race pack - solid as a rock, real flexible with enough room for what I considered to be mandatory.
    #20