The Running thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by slackmeyer, Oct 23, 2016.

  1. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    You are probably right. I'll have to get in touch with my doctor and get refferal. I had the problem knee rebuilt a few years ago after destroying my ACL after messing up a wheelie.
    Has never been quite like OEM since.


    I found slow running easy on the head once I got settled in. It was nice to just kind of plug along. Missing it now. Of course running fast is more funner
  2. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Ran around Lake Accotink this afternoon. Closest dry place on my way home. There were a few soggy spots, but overall Accotink drains really well.

    Ran in shorts and a SS wicking shirt. Forearms got cold, but the rest of me was somewhat sweaty. I'd bet that a LS shirt would have been too hot. :dunno

    M
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  3. Skapegoat

    Skapegoat Been here awhile

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    I generally overdressed on long runs and perform some strip teasing as I go if needed!:happay
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  4. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    Ran again yesterday, did not die; WIN! :knary
  5. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    No running for me, but I do have a PT appointment set.
  6. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    So I was out at Wakefield park yesterday.

    Leaves all over the trails so I *thought* I was taking it easy. Walking where I couldn't see where I was stepping.

    ...right till I hit a tree root wrong and rolled my left ankle again

    Something went 'pop!' and I had to hobble back to the van.

    Ankle is swollen and sore.

    :bluduh

    Rode the bicycle to vote. 45ish min and maybe 15km. My pedal stroke isn't as fluid as it was day before yesterday, but I can still pedal

    M
  7. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    For someone who's only organized running was 1 year of track in middle school,
    I'm diggin the coaching feature of this Garmin.

    I was a bit thrown off by my tempo run yesterday though.
    The watch had a specific pace range it wanted me to run, though I can definitely run faster without much more difficulty,
    but that's not the point of a tempo right? So I should be trying to fall within the prescribed range?
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  8. Skapegoat

    Skapegoat Been here awhile

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    Yep fall within the prescribed range or your tempo becomes a treshold run and there is a difference.

    The biggest mistake most new runners or returning runners make is running to fast to often.
    This leads to injury and over training.

    Read up on the 80/20 method and training by heart rate and stick to your plan religiously.

    Train smart (more slowly than you think walk up hills in slow runs etc) , then race fast.
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  9. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    Wait wait wait, I thought tempo and threshold were the same...??

    So what is a true tempo run? A tempo run—also known as an anaerobic threshold or lactate-threshold run—is a pace about 25 to 30 seconds per mile slower than your current 5K race pace, according to running coach Jack Daniels, Ph. ... That's the key difference between a race and a tempo run.Aug 22, 2018

    Tempo Run | What Is a Tempo Run? - Runner's World
  10. Skapegoat

    Skapegoat Been here awhile

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    Where I come from a tempo run is a zone 3hr run where you are a good few beats below treshold.

    For instance if your lactate treshold is 170bpm 155-165 would be tempo pace.

    A sub lactate treshold run is a zone 4 hr zone run which should be within 5 beats of your actual lactate treshold and NEVER above it.

    Again if your Lactate treshold is 170 you would stay within 165 to 170 max.


    A few caviates to this, until you get a proper lab based treshold test you won't be working off exact science.

    Garmin etc will get close but its an educated guess based on an algorythym.

    I would rarely run in zone 3 and alot of people consider this zone the junk mile zone.
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  11. Skapegoat

    Skapegoat Been here awhile

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    I should add that the term Tempo is used in alot of cases by different coaches to mean different things.
    If you think about it, tempo means speed but its an unspecified speed.
    You can play music at different tempos.

    It really is a flexible and changable therefore it is not a good term to be used in running.

    Lactate Treshold is a scientific term that can be measured to a more exact point.
    The way I look at it is if you want to train properly you must know your lactate treshold.
    Guessing and algorythyms will get you so far but when training by heart rate its advised to find out your Lactate treshold and retest for it every 6 months.
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  12. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    I found three different runnersworld articles yesterday that defined the zones three different ways.
    And it seems tempo can be, at least on the internet, just as ambiguous.

    Isn't the only true way to measure lactate threshold is a blood test while exercising?
    This dad-of-young-children has no time for that.

    Trying to figure this out is stressing me out, I'm getting way to nerdy and exact, and that is not where I want to be with running,
    at least right now.

    I found a article that said you should be able to breath through your nose comfortable for easy runs -
    I'm just going to use this as my mantra for now.
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  13. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    You can always apply RPE to your fitness activities until/if you decide to invest more serious investment into attaining peaks and maintaining at an optimal aerobic threshold.

    https://www.runnersworld.com/training/a29706103/what-is-rpe/

    Tempo, from my years of racing and training on bikes is more defined as a level of effort expended during a race when you're not at full gas. It's an in-between from pushing up to threshold for pulls at the front of the main pack or attacks on other racers to find their weaknesses, then recovering back down in the endurance level if you're sheltered deep within the peloton and just pedaling along with the group. If I'm in a pulling rotation at the front of a pack; I'm most likely at threshold when on the front, then back into tempo as I rotate back. Repeat; ad nauseam.

    When training solo (running or cycling); I try to avoid tempo sessions during the racing season and only use them off-season re-building the base.

    "How RPE Helps You
    While a coach likely won’t prescribe a training program based on RPEs, you should be paying attention to your RPE while you run. That’s because running workouts shouldn’t be one-intensity-fits-all. Slower, easier runs serve as aerobic conditioning or recovery, while harder speed work and intervals push your max heart rate and ability to sustain higher-intensities for longer.

    The more you take note of your effort level, the better you’ll get at accurately gauging it, says de Mille. And the better you can gauge your intensity, the more you can push yourself and the less likely you are to push yourself too hard.

    That has two benefits: First, it keeps you from falling into the moderate-intensity trap, that comfortably efficient pace that inevitably leads to a rut because you’re never doing low- or high-intensity, you’re just...running."
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  14. Bloodweiser

    Bloodweiser honestly

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    RPE is/was my go-to.
    My recent watch purpose was more or less an expedition in curiosity as to how those efforts correlated to pace and HR.
    It's helped with pushing me harder on fast days, and keeping me slower on easy runs.

    But it's hindered me too, you are all witnessing me fall into this data trap.
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  15. DeepSea

    DeepSea electronically challenged

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    Don't let it stress you out. Finding the subtleties in your pace/effort takes a long time. Have fun, keep it simple and enjoy the journey. The mental aspect of this can sway you physically either direction. :deal

    On a side note. Results for a race lottery came out today. It seems I'll be in the Tahoe 200 for Sept 2021.:yikes

    Guess I better start upping my mileage. :lol3
    Steve
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  16. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    I'm holding strong at 2 miles per week... :gdog

    :hide
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  17. gazoo

    gazoo Wandering

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    Good advice. By trade I'm a data nerd, and analyze everything. I need to force myself at times to just run, relax, and enjoy it.

    And congrats on getting into Tahoe! Candice and her Destination Trail crew seem to put on well managed events, and the Tahoe course looks fantastic!
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  18. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    These are my last three runs on the service road in front of my office. Despite my lack of discipline in doing more than one run per week out there; last night's run felt markedly better, both to my RPE, and to my form. I switched back to my old Pearl Izumi N2 shoes for that run and felt like I could control my foot placement much easier and the forefoot impacts were less.. impactful. Still gotta work on improving SPM, but I was pleased with slowing my pace back to an easier 10 minute mile.

    Comparisons_2mile.PNG
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  19. DeepSea

    DeepSea electronically challenged

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    Thanks. I have a few friends, that between them, have done all three 200's. That's the general consensus of all her races.

    The data definitely has a place. Just don't let it consume you. Some of my best runs are when I'm lost in thought and doing it all by feel.

    When you cycle, what's your normal cadence? I think my cycling affects my running cadence or possibly its the other way around.
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  20. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    85-90 rpm for most training rides. I’ll spin up to 120 for faster rides and down to 50-60 for singlespeed mountain stupidity.
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