The TAT Preparation Thread-the logistical side of it

Discussion in 'Americas' started by leftystrat62, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. CBAT

    CBAT occasional wanderer

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    Get that SPOT and carry it on your person. If you have get thrown and are seperated from the bike and injured badly your may not be able to get to a SPOT mounted on the bike. There was a guy who got thrown off his bike when he landed one ledge below the road while his bike landed about 80 feet below him in the creek bottom. He banged up pretty good but was able to crawl back up to the trail where is riding buddy came back and found him. If he had been solo he may have been there a long time before being found.
  2. Gravetter

    Gravetter Been here awhile

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    I'll bring an inReach or Spot even with riding with someone.
  3. rbrhsv

    rbrhsv Arizona Adventure Rider

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    I second the advice of GPS tracks plus maps.
    I tried using the roll charts for 1 day last year on the eastern section - then gave up. I used the GPS tracks exclusively after that, and glanced at the map occasionally to confirm turns and major intersections.
    I found the roll charts to be a real pain - they kept jamming in the holder and needed to be changed too often.
    If Sam offered the option, I'd skip the charts entirely.
  4. Blaise W

    Blaise W Long timer Supporter

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    I found the roll charts very entertaining and used them all the way. We did have gps and that was helpful when there was a problem or I couldn't find the turn easily. Didn't happen very many times. I sure made a few wrong turns though but you figure it out soon enough. That said, next time I will just use tracks.

    The roll charts added a bit more challenge and it seemed like the way it should be done. Guess I am old school!
  5. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    The rollcharts were great when the GPS tracks didn't explain well enough. I made my GPS tracks based off of the rollcharts (finished making them one week before Sam put the charts for sale, blah.) so mine weren't perfect. Nonetheless, I used the charts AT LEAST once a day.
  6. rtwdoug

    rtwdoug prominent underachiever Supporter

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    my roll chart holder still has day 1 loaded in it, if that gives you any idea of how much I used them :lol3

    I used the GPS, but would refer to the maps often. the worst area for me was northern nevada, I really wish I had bought a gazeteer or something for NEV
  7. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    I used both..worst part for me was Oregon...that was when I lost my intuitive tracker (i.e. Ken AKA Blaise W)....and it was up to me to read the GPS and roll charts.:huh
  8. Blaise W

    Blaise W Long timer Supporter

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    Oregon was just a b itch to navigate when you were in the timber cutting areas. Trails, side trails, re-routed trails around obstacles, new logging roads, old logging roads, you get the idea. You really had to just feel your way thru and head what seemed like the right way. After wondering if we were lost several times we would pop out of the single track and onto a decent (tongue in cheek) logging road and low and behold, the chart mileages and turns would match right up. Never give up! As One Less said, I had to bail on the last day so can't talk about that stretch. I seem to remember a lot of logging by One Less and Kevin though,. It is timber felling country though, isn't it!

    One more though on the roll charts, and why I enjoyed using them. The pioneers used road books of sorts to cross the country, although the landmarks were a lot farther apart than our road intersections. The roll charts gave me just a little bit of that feeling.
  9. Wmac

    Wmac Adventurer

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    Fantastic thread - a lot of amazing info here - Thanks! I'm planning to ride the TAT July/Aug 2015.

    I do have a question for the guys who have completed the TAT: I'm starting in Nashville, TN - how quickly could someone do this, reasonably and safely, if the challenge was to do it without stopping to smell the roses? No side trips, no BS. Just go on the TAT Nashville to Oregon as quickly as possible?
  10. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    I did it in 15 days from the Tulsa area. I wasn't going FAST but I definitely wasn't going slow. I averaged 150-250 miles a day, a couple 300 and 400 mile days in there as well. I figure you can do it in less than 20 days at a safe but rose-less pace.
  11. CBAT

    CBAT occasional wanderer

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    Anyone planning on hitting the TAT be aware of this advisory for Nevada and Oregon.
  12. E1Allen

    E1Allen UH-60 Pilot

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    My friend and I are doing the tat in 17 days and we are leaving July 2nd from Michigan, hitting the east coast then heading west for the tat. We may bypass some stuff In the east to give us more time out west but we have just under two weeks to make it to the west coast.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
  13. poster

    poster Adventurer

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    Hey guys,

    I am planning on doing the Western portion of TAT this summer. Sadly I am limited by the time I can take off from work so the decision was easy. Everybody I have ever spoken to about the trip said that if they could they would skip the Eastern portion of the trip.

    The logistics of my trip are the toughest nut to crack. I am based out of Philadelphia. The plan is to load up two dirtbikes onto the truck and drive out to Colorado.

    Once in Colorado, ship the pick up truck to Oregon and jump on the bike to start the trip. Once we finish in Oregon we load up the truck and off we go back to Philly.

    Sadly I have only 3 weeks to complete all of this and it looks like the driving back and forth will take me a week. So now I only have two weeks to complete the Western TAT.

    In your experience is it doable to complete the TAT from Colorado to Oregon in two weeks in July?
  14. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff. Supporter

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    Put your expenses on a spreadsheet and DON'T go for minimum cost. Include time elements and think in terms of bang for the buck. Do this trip to enjoy it, not to simply accomplish it but feel stressed for weeks after the end.

    You will lose at least a week of vacation days in getting everything to Colorado, then back from Oregon. Shipping the truck will also be expensive. Don't forget that your spreadsheet needs hotels, food, truck gas, truck tires, tolls, etc. The official rate for driving reimbursement is about 55 cents/mile and while gas alone is less, the actual cost is not too far from that. In your spreadsheet, absolutely include the income you will have if you don't need to spend that week of vacation droning along the interstates in the truck. I'll bet that alone will pay for the airplane tickets.

    Since we are not yet in high season, two ideas to try in cutting flight costs are to buy a pre-season fare now with recognition of accepting the cost of making a last minute change to the day you will use it, or to buy frequent flier miles if you already have some. As a third idea, if somebody you know has a lot of miles, you may be able to get them to sell or donate some to you.

    You ought to find that while slightly more expensive, the bang for buck trade-off overwhelmingly is better for shipping the bikes (loaded and nearly ready to ride) to Colorado, then home from Oregon, and not shipping the truck.


  15. esp41

    esp41 Been here awhile

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    Can it be done. Yes. You will be riding long days and hoping for no serious mechanical issues. Take a tent. A lot of the small motels we found when crossing in 2013 were full up by 3:00pm. (Especially west of Moab.)


    I agree with Wreckchecker. Try Uship dot com to get the bikes there and fly. You can then enjoy the experience and maybe take a side trip or two. For me, the trip meant a lot more than checking off the "TAT" box on a resume.
  16. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    Looking at riding from Moab to Bend starting around June 4th. Anybody want to give me and the XR a ride down to socal from central oregon?
  17. FlameDance

    FlameDance Been here awhile

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    Hi guys,

    I'm going to go adventure riding this summer, got several months free time ahead. One of the options I'm looking at is the TAT. I could bring my own bike from Europe (KTM 950 SuperEnduro) but transport is really costly (in total about 5K from Europe to the US and back home). So I'm looking at buying a bike near the TAT start.

    I've looked at KTMs dealer adresses but of course at KTMs official site you only get adresses and fancy dealer websites. Could you recommend me a good dealer where I could buy a bike, let's say a 690 or 950? A used bike would be fine provided it is in good condition. The dealer should have experience in preparing the bike with a couple of farkles for roadbook etc.

    How do I get a licence plate and insurances in the US as a foreigner from Germany?

    Thanks for any hints,
    Stephan
  18. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff. Supporter

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    The best price on an airplane ticket within a day's ride to the start would be to fly into Atlanta or DC.
    At that point, use Craigslist and look in the motorcycle section:
    http://washingtondc.craigslist.org

    The one thing you are going to need is an address for registering the bike and to make it a LOT easier to get insurance.

    What follows for process can vary a little by State but is generally similar in most: When you buy a used vehicle from an individual in most US States, you then take it to get a safety inspection. That can be done at many auto repair places, so it is fairly quick and you can wait an hour or two. While waiting, you can call an insurance company to get insurance. Then you take the title, bill of sale, inspection paper, and insurance number (from the phone) to the State motor vehicle department and they will issue the new plates.

    If you buy from a dealer, they will charge you to do nearly all the legwork, but you still need an address to base your paperwork at. Dealer charges can go from $150 to nothing, which means the price of the bike has been kept high enough to cover it.

    Don't forget to look at the DR650, DRZ400, KLR, or other dual sports.
  19. poster

    poster Adventurer

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    Good call! We decided that shipping bikes and flying out there is going to make more sense.

    We are also going to grab a tent in case we can not find a motel.

    How did you guys ended up going about getting food while out on the trail? We are hoping to do a mix of camping and motels. We do not want to over pack with camping gear and cans of food at the same time.

    Will we be able to find a store every 2 or three days to stock up on food?
  20. SCflyer

    SCflyer Long timer

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    Food shouldn't be a problem. You'll pass through or near a town daily (through Oklahoma anyway) and the gas stops will have something there or near. If you have the maps remember it gives info on hotel/motels at certain distances. If you're going to carry food...why not the freeze dried camping meals and small burner for water? Has to be less wt than and bunch of canned stuff and less space.

    Safe travels