The tipping point is right around the corner.

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by MJSfoto1956, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    Solar has its place, but it's not the long-term answer for all of our power requirements.
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  2. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    Long term answer is nuclear fusion. We have our top men working on it. Top men! (TM)
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  3. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    It is much more efficient to burn it at the power plants.
  4. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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  5. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    But until that day comes, the 1st world is moving towards hydrogen.
  6. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    The German Navy could have used electric batteries in their new state of the art submarine, but they went with hydrogen fuel cells. They apparently get more electric only silent range before they require re-fueling - compared to electric batteries. If electric batteries would provide a warship propulsion system an advantage, they would have gone with electric battery power.

    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/ill-be-back-germany-submarine-power-again-110651
  7. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    The Navy is much less concerned with efficiency than with battle-readiness. This is NOT the case for the mass market, or we all would be riding mil-spec Batmobiles.
  8. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    Bullshit:

    https://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/alternative-fuels/fuel-cell3.htm

    If the fuel cell is powered with pure hydrogen, it has the potential to be up to 80-percent efficient. That is, it converts 80 percent of the energy content of the hydrogen into electrical energy.
    For comparison, Li-ion has 99 percent efficiency.
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  9. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    How we GENERATE energy is completely independent of how we use it. We still need to generate electricity to produce hydrogen. The efficiency of producing hydrogen from water is about 80%, and efficiency of fuel cells is up to 80%, so overall efficiency is about 64%. In other words, by replacing electric batteries with hydrogen, we're losing more than a third of the energy.

    I cannot fathom how anyone would think this is a good idea.
  10. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    Most of the Europe and Asia are heading toward hydrogen:

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2...backing-hydrogen-fuel-cell-cars/#.XhflH4h7m70

    https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/10-countries-moving-towards-a-green-hydrogen-economy
  11. ScottieDucati

    ScottieDucati Adventurer

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    Hydrogen is great for long hauls, batteries are ideal for consumer commuting. It’s not a one-tech-beats-all scenario.
  12. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    Currently, that is true. I believe it will change once a hydrogen infrastructure is well established. Toyota, the pioneer of the Prius, believes hydrogen is the future and has abandoned the Prius and is focusing on their hydrogen vehicles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Mirai
  13. ScottieDucati

    ScottieDucati Adventurer

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    Oh I’m well aware. A former colleague of mine heads their global research.

    We worked on early days of hydrogen fuel cell work in the us. From codes and standards to safety of fueling and maintenance issues. Mostly supporting the Fuel Cell Bus Program.

    Batteries will still dominate for the next few decades or more.

    I’d rather charge at home than have to find stations after ICEs.
  14. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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    I believe more like 8-10 years. I believe we will see the hydrogen universe grow exponentially over the next decade. There are a lot of forces wanting to make this happen. For instance, right now in the US, if your buy a Toyota Mirai, you get a $15,000 hydrogen fuel card. Soon, there will be 200 hydrogen fuel stations in the Los Angeles area.
  15. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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  16. PoundSand

    PoundSand Long timer

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    Toyota hasn't abandoned the Prius. It's simply been eclipsed by their 'regular' hybrids (Corolla, Camry, Highlander, RAV4, etc) which use the same tech. And they certainly aren't focusing on the Mirai, with the 1500 or so the sell, over those hybrids.
  17. Drifter

    Drifter Long timer

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  18. Cam

    Cam Been here awhile

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    Bill Gate's Terrapower reactor may well be the future. That reactor runs on depleted uranium which we have an abundance of and really no way to dispose of it. Those reactors can fully fail without worry of a containment breach as well. The cost is pretty staggering but if they can start building them, they will likely get the price down quickly. It is an amazing technology and design.

    They had a deal to build the first one in China but Trump's trade war put a stop to that.
  19. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    Wow, who would have imagined it?

    Batteries don’t yet have enough storage capacity to power a submarine.
    Haven’t they invented the underwater charging station yet?

    :stupid
  20. PoundSand

    PoundSand Long timer

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